100-125 ISO Film question

Cumberland Falls-7

A
Cumberland Falls-7

  • 1
  • 0
  • 61
Winter

A
Winter

  • 2
  • 0
  • 171
Pig Iron elevations.jpg

A
Pig Iron elevations.jpg

  • 1
  • 0
  • 240
Cumberland Falls-6

A
Cumberland Falls-6

  • 0
  • 0
  • 184
Untitled

A
Untitled

  • 2
  • 0
  • 211

Recent Classifieds

Forum statistics

Threads
181,940
Messages
2,517,775
Members
95,456
Latest member
jrhii
Recent bookmarks
0

hiroh

Member
Joined
Dec 30, 2021
Messages
92
Location
USA
Shooter
Hybrid
I like the look of FP4 or Delta 100, and I often shoot with it during the bright day. But I often left the roll unfinished during the day and when the sun comes down, or when I'm inside the house with my kids, I feel I'm unable to use this camera anymore because the film is too slow. Then, I have to use my digital camera just because the slow film is my analog camera.

What do you think about this? Would you shoot with 100 film in low light, would you replace the film with half roll through. Would you prefer to always shoot with faster film always and avoid situations when you cannot shot because the film?

But sometimes I feel the same with Tri-X. It's a bit faster, more flexible, but when it gets dark in my house, I still feel I cannot shoot it with it, it's too slow. I need much much faster film, otherwise it will be either underexposed or a way slow shutter for two kids that never stop moving.

But then I insert Delta 3200, shoot in the house half way though and the next day, it's sunny and bright outside and I have Delta 3200 inside (not my favorite). And then I just shoot something random to finish the roll and put another film. That's the waste, but I don't think of anything better yet. I know there's a way to shot the roll half way and then re-insert it again, and rewind it to the position where it was before, but I never tried that. I'm not that profficient with the film, so it's not a second nature to me. I'd need to take all the notes and pay much more attention and potentially ruin the previous shots, rather than save some, but if that's the only way, I guess I'll have to learn it.
 

Radost

Member
Joined
Jan 21, 2021
Messages
598
Location
USA from Ukraine
Shooter
Multi Format
tmax3200 @1600 is what I do. Trix can be pushed as well.
What maximum shutter speed is your camera?
 

alanrockwood

Member
Joined
Oct 11, 2006
Messages
2,037
Shooter
Multi Format
I like the look of FP4 or Delta 100, and I often shoot with it during the bright day. But I often left the roll unfinished during the day and when the sun comes down, or when I'm inside the house with my kids, I feel I'm unable to use this camera anymore because the film is too slow. Then, I have to use my digital camera just because the slow film is my analog camera.

What do you think about this? Would you shoot with 100 film in low light, would you replace the film with half roll through. Would you prefer to always shoot with faster film always and avoid situations when you cannot shot because the film?

But sometimes I feel the same with Tri-X. It's a bit faster, more flexible, but when it gets dark in my house, I still feel I cannot shoot it with it, it's too slow. I need much much faster film, otherwise it will be either underexposed or a way slow shutter for two kids that never stop moving.

But then I insert Delta 3200, shoot in the house half way though and the next day, it's sunny and bright outside and I have Delta 3200 inside (not my favorite). And then I just shoot something random to finish the roll and put another film. That's the waste, but I don't think of anything better yet. I know there's a way to shot the roll half way and then re-insert it again, and rewind it to the position where it was before, but I never tried that. I'm not that profficient with the film, so it's not a second nature to me. I'd need to take all the notes and pay much more attention and potentially ruin the previous shots, rather than save some, but if that's the only way, I guess I'll have to learn it.

Solution: two camera bodies loaded with different films.
 

koraks

Moderator
Joined
Nov 29, 2018
Messages
5,525
Location
Europe
Shooter
Multi Format
Solution: two camera bodies loaded with different films.

This.

Alternatively, finish the roll during the daytime, reload at night.

Or shoot a faster film all the time and accept the grain etc.

Or be happy with the technical prowess of digital for the indoor shots.

Or just use a smartphone for the photos of your kids; makes it easier to share those images with your partner and today's smartphones make very decent photos anyway.

So many options! :smile:
 

Timo Schön

Member
Joined
Apr 4, 2022
Messages
33
Location
Vienna
Shooter
35mm
I like the look of FP4 or Delta 100, and I often shoot with it during the bright day. But I often left the roll unfinished during the day and when the sun comes down, or when I'm inside the house with my kids, I feel I'm unable to use this camera anymore because the film is too slow. Then, I have to use my digital camera just because the slow film is my analog camera.

What do you think about this? Would you shoot with 100 film in low light, would you replace the film with half roll through. Would you prefer to always shoot with faster film always and avoid situations when you cannot shot because the film?

But sometimes I feel the same with Tri-X. It's a bit faster, more flexible, but when it gets dark in my house, I still feel I cannot shoot it with it, it's too slow. I need much much faster film, otherwise it will be either underexposed or a way slow shutter for two kids that never stop moving.

But then I insert Delta 3200, shoot in the house half way though and the next day, it's sunny and bright outside and I have Delta 3200 inside (not my favorite). And then I just shoot something random to finish the roll and put another film. That's the waste, but I don't think of anything better yet. I know there's a way to shot the roll half way and then re-insert it again, and rewind it to the position where it was before, but I never tried that. I'm not that profficient with the film, so it's not a second nature to me. I'd need to take all the notes and pay much more attention and potentially ruin the previous shots, rather than save some, but if that's the only way, I guess I'll have to learn it.

If possible I would recommend getting a second body / camera so that you can have two seperate rolls loaded. Maybe something like a Yashica Electro 35 or a canonet for the indoor work. Those are cheapish and have a fast and very good lens. There also are lots of good SLRs that can be had with a f1.7 lens for under 50$!
 

Helge

Member
Joined
Jun 27, 2018
Messages
3,297
Location
Denmark
Shooter
Medium Format
Off camera flash bounced. Simple remote triggers are cheap. Just plop a flash or two in the room and start shooting. If bounced against walls or ceiling, you never have to fear blinding the camera or the persons. Just make sure the camera can never see directly into the flash head.
With a little experience, it will be indistinguishable from artificial light.
 
OP
OP

hiroh

Member
Joined
Dec 30, 2021
Messages
92
Location
USA
Shooter
Hybrid
Second body sounds the best for me because I'd rather have slower film with less grain always in my camera when I need it, and faster only when it gets dark.

I actually have the second body, that I got from my father but I tried it once to make sure it works and I didn't touched it since, so I'm not used to this camera.

Buying a second body for indoor shots to replicate my main camera would be too expensive :smile:
 

otto.f

Subscriber
Joined
Aug 18, 2017
Messages
241
Location
Netherlands
Shooter
Multi Format
I once used Tmax 3200 @1600 for a project of postcards of the old city of Leiden, only in sunlight to get that nice grainy effect. Quite a nice film
 

JPD

Member
Joined
Mar 24, 2007
Messages
1,662
Location
Sweden
Shooter
Medium Format
With a ISO 400 film I can take handheld shots at f:4 1/10 in a well lit room. Faster speeds are possible with a faster lens, at f:2,8 or 2,0. Tmax 400 is a nice fine-grained film, not much grainier than Plus-X/FP4.
 

Radost

Member
Joined
Jan 21, 2021
Messages
598
Location
USA from Ukraine
Shooter
Multi Format
Sometimes in the summer I like to only have on camera at the beach during the day and around town at the evening. A 400 film with a modern camera and fast shutter is the solution. Sometimes I use A7 with pushed TMAX400 @800 or tmax3200 @1000
 

npl

Member
Joined
Nov 28, 2021
Messages
78
Location
France
Shooter
35mm
A fast film and a set of ND filters in your photo bag could also work : ND4, ND8, ND16..
 
Joined
Sep 19, 2003
Messages
13,157
Location
K,Germany
Shooter
Medium Format
I like the look of FP4 or Delta 100, and I often shoot with it during the bright day. But I often left the roll unfinished during the day and when the sun comes down, or when I'm inside the house with my kids, I feel I'm unable to use this camera anymore because the film is too slow. Then, I have to use my digital camera just because the slow film is my analog camera.

What do you think about this? Would you shoot with 100 film in low light, would you replace the film with half roll through. Would you prefer to always shoot with faster film always and avoid situations when you cannot shot because the film?

But sometimes I feel the same with Tri-X. It's a bit faster, more flexible, but when it gets dark in my house, I still feel I cannot shoot it with it, it's too slow. I need much much faster film, otherwise it will be either underexposed or a way slow shutter for two kids that never stop moving.

But then I insert Delta 3200, shoot in the house half way though and the next day, it's sunny and bright outside and I have Delta 3200 inside (not my favorite). And then I just shoot something random to finish the roll and put another film. That's the waste, but I don't think of anything better yet. I know there's a way to shot the roll half way and then re-insert it again, and rewind it to the position where it was before, but I never tried that. I'm not that profficient with the film, so it's not a second nature to me. I'd need to take all the notes and pay much more attention and potentially ruin the previous shots, rather than save some, but if that's the only way, I guess I'll have to learn it.

that's something we need to live with. Film doesn't have the ISO flexibility of digital. I find ISO 125 about ideal for film and FP4 has the best film characteristics for general shooting IMO. Keep one film body with FP4, and another for whatever you may need at the time. Use digital as an emergency.
 
Joined
Sep 19, 2003
Messages
13,157
Location
K,Germany
Shooter
Medium Format
A fast film and a set of ND filters in your photo bag could also work : ND4, ND8, ND16..

no, then you always end up with the advantages of fast film characteristics. Use the appropriate film for the situation and keep several film buddies around.
 
Joined
Feb 12, 2022
Messages
9
Location
Hanover, Germany
Shooter
Multi Format
Get a flash. In the past I always hesitated to use one because I didn't like the high-contrast-super-harsh look I was used to from cheap compacts, smartphones or compact cameras. But in the last half year I learned how to bounce flash and how to balance it was ambient light. With black and white you don't even have problems with colour balance. It's worth at least a try!
 

Helge

Member
Joined
Jun 27, 2018
Messages
3,297
Location
Denmark
Shooter
Medium Format
Get a flash. In the past I always hesitated to use one because I didn't like the high-contrast-super-harsh look I was used to from cheap compacts, smartphones or compact cameras. But in the last half year I learned how to bounce flash and how to balance it was ambient light. With black and white you don't even have problems with colour balance. It's worth at least a try!

Like I said in #9. Way too many people are
afraid of flash.
The key is to bounce it. Or use an off camera diffuser.
It’s looks wonderful. You can make it look completely natural or like a photo shoot. It’s up to you.
In large rooms it’s good to have a second flash to light the background for instance.
 

BrianShaw

Member
Joined
Nov 30, 2005
Messages
13,477
Location
Here or there.
Shooter
Multi Format
… or use an on-camera flash with an attached flash diffuser. There is no value in avoiding, fearing, or eschewing flash when it’s really a useful photographic tool.
 

John Wiegerink

Subscriber
Joined
May 29, 2009
Messages
2,332
Location
Lake Station, MI
Shooter
Multi Format
It's funny how flash lighting has fallen by the wayside. When I first started in photography it was "flash bulbs" when light fell to low. Then we really took a step forward and "electronic flash" came along. Now, with digital, flash is almost a thing of the past for most folks. Flash is just another tool in our tool box and I still keep my flash units from my wedding photography days. Yes, even today the use of flash can improve some photos, but it takes skill to know how to use it correctly. One thing in the favor of flash at present is that there are tons of used flash heafds on the big auction.
To the OP, if you like the slower film better than anything else, get a swivel head flash unit. Otherwise I would go with HP5+ or TMY2. Or, as some folks here suggest, a second body. Those are the three choices I think that are the best. Now you're the one that has to decide.
 

Helge

Member
Joined
Jun 27, 2018
Messages
3,297
Location
Denmark
Shooter
Medium Format
This.

Alternatively, finish the roll during the daytime, reload at night.

Or shoot a faster film all the time and accept the grain etc.

Or be happy with the technical prowess of digital for the indoor shots.

Or just use a smartphone for the photos of your kids; makes it easier to share those images with your partner and today's smartphones make very decent photos anyway.

So many options! :smile:
Digital ISO is not the same as film sensitivity at all.
The base sensitivity is about the same for film and digital sensors. They both hover in the 100 to 800 zone.
The rest is amplification.
Digital amplifies more linearly. And for longer. But that is not a fundamental of film, but a necessity brought on by the need to be able to store film.

Film is amplified by development and developer has sadly until today not been a very linear amplifier.
That’s what a lot of experiments in developing is basically about: Linearizing development.

But, in the words of Pee-Wee Herman, “there is always a big but”; by amplifying the signal from the sensor you cut down drastically on dynamic range (can be important in artificially lit environments and leads to a harsher flatter look), colour accuracy/natural vibrancy and resolution and you get sampling noise that is fundamentally different from films grain noise.
That is what almost all of demosaicing/RAW processing is about. And is the distinguishing factor for almost all “improvements” in digital for the last couple of decades.

By shooting film you are bypassing all that.
Low ISO film shot ideally (which is not that hard) will always provide superior results.

Flash is in a sense slow films answer to linear amplification.
 
Last edited:

Helge

Member
Joined
Jun 27, 2018
Messages
3,297
Location
Denmark
Shooter
Medium Format
It's funny how flash lighting has fallen by the wayside. When I first started in photography it was "flash bulbs" when light fell to low. Then we really took a step forward and "electronic flash" came along. Now, with digital, flash is almost a thing of the past for most folks. Flash is just another tool in our tool box and I still keep my flash units from my wedding photography days. Yes, even today the use of flash can improve some photos, but it takes skill to know how to use it correctly. One thing in the favor of flash at present is that there are tons of used flash heafds on the big auction.
To the OP, if you like the slower film better than anything else, get a swivel head flash unit. Otherwise I would go with HP5+ or TMY2. Or, as some folks here suggest, a second body. Those are the three choices I think that are the best. Now you're the one that has to decide.

Most people are conditioned to only think of flash as “that hard, flat with razor sharp drop shadows thing, that everybody hates”.
The mere mention of flash turns on a giant NO sign in their heads. “It’s difficult, clunky and looks stupid”.
Instead of a YES sign of opportunity and creative control. And first and foremost beautiful lighting with slow, fine, universal and cheap film.

Fast film certainly has its place. But should not be nearly as ubiquitous and often reached for as it is.
 
Last edited:

miha

Member
Joined
Feb 15, 2007
Messages
2,304
Location
Slovenia
Shooter
Multi Format
ILFORD XP2 SUPER.
 
Photrio.com contains affiliate links to products. We may receive a commission for purchases made through these links.
To read our full affiliate disclosure statement please click Here.

PHOTRIO PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Ilford ADOX Freestyle Photographic Stearman Press Weldon Color Lab Blue Moon Camera & Machine
Top Bottom