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MTGseattle

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I processed my first film at home ever today. Instead of making things simple (roll film, stainless roll, stainless tank, d-76), the stuff I'm used to, I went Paterson tank, Mod54 sheet holder, 6 sheets tmax100, and Ilford dd-x.
The negatives had been languishing exposed in the film holders for about 1 year. Aside from 2 sheets touching on the bottom edge, all went reasonably well. These were also the first 4x5 I had exposed in over 20 years. The negs still need to dry for a bit so I plan on getting them on the light table later. I'm guessing none are worthy of printing, but I may be surprised.
I know there's been talk in various threads regarding keeping chemistry at a stable temp. What I tried is a 15watt flat aquarium heater in a 6x13" by 6" deep clear food service bin with a bottom tray over the heater. Over time, this heater will turn 70 degrees to 75 degrees so for a simple water bath, one needs to start a bit cooler than desired. Since it's only a 15 watt heater, it can't really keep heating much past the initial 5 degrees of rise.
Was all of that necessary? Who knows, but I hope to launch into some color processing too and I know that temp is even more important there.
 
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Donald Qualls

Donald Qualls

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Was all of that necessary?

I've never bothered with temperature control for B&W, I just compensate time for temperature -- 4% longer per Fahrenheit degree colder than 68 F, 4% shorter for every degree warmer (7% if you use Celsius).

For color, I use a sous vide cooker -- run a tub of water a couple degrees cooler than target, start the sous vide and drop the chemical bottles in. Come back in half an hour, everything will be at 100F/38C, ready to go.
 

MTGseattle

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Nice. The sous-vide method is creeping into a lot of people's workflow. Since it was my first foray at home, I thought I should evaluate things a bit since I don't have a fancy "darkroom" mixing valve and all of that jazz.
The little heater I got was $9.99 and the food service stuff was another $8-10. I haven't looked at what a basic sous-vide runs.
I can at least streamline my process a bit now. I brought every graduated item I could find up to the kitchen.
 

Sirius Glass

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I processed my first film at home ever today. Instead of making things simple (roll film, stainless roll, stainless tank, d-76), the stuff I'm used to, I went Paterson tank, Mod54 sheet holder, 6 sheets tmax100, and Ilford dd-x.
The negatives had been languishing exposed in the film holders for about 1 year. Aside from 2 sheets touching on the bottom edge, all went reasonably well. These were also the first 4x5 I had exposed in over 20 years. The negs still need to dry for a bit so I plan on getting them on the light table later. I'm guessing none are worthy of printing, but I may be surprised.
I know there's been talk in various threads regarding keeping chemistry at a stable temp. What I tried is a 15watt flat aquarium heater in a 6x13" by 6" deep clear food service bin with a bottom tray over the heater. Over time, this heater will turn 70 degrees to 75 degrees so for a simple water bath, one needs to start a bit cooler than desired. Since it's only a 15 watt heater, it can't really keep heating much past the initial 5 degrees of rise.
Was all of that necessary? Who knows, but I hope to launch into some color processing too and I know that temp is even more important there.

I've never bothered with temperature control for B&W, I just compensate time for temperature -- 4% longer per Fahrenheit degree colder than 68 F, 4% shorter for every degree warmer (7% if you use Celsius).

For color, I use a sous vide cooker -- run a tub of water a couple degrees cooler than target, start the sous vide and drop the chemical bottles in. Come back in half an hour, everything will be at 100F/38C, ready to go.

As Don suggested do not bother to control the temperature of black & white chemicals, instead adjust the development time for the temperature.
 
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Donald Qualls

Donald Qualls

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Also worth noting for temperature compensation -- for developers with hydroquinone (D-76, Dektol/D-72, MQ Universal, etc.), don't go below 60F/15C, as hydroquinone loses activity precipitately and non-linearly below this temperature. For single-agent developers (D-23 or Rodinal) or those with, say, ascorbate instead of hydroquinone, this isn't an issue.
 

Sirius Glass

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Also worth noting for temperature compensation -- for developers with hydroquinone (D-76, Dektol/D-72, MQ Universal, etc.), don't go below 60F/15C, as hydroquinone loses activity precipitately and non-linearly below this temperature. For single-agent developers (D-23 or Rodinal) or those with, say, ascorbate instead of hydroquinone, this isn't an issue.

Also on the other end, do not go below 5 minutes development when the temperature is higher. At that point one must cool the chemicals.
 
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Donald Qualls

Donald Qualls

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Also on the other end, do not go below 5 minutes development when the temperature is higher. At that point one must cool the chemicals.

This is common advice, but didn't we recently have a thread on developing film in Dektol stock, ca. 1 minute dev time? The concern is, can you get the developer into and out of your tank fast enough to avoid tide marks and flow marks, getting even development, and can you time your start and end consistently enough (as a percentage of the total) to get consistent negatives.
 

Sirius Glass

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This is common advice, but didn't we recently have a thread on developing film in Dektol stock, ca. 1 minute dev time? The concern is, can you get the developer into and out of your tank fast enough to avoid tide marks and flow marks, getting even development, and can you time your start and end consistently enough (as a percentage of the total) to get consistent negatives.

I posted about film and not developing under 5 minutes. For paper I use Dektol and standardize on 2 minutes.
 

MTGseattle

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I decided to use an actual stop bath too (ilfostop), the time on the data sheet (from Ilford website) was 10 seconds. I didn't think I could fill and dump in 10 seconds without making an ungodly mess.
Also, I used the current Ilford in tank wash procedure which if I read the thing correctly equates to 3 fills of the tank. My 3rd tank still had some "tint" to it. The 4th wash was nice and clear.

Donald do you mess with densitometry at all?
 
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Donald Qualls

Donald Qualls

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Donald do you mess with densitometry at all?

I haven't yet. I bought a diopter set to get the +10 to fit my Pentax 1/21 spot meter, which I've understood can be used as an improvised densitometer (negative on a consistent light source, spot meter small areas of the film) -- but haven't gone beyond checking that the diopter filter fits the meter's lens.

I've been meaning to do full Zone testing with the films I use most for a long time -- but working full time with an hour commute each way doesn't leave much time for experimentation.
 
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Donald Qualls

Donald Qualls

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What's the smallest spot that will measure? My spotmeter has a 1 degree spot, and at 100 mm (in focus for +10 diopter) that's about 1.7 mm across. Trades off against ease of use, I'm sure, but I've already spent the money for the meter and diopters, and it should be possible to produce a controlled backlight with a laptop screen (maybe even a smart phone).
 

relistan

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What's the smallest spot that will measure? My spotmeter has a 1 degree spot, and at 100 mm (in focus for +10 diopter) that's about 1.7 mm across. Trades off against ease of use, I'm sure, but I've already spent the money for the meter and diopters, and it should be possible to produce a controlled backlight with a laptop screen (maybe even a smart phone).
Looks like it's about the same spot size.
 

Sirius Glass

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I decided to use an actual stop bath too (ilfostop), the time on the data sheet (from Ilford website) was 10 seconds. I didn't think I could fill and dump in 10 seconds without making an ungodly mess.
Also, I used the current Ilford in tank wash procedure which if I read the thing correctly equates to 3 fills of the tank. My 3rd tank still had some "tint" to it. The 4th wash was nice and clear.

Donald do you mess with densitometry at all?

I use 30 seconds to a minute. As long as it is 30 seconds that is enough but it is ok to go longer without a problem. I tend to let it go for 1 minute.
 
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Donald Qualls

Donald Qualls

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I use 30 seconds to a minute.

Same here. The ten seconds figure might be a minimum, that's all it takes to pull the pH of the emulsion low enough that development stops -- but staying in the stop bath longer does no harm (within reason).
 

mrosenlof

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I dump my (one shot) dev, fill with stop, invert 10 times, measure out the correct volume of fix no. 1, invert the tank full of stop another 10 times and dump, pour in the fix.

probably comes out to about a minute.
 

mshchem

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I remind myself that the "pioneers" used stop bath to preserve the hypo (fixer) as well as to halt development. I always use stop bath, it's fun. 10 seconds is enough to stop a sheet of RC paper in a tray, fully immersed and constant agitation. I go at least 30 seconds once I get it in the film tank, constant agitation, inversion, then drain. This usually takes about 1 minute.

I love developing film, good fun. Mixing up chemistry is fun too. Amazing how many different formulas out there.

I have the luxury of a utility room darkroom (the wife liked the closets, the large empty utility room sold me on the house). I run a small electric radiator in the winter, holds pretty close to 68-70°F, I don't like to go below 65 or above 75, I have my charts to adjust time when required.

I have a Zone VI temperature compensating timer I got with a load of stuff. I use it for print development. I don't immerse the probe into the tray, I just clamp the sensor next to where I store my bottles of Bromophen, everything is at equilibrium temperature wise. Works great. 2 minutes with most papers.
 
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Donald Qualls

Donald Qualls

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Continuing "breaking the drought" -- I processed three rolls of .EDU Ultra 400 yesterday. They'd been in the developing tank for what must be nearly a year, if not longer. I used the D-23 I mixed not quite a month ago, gave 7:30 for EI 400 (corrected for temperature of 22 C to 6:30) with a one minute agitation cycle, and marked three hash marks on the seasoning tracking label on the stock bottle (it's 2 liters, so it'll need 12 rolls to be fully seasoned and ready to replenish). I recall John Finch's YouTube videos on D-23 replenishment not recommending any extension of developing time as the developer seasons, but I'll go back and rewatch to be sure.

I completely forgot the need to prewash Fomapan 120, with the result that my developer and stop bath and even the fixer to a small extent picked up the green/aqua dye from the film. Won't hurt the developer, but it completely overpowers the indicator dye in the stop bath. And we all know that stuff's prohibitively expensive; I don't know what I'll do. (/sarcasm)
 
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Donald Qualls

Donald Qualls

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Okay, I'm glad I went back and double checked John Finch's video. Seasoning for D-23 replenished is only three rolls per liter, not six (so I'm already halfway there), but no time extension (other than the usual ongoing adjustments for contrast control). He recommends 30-40 rolls per liter before discarding 3/4 of the tank solution and topping it up with fresh D-23, after which no seasoning is needed (the 1/4 of the original you saved provides the seasoning).

Based on his recommendations, then, I'll make up 1.5 liters of replenisher, and freshen when that's used up (should be about 68 rolls, give or take a couple, at 22 ml per roll).
 
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Donald Qualls

Donald Qualls

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Three rolls per liter to season is just about the point at which you'd start to extend development if you were using unreplenished stock -- D-76 and Xtol want extension in that range. The replenisher has a little more metol than the fresh stock, as well as the metaborate accelerator, so one you start to replenish, that isn't an issue.
 
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