Post your recent Holga 120N shots here~!

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Jeremy Mudd

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Man those are nice! I especially like the first one with the pier.

Jeremy
 

epp

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Man those are nice! I especially like the first one with the pier.

Jeremy

Thank you. :smile:

I also found two rolls of Fomapan 100 (blue box, expired 1996). I think that film will be the second roll I shoot.
 
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Jeremy Mudd

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Thank you. :smile:

I also found two rolls of Fomapan 100 (blue box, expired 1996). I think that film will be the second roll I shoot.

Do you have a cable release adapter for your Holga?

Based on my experience of shooting quite a bit of expired film, I'd probably shoot that at ISO 25ish with a tripod and cable release. Unless you go out on a really bright day, which of course may be the ticket. Good luck!

Jeremy
 

epp

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Do you have a cable release adapter for your Holga?

Based on my experience of shooting quite a bit of expired film, I'd probably shoot that at ISO 25ish with a tripod and cable release. Unless you go out on a really bright day, which of course may be the ticket. Good luck!

Jeremy

The Holgas do not have any ISO speed setting, I believe the camera manual mentions to use ISO 100 or 400 film.

I recently bought a tripod, haven't opened it yet, it's about one foot tall, but do not have a cable release. I was hoping to be able to use filters with it, but they have been discontinued and there's no easy way to use standard round filters. I read somewhere that it was possible to screw in a certain sized filter into the front of the lens, which would dig the threads into the plastic as it was screwed in, but if a mistake were made, that's it.
 

Jonno85uk

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I read somewhere that it was possible to screw in a certain sized filter into the front of the lens, which would dig the threads into the plastic as it was screwed in, but if a mistake were made, that's it.

I think the recommendation is to screw in a 46mm to *mm adapter (e.g 46 to 52mm) and then leave it there. Reason being 52mm filter thread is more typical and you're likely to have 52mm (or anything else) filters than 46mm.
 
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Jeremy Mudd

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The Holgas do not have any ISO speed setting, I believe the camera manual mentions to use ISO 100 or 400 film.

I recently bought a tripod, haven't opened it yet, it's about one foot tall, but do not have a cable release. I was hoping to be able to use filters with it, but they have been discontinued and there's no easy way to use standard round filters. I read somewhere that it was possible to screw in a certain sized filter into the front of the lens, which would dig the threads into the plastic as it was screwed in, but if a mistake were made, that's it.

Or you can get the adapter.

https://www.jeremymuddphoto.com/blog/2020/3/28/the-holga-experience-tips-and-tricks-ive-learned

I've also seen where folks cut a piece of PVC with the correct diameter and thread a set screw in it for the same attachment method as the filter holder I use, then they glue a filter ring adapter onto the end of the PVC. I haven't done this myself but the end result should be the same - to allow you to use screw on filters without damaging the Holga.

As far as ISO speed setting, that's my point about using the release and the tripod. If you meter for 25 ISO and the proper f-stop, on a cloudy day you may nail the exposure with a second or two. Most of the time I am never guessing with the exposure on my Holga's - I'm metering and doing whatever I need to do to get it right. It's a little counter-intuitive as to what they were made for, but its fun.

Jeremy
 

Jonno85uk

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In the last roll I used what I had experienced w.r.t infinity focus on previous rolls and backed off the focus slightly from the infinity stop. Turned out well.
2022-02-15-0009.jpg


2022-02-15-0002_01.jpg
 
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Jeremy Mudd

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In the last roll I used what I had experienced w.r.t infinity focus on previous rolls and backed off the focus slightly from the infinity stop. Turned out well.

Much better!

Jeremy
 

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I agree, vastly improved! A little shim here or there and you can avoid having to think about backing off the infinity stop on each distance shot.
 

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Just received back the results of the roll of Foma Fomapan 100 (expired May 1996), from a different lab. Taken with a different Holga 120N, but with a working aperture.

No light leaks on the negatives. I guess that means this particular Holga is also broken. :D

There were black spots noticed on most of the prints, which all have ½" of white space at the top and bottom of each print. Picture a landscape image, printed in portrait mode on a piece of paper. The 'spots' are also on the negatives and additionally noticed some at the tail end of the negative strip, beyond the last exposure (as exposure 16 on the negatives, 12 exposures were taken). When looking at a spot, you can see right through the negative, as if there were no exposure.

Because this roll was over 25 years old, I'm guessing that the coating on the film wore off over time, resulting in the spots, unless it could possibly be something else.

Will scan a photo or two and post separately.
 
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epp

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These are the same images, except taken with a Holga that has a working aperture and different film. Although the pier, is now gone. You will notice on both images, there are black dots in the image. I tried to highlight them with the Ellipse tool in GIMP, however the ellipse did not save with the image. On the negatives, the 'dots' are present, but are transparent, Given that the film is even older than the Kodak roll previously shot, I can only guess that the emulsion/coating began to wear off. The dots are present on most of the other images on the same roll. On the original prints, there is 1/2" of whitespace at the top and bottom of the images. This is how the prints came back. I was unable to successfully crop that and the rest of the whitespace using GIMP.

  • Camera: Holga 120N (newer model with working aperture)
  • Film: Foma - Fomapan 100 (expired May 1996)
  • Photo Developing/Printing: New Jersey Film Lab (Kingston, New York)
  • Scanner (at home): HP OfficeJet 3830

benches2a.jpg pier-gone.jpg
 

Donald Qualls

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Irregular transparent spots on the film, usually with crisp, sharp edges, are classic indicators for dust on the film at exposure time. This is a very common problem with older folders, as the 60-100 year old interior of the bellows may be prone to shedding flakes of whatever surface material it has. It can happen with any camera, however, if loaded under dusty conditions or left open for a prolonged time. Sharps tend to vary wildly; ranging from obvious fiber or hair specks to deeply irregular spots caused by dander, skin flakes, occasionally an identifiable big/arachnid, etc.

Round, even transparent spots are generally just undeveloped points due to air bubbles on the film surface during development. Large bubbles may assume the classic "air bell" shape, but smaller ones will have remained round. Their big giveaway is that the edge of the spot is likely to be a gradient, from full negative density to clear film, over a fraction of a millimeter.

There have also been reports of Fomapan developing emulsion holes during processing -- from my understanding, this has mainly been a problem when carbonate alkali developer was followed with acid stop bath; the gas formed during neutralization may cause a blister in the gelatin that breaks through to form a hole. These are most identifiable by a reverse gradient -- that is, density will increase (due to gelatin shrinkage) nearer the hole, until the sharp drop to clear film.
 

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Thanks for this info. The camera was not loaded in dusty conditions, in fact, the camera is brand new right out of the box and I was careful in loading it. I did not notice any dust inside the camera, it was clean. As the spots aren't round, it could be dust, but I can't see how that could be situated in the middle of the roll. I could understand something like that at the beginning of the roll though.

As to the developer, I do not know what NJFL uses for B&W films, but I notated on the order form that it was Fomapan 100 film.
 

Nicholas Lindan

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Look like fingerprints to me.

It's all part of the 'character' of 30 year old Fomapan. It could also happen at processing, I imagine the film was hard to handle and was curled up tight as a, er, enlarger head counterweight spring.
 

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I shot my first roll of Holga film in 25 years. Here’s a few shots that I liked.

3B0ED17F-EE4D-4EFD-BD99-4AE4AA6584CD.jpeg
478C0627-67C6-4D73-B154-9F4FB5D2471E.jpeg
6CDE3FD7-1F01-4CF4-8EDF-5B7DFAE5B1B2.jpeg
 

Donald Qualls

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Nice. Yours apparently has more field curvature than mine.
 

zloch1

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A couple of older pics from when I was in art school back in the mid 90s.

96DC93F6-37FF-441A-B766-3F6809FCD4A8.jpeg
397CDE59-42A3-4E3E-9FAD-0236026BDDA6.jpeg
 

Donald Qualls

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Those are closer to what my Holga produces. I wonder if your newer one has had the lens reversed.
 

Donald Qualls

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Is there a way to check?

The "Optical Lens" in a classic Holga is a plastic meniscus, convex to the world with the aperture behind. A meniscus actually gives "better" images (less field curvature, at least) if it's installed concave to the world, behind the aperture (this is how Kodak did it in their lowest tier cameras for decades -- even the Brownie Hawkeye has this setup as originally sold). It's been my opinion that installations like the Holga's were done to cut down on returns and complaints over the "missing" lens (because the lens isn't visible when the shutter is closed).

If the lens is reversed, it's usually kept in the same location (focal length doesn't change), but the aperture winds up on the "wrong" side, the convex side, which doesn't limit field curvature as it does when it's on the concave side. So, if I Holga had the lens reversed, it would be concave on the front surface rather than convex.
 
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