The comeback?

Discussion in 'Ethics and Philosophy' started by marcofimages, Sep 5, 2018.

  1. Berkeley Mike

    Berkeley Mike Member
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    Thank you.
     
  2. Berkeley Mike

    Berkeley Mike Member
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    To get back on the rails, this thread is the frontier of re-establishing film.
     
  3. Helinophoto

    Helinophoto Subscriber

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    To answer on topic.

    I don't think film is coming back, in the sense that is was ever gone.
    What I think, is that it's in transition towards a niche.

    That does not imply that it will be small and insignificant, unless you compare it to the days of film-only.
    I would think that maybe 1-2 out of 10 photographers will be shooting film/both from this day forward (when we are talking about people that has some interest in photography above phone-snaps).

    But, this depends on the influx of new gear, old cameras are going pretty strong still, but they do not last forever.

    Anecdotal evidence? Not sure, but the main bulk of analog-related videos on youtube are from people under 30, which is a very good sign.

    Not sure how large format and alternative processing will fare in the future. Large format demands strange equipment and processing options that go beyond what most enthusiasts tend to venture into. Alternative-processing is hampered by ever stricter customs and transport regulations, as well as an increasing terror-paranoia. Ordering chemicals (toxic and potential dangerous ones) can get you on a list you don't want to be on.
     
  4. Ste_S

    Ste_S Member

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    I'd disagree there and say large format will be around longer than 35mm or medium format given the current status quo.
    Judging by the number of kickstarters for large format cameras it appears they're easier to diy/cottage industry than other formats. Glass plate doesn't even need the film companies to be around.

    Given that things like the Contax T2 are fetching ridiculous prices, surely one of the major players must be looking at launching a new 35mm compact camera ? Heck, if Fuji have still got the materials/processes for the Klasse they could start knocking those out again.
     
  5. Berkeley Mike

    Berkeley Mike Member
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    I see a marked tendency to over-value the presence of younger people into the craft. This is nothing new to any craft. How many times have you heard someone say "children are our future" in relation to just about anything. As to the most videos made by people under 30 idea...remember these are the kids who used to program our VCR for us oldsters. Perhaps they are simply more comfortable with video production.
     
  6. Helinophoto

    Helinophoto Subscriber

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    I don't get this at all.

    So, according to you two who answered me here, large format and old people is the future of analog then?

    Give me a break

    It is VERY significant that people between 20 and 30 (and younger) take up analog as a way to express themselves and spread the very idea to their peers, my experience is that they shoot small format to medium-format, I have yet to see someone younger fiddle with large-format.

    I am giving my impression here, the alive and present part that I see online (not on photrio, but various social media) is actually driven by younger people, not by people of 50-60 and above.

    Take that as a positive, the young are actually the future, they are also the ones who spend most money and set trends and is exactly what the film-community needs to survive as a meaningful business for film and equipment-manufacturers in the long term.
     
  7. MattKing

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    I think the youtube data shows more that young people are the future of youtube rather then young people are the future of film.
    It would be really weird if most of the youtube (and online generally) presence for film was old people, but that wouldn't have much to do with film.
    But I am heartened by the youthful enthusiasm for film seen on the internet, and think that it bodes very well for film. It just is hard to measure the effect and extent of that enthusiasm.
     
  8. Berkeley Mike

    Berkeley Mike Member
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    I see how you got here; not my intention at all. Let me clarify.

    My comment is that the analogue-is-growing supporters often point to the influx of "young people" as a major indication of growth. Sales people, vendors and manufacturers like to say this.

    No, this is a common event in most interest groups and what is happening in analogue is unexceptional. Statistically while their presence is sustaining, as normal fall-off of interest occurs it is not nearly enough to infill as current users ...uh...pass on. I've posted this data before.
     
  9. Ste_S

    Ste_S Member

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    I think you misunderstand me. As it stands with no one making new 35mm cameras and with film supply reliant on manufacturers who may be in financial trouble and/or trying to pull out of film, 35mm isn't sustainable in the long term.

    Large format is, purely because it's easier to cottage industry / diy.
     
  10. wyofilm

    wyofilm Subscriber
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    The majority of film photography videos on youtube is by a younger demographic (let's go with <35 yo), but it isn't overwhelmingly so. I can think of many youtubers who are more seasoned and produce content that regularly or exclusively shows film photography content. Steve O'nions, the Slanted lens, Shoot film like a boss, Craig Sheaks, Azriel Knight, Darkroom Dave (maybe stopped a year ago), Tim Layton, Trangent, Hood's photography (maybe stopped), and on and on. I am really missing others, I know. I just can't come up with their channel names at the moment.

    Actually, now that I think about the film channels I'm struck by a couple of things: more newer channels pop up than older channels drop out, the range of demographics of content providers is varied, too. It's male dominated, but not exclusively so. (I don't know of any older women with film channels.) Lina Bessonova has an excellent channel. These channels also span a wide range of experiences from newcomers, returners, to former Ilford employees (Steve O'nions and Darkroom Dave) and college photography professors (Trangent).

    Film isn't going to be a billion roll a year enterprise again, but the tea leaves seem to show that there is a resurgence of public interest in film photography. I'm happy about it.
     
  11. blockend

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    A few observations.. Until last year Poundshops in the UK sold film. The majority was sold to young people, based on my admittedly anecdotal experience. I suspect a lot went to re-sellers, student cities ran out as soon as it hit the shelves. It's difficult to say whether those who want to try the film experience stick with it, but I think the older demographic of this board is the exception. Most people my age (mature ; ) adopted digital with great enthusiasm and without a backward glance. Some of the take up is people who are surprised film still exists and want to try it again.

    What data there is suggests a steady rise in film use, but no bonanza. The aspirations are different now, you would never find a Leica M owner shooting out of date stock exclusively. Today, that is unremarkable. It's more of a scene now. I'm not sure how healthy that model is for long term film use.
     
    Last edited: Oct 12, 2018
  12. pentaxuser

    pentaxuser Subscriber

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    This paragraph sums up my worries exactly. It is an adventure, something new to try, even a little quirky and forms a phase. Adventures, newness, quirkiness, phases etc tend not to last.

    pentaxuser
     
  13. wyofilm

    wyofilm Subscriber
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    Don't worry, be happy ...

    Not everyone who tries film photography for the first time ever or the first time in a decade will stick with it. On the other hand, not everyone will quit it after year either. No one person can will film photography into a stable state...forever. This 'scene' or fad with the youth has been going on for a decade now, which means many of those 20-somethings a decade ago are now 30 somethings and still sticking with it.

    Or it could all end tomorrow. Then photography becomes everyone making their own emulsions and developing negs in coffee.

    The one thing I can say for sure is that it is better for me (and you, I presume) that there is a resurgence of some kind, instead of a decline. Enjoy the upside.
     
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