sycamore photogram "wet cyanotype"

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NedL

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A scan of what this looked like before washing is in the gallery. Here is what it looks like after washing and letting dry for a couple days. When it was first washed, there was darker blue within the leaf...as it dried, the leaf got lighter and the fully exposed area around it changed from a lighter cyan to a darker blue.

sycamore0002.jpg
 
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NedL

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It's really fun! There is a huge amount of magic printing out and this is easy and quick and costs next to nothing...
Today I'm going to try to make a "positive" of this maple leaf. I made the "negative" using Namias' Sepia, fixed in sodium sulfite instead of hypo:

maple1.jpg
 

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Nice! We have a specimen sycamore in our back yard. It's about 13 1/2 years ago, starting with a trunk 3 inches in diameter it now is well over a 18 in diameter. Wonderful shade and the peeling bark revealing white beneath gives interest in the winter.
 
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Thanks for the nice comments. Looking at John's cyanotypes before I went on a walk and saw the leaves is what got the fun started :smile:
The maple leaf positive cyanotype is printing now... we'll see what happens.

Namias' sepia is easy and does not use much silver, so it's inexpensive too.
If you have some small eyedropper bottles this is convenient:
A. 25% Ammonium Ferric Citrate
B. 12% citric acid
C. 24% silver nitrate

Use 2:2:1, for example 10 drops A, 10 drops B and 5 drops C. Just mix enough to coat the paper. Add the silver last and let the precipitate redissolve.
Print until midtones just start to show. More tone comes out when you put it in the wash, and more again when it goes into the hypo. It was neat to see the details of that maple leaf appear.
wash for a few minutes in water
fix for a few minutes in hypo
 
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NedL

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The past couple weeks I've been looking at leaves and my eyes are opening to the infinite variety.... even under the same tree they are all different and each one unique.
Here's the positive I made from the sepiaprint maple, and also a liquidambar one...

All of these are 9x11 inches on canson marker paper ( someone here recently said was good for cyanotype and I've got a couple extra 11x14 pads here )

maple0002.jpg


Liquidambar.jpg
 
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Sorry for the silly question: How do you get the positive print? You don´t use the "Pellet's process" for it...

Hi BJ68, To make the positive print, I contact printed the negative in post #4. The negative was made as a sepia print, which is supposed to work better as a negative than cyanotype.

The only thing different for the sepia print was that I used 5% sodium sulfite to fix it, rather than sodium thiosulfate. This was recommended by Namias to make a more yellow image for printing.
 
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nmp

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Not sure what kind of leaf this is. Printed yesterday. A positive cyanotype from this is exposing right now.

View attachment 212187

According to Leafsnap app, the closest resemblance is to Amur Maple.

Good series Ned. How does the leaf seem so transparent to be able to discern the details of the skeleton. A couple of times I tried with salt prints, all I got was a white blob. Do you have to use a fall colored leaf for transparency?

:Niranjan.
 
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... How does the leaf seem so transparent to be able to discern the details of the skeleton....

Hi Niranjan,

It's a lot of fun and honestly I'm just kind of goofing off and going with it. I think the Amur Maple is more red, these big leaves are bright yellow. I actually took some digi-snaps of the leaves and a couple different trees and sent them to a N. Cal tree expert to see if he can tell me what it is. It's a fairly common landscape tree around here. The one I'm going to post below was from the same tree... some of the leaves have lobes and others don't, even on the same branch!

From the start, I figured it was going to take a lot of UV to make an "x-ray" and see structure of the leaves. So these are all pretty long exposures. I've been putting the cyanotypes out in the yard in the early afternoon and then picking them up when I get home ( I'm not sure exactly how many hours until the sun goes behind some trees, but at least 2 or maybe 3 ). Then I've put some of them under my BLBs for another couple/few hours. I don't think I've seen a cyanotype yet that I thought was overexposed.

For the sepiaprints, I can't remember how long I put that maple leaf under the BLBs, maybe an hour or probably 2. But the ones I've done since in the sun have all been overexposed -- I can't make positive cyanotypes from them very easily ( but they still look neat even if they don't make good negatives ) One positive cyanotype I left under the BLBs for 8 hours and it wasn't nearly enough. Yesterday I left that one just above in the sun all afternoon and then under the BLBs for a couple hours, and it looked neat but I knew it was going to all wash out and it did. Yesterday I made the sepiaprint I'm about to post below, and only left it in the sun for 1 hour, and even that was probably too much.

The leaves have been yellow, light green and the liquidambar had green and yellow and red in them. The leaf definitely matters... I tried a green fig leaf cyanotype, left it in the sun all afternoon and then under the BLBs all evening, and it looked neat at first, and even after washing it was okay, but when it dried it became all white.

There have been surprisingly few failures... maybe I'll make a post with some of them. Anyway, the sepiaprint is a lot faster! I remember when I first tried sepiaprint thinking it was about twice as fast as salt, so probably for a salt photogram with leaf details, it will take a few hours of sun at least.
 
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nmp

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Hi Niranjan,

It's a lot of fun and honestly I'm just kind of goofing off and going with it. I think the Amur Maple is more red, these big leaves are bright yellow. I actually took some digi-snaps of the leaves and a couple different trees and sent them to a N. Cal tree expert to see if he can tell me what it is. It's a fairly common landscape tree around here. The one I'm going to post below was from the same tree... some of the leaves have lobes and others don't, even on the same branch!

From the start, I figured it was going to take a lot of UV to make an "x-ray" and see structure of the leaves. So these are all pretty long exposures. I've been putting the cyanotypes out in the yard in the early afternoon and then picking them up when I get home ( I'm not sure exactly how many hours until the sun goes behind some trees, but at least 2 or maybe 3 ). Then I've put some of them under my BLBs for another couple/few hours. I don't think I've seen a cyanotype yet that I thought was overexposed.

For the sepiaprints, I can't remember how long I put that maple leaf under the BLBs, maybe an hour or probably 2. But the ones I've done since in the sun have all been overexposed -- I can't make positive cyanotypes from them very easily ( but they still look neat even if they don't make good negatives ) One positive cyanotype I left under the BLBs for 8 hours and it wasn't nearly enough. Yesterday I left that one just above in the sun all afternoon and then under the BLBs for a couple hours, and it looked neat but I knew it was going to all wash out and it did. Yesterday I made the sepiaprint I'm about to post below, and only left it in the sun for 1 hour, and even that was probably too much.

The leaves have been yellow, light green and the liquidambar had green and yellow and red in them. The leaf definitely matters... I tried a green fig leaf cyanotype, left it in the sun all afternoon and then under the BLBs all evening, and it looked neat at first, and even after washing it was okay, but when it dried it became all white.

There have been surprisingly few failures... maybe I'll make a post with some of them. Anyway, the sepiaprint is a lot faster! I remember when I first tried sepiaprint thinking it was about twice as fast as salt, so probably for a salt photogram with leaf details, it will take a few hours of sun at least.

Thanks, Ned:

Yeah. Leafsnap is a hit-or-miss at times. But it's fun for a botany-challenged person like me...

Regarding the opacity of the leaves, I guess I was not exposing it long enough. I was simply following my standard time as I would on a digital negative. Looks like you have to expose the heck out of it. Is that why the background of the sepiaprint negs have gone gray or metallized (can't remember the proper term for that)?

:Niranjan.
 
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NedL

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Yep... they call it "bronzing" and it starts to happen after maybe 10 minutes in the sun. A sign you've gone too far if it shows up in the darks on a salt print!
Dave... :D
 
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NedL

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By the way, when I started this thread, it was only to show that sycamore leaf at the top which is the first cyanotype I ever made.
Kind of got carried away. If anyone wants to add more you're welcome to. I didn't really mean for this to become a "gallery" of my prints. Every image in this thread is on 9x11 inch canson marker paper.

sepia negative ( 20m in sun ) and cyano positive ( 8h under BLBs ):
combo3s.jpg


ginkgo biloba sepia:
sepiaginkgo.jpg
 
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I'm out of sodium sulfite. I'm going to try fixing the next papier sepia photogram in salt like pdeeh did... it makes an interesting and very pretty gold color. No idea how it will behave as a negative.
 
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