Nikon F3HP: Worth the hype?

Untitled

A
Untitled

  • 0
  • 0
  • 28
Black Bull (2010)

A
Black Bull (2010)

  • 0
  • 0
  • 55
Liz-Lith.jpg

A
Liz-Lith.jpg

  • 4
  • 1
  • 130
Stray (2014)

H
Stray (2014)

  • 6
  • 2
  • 170
Time #2

Time #2

  • 1
  • 0
  • 99

Recent Classifieds

Forum statistics

Threads
181,871
Messages
2,516,472
Members
95,433
Latest member
MrClutch
Recent bookmarks
0

Sirius Glass

Subscriber
Joined
Jan 18, 2007
Messages
43,783
Location
Southern California
Shooter
Multi Format
Yes, much better carrying around a large heavy lens for those times when you want ‘spot’ metering.

I use a Pentax Digital Spot Meter.
 

Sirius Glass

Subscriber
Joined
Jan 18, 2007
Messages
43,783
Location
Southern California
Shooter
Multi Format
So why are you telling people to carry a heavy long lens? Why not advise your spot meter?

I use the spot meter with the Hasselblad or 4"x5", and the Nikon F100 as a spot meter when I am shooting 35mm black & white.
 

Sirius Glass

Subscriber
Joined
Jan 18, 2007
Messages
43,783
Location
Southern California
Shooter
Multi Format
So why are you telling people to use a long heavy lens as a spot meter?

The F100 can be used as a spot meter. Adding a telephoto zoom lens to be more precise adds no additional weight, because the 28mm to 300mm lens is the lens I use the most on my Nikon cameras.
 

Huss

Member
Joined
Feb 11, 2016
Messages
7,950
Location
Hermosa Beach, CA
Shooter
Multi Format
The F100 can be used as a spot meter. Adding a telephoto zoom lens to be more precise adds no additional weight, because the 28mm to 300mm lens is the lens I use the most on my Nikon cameras.

The F100 already has a spot meter. And you are telling other people to carry a big heavy lens in case they need a spot meter?
I know you are tryin to dance around this to account for your first suggestion to take a big heavy lens along for the off chance that a spot meter is needed. Instead of doing something much simpler instead.

It’s ok. Gotta stick with it no matter what.
 

Moose22

Subscriber
Joined
Jul 1, 2021
Messages
988
Location
The Internet
Shooter
Medium Format
Sirius is less a photography advisor and more a performance artist. You can't take him too seriously.

I'm kind of surprised he hasn't told us to buy all the hassleblads. It took him all the way to the second page to say "Get an F100". He's been telling the "keep them away from the hoarders" dad joke for a decade.

And, on topic, the F100 spot meter is great as is. The switch to get to it is one of the F100's weak spots, though. Sometimes they go flaky and you can't get them replaced. But there's hardly a need to do anything silly, lenswise, to make it work better. It's as tight as the F6 or any other TTL spot meter.

And I thought the N90 HAD a spot meter. Am I wrong there? Nikon's website for specs has:

Exposure metering Matrix, Center-Weighted and Spot; EV -1 to +21 at ISO 100 with f/1.4 lens (EV 3 to 21 with Spot Metering)
I think one of the other features -- adjustable to the focus point or adjustable size of the centerweighted -- was what it lacked.
 

Huss

Member
Joined
Feb 11, 2016
Messages
7,950
Location
Hermosa Beach, CA
Shooter
Multi Format
Sirius is less a photography advisor and more a performance artist. You can't take him too seriously.

I'm kind of surprised he hasn't told us to buy all the hassleblads. It took him all the way to the second page to say "Get an F100". He's been telling the "keep them away from the hoarders" dad joke for a decade.

And, on topic, the F100 spot meter is great as is. The switch to get to it is one of the F100's weak spots, though. Sometimes they go flaky and you can't get them replaced. But there's hardly a need to do anything silly, lenswise, to make it work better. It's as tight as the F6 or any other TTL spot meter.

And I thought the N90 HAD a spot meter. Am I wrong there? Nikon's website for specs has:

Exposure metering Matrix, Center-Weighted and Spot; EV -1 to +21 at ISO 100 with f/1.4 lens (EV 3 to 21 with Spot Metering)
I think one of the other features -- adjustable to the focus point or adjustable size of the centerweighted -- was what it lacked.

The N90 does have a spot meter. Even the excellent F75 has a spot meter, and that camera is tiny and light.
 

rulnacco

Member
Joined
Mar 20, 2008
Messages
146
Location
Orlando, FL
Shooter
Medium Format
The eyelevel finders (DE-2 & DE-3) have viewfinder blinds to keep stray light out that may influence the meter unintentionally and the WL - and others, do not. So be mindful of this.

The DW-4 chimney finder has a black rubber "hatch" that closes over the eyepiece, which protects it when it's in your bag, and serves the same purpose as the eyepiece blinds in keeping out stray light that can interfere with accurate metering. At least it's *supposed* to have that bit--I see lots of 'em on eBay where they, and the rubber eyecup, are missing. I made sure to buy one with it intact.
 

Les Sarile

Member
Joined
Aug 7, 2010
Messages
3,109
Location
Santa Cruz, CA
Shooter
35mm
The DW-4 chimney finder has a black rubber "hatch" that closes over the eyepiece, which protects it when it's in your bag, and serves the same purpose as the eyepiece blinds in keeping out stray light that can interfere with accurate metering. At least it's *supposed* to have that bit--I see lots of 'em on eBay where they, and the rubber eyecup, are missing. I made sure to buy one with it intact.

I too have seen many missing eyecups for cheaper price but mine is complete. I have seen the results of light getting in the vf and interfering with metering with eye level vf so I would think a waist level type would be more prone to this when the vf is wide open. This of course is specially true when on timer mode and nothing to block the light from getting in the vf.

This is interesting to me as the F3 and the Pentax LX both have the meter cel in the mirror box but the LX does not have a vf blind as it is not susceptible to light interference. I suppose it must be because - unlike the F3, the LX sets the final meter reading after the shutter has fired and mirror is up and reading the light off the film.
 

eli griggs

Subscriber
Joined
Nov 15, 2005
Messages
2,322
Location
NC
Shooter
Multi Format
You do no need auto setting in your 35mm camera, in my and other's opinion and though they are heavier, Nikon F and F2 cameras are even more durable, if, well maintained, with good finders/meters.

If you are changeable, the Canon F1 AE camera finder and winder are perfect 35 mm cameras and you can have shutter speed priority, apature priority, and full auto with a camera that works mechanically with the battery removed and top quality FD (and FL) glass is very good and plentiful.

Whatever you do, reconsider the ditching of the Pentax 6x7cm kit, until you actually have had time with the Hasselblad, just so that format remains part of your active photographic journey.

Good Luck and Godspeed,
Eli
 

lxdude

Member
Joined
Apr 8, 2009
Messages
7,104
Location
Redlands, So
Shooter
Multi Format
The F3 HP is a fine camera, but give me a cheapo N8008s any day. It's a better tool. High point viewfinder for glasses wearers, motorized film advance, AE with AE-Lock, exposure control in 1/3 stops (I think), a true spot meter along w/ center weighted and matrix, takes AA batteries, user replaceable focus screens....it really has all the features one needs to take perfectly exposed shots, even in a hurry.

Yes, they look sorta blobish and not as pretty as an F3, not as "pro", but altogether a very fine tool that will never ever need a CLA. If it dies, get another one for $50-$80.

I have an 8008s, and I agree completely. It cost me I think $16 back when no one wanted film cameras anymore. The AF is very accurate, and works in lower light than I expected it would. It's fast enough for me, and I don't mind having the single sensor. I like not having markings all over the screen, anyway. I don't need AF- I just have the 50/1.8- but the focus confirmation is nice with other lenses. The metering options, built-in winder 😉, 1/8000 top speed, etc. make it very likable. The body is quite robust, and its being plastic is no problem for me. My only ergonomic issue is that my right hand is a bit cramped, due to the size of the grip. My only other issue is that it's kind of big and kind of heavy. Most of what I do does not need what it offers, so it will never replace my Pentax MX or LX. Still, I consider it a very competent machine, and I see why so many pros had them as companions to their F-series machines.
 
Last edited:

lxdude

Member
Joined
Apr 8, 2009
Messages
7,104
Location
Redlands, So
Shooter
Multi Format

lxdude

Member
Joined
Apr 8, 2009
Messages
7,104
Location
Redlands, So
Shooter
Multi Format
That's one reason (of a few) that I got rid of my Pentax LX but kept my F3. The LX does not have AE lock. Some people excuse that saying as it has OTF metering it would be impossible to incorporate AE lock, but the Olympus OM4 also has OTF and has AE lock.

Yeah, it's an odd omission. It should be simple to lock in a value, regardless of how that value is arrived at. I would use the AE lock technique quite a bit if I could with the LX, but I don't mind just setting manually. Maybe there was a philosophical thing about it, the way that Maitani was opposed to a shutter button lock on the OM-1 because you should always be instantly ready for the next shot. In my case, I missed more shots because I had unknowingly triggered the shutter accidentally so it wasn't cocked when I thought it was...
 
Last edited:

lxdude

Member
Joined
Apr 8, 2009
Messages
7,104
Location
Redlands, So
Shooter
Multi Format
They had no idea how they would suffer w age, and the LX clearly did not age as well as the F3.
Even the Leica R5 - which is of the same era as the LX - is a much more solid camera today!
It's the electronics. The later cameras are doing better. There were three distinct generations of circuitry. My second generation circuitry LX is hanging in nicely.
 

lxdude

Member
Joined
Apr 8, 2009
Messages
7,104
Location
Redlands, So
Shooter
Multi Format
The absolute crappiest part of any F3 is the LCD illuminator. So awful it is comical.

Someone at Nikon should have gotten fired over that. After being made to apologize.
That is the only thing on a camera that ever had me outright curse the designer.
 

lxdude

Member
Joined
Apr 8, 2009
Messages
7,104
Location
Redlands, So
Shooter
Multi Format
Currently the Minolta 58 1.2 is attached to it (most recent version) which just melts away the background like nothing else. See attached.








Minolta made some lovely lenses.
 
Last edited:

eli griggs

Subscriber
Joined
Nov 15, 2005
Messages
2,322
Location
NC
Shooter
Multi Format
Many successful photographers would probably disagree (Michael Kenna comes to mind) :smile:

The Hasselblad is a field camera, with a focus on birders, as designed by, Victor Hasselblad who was himself an avid avian photographer and, even the hefty "V" series 500mm C and C T* are able to be handheld and shot by photographers whom have put the time in to learn it's 'best practice's.

A monopod in the field or studio is always a good idea for fast changing camera positions, IMO.

That this system is a great tool for the studio is just that much more chocolate sauce for the brownie.

Cheers,
Eli
 

Huss

Member
Joined
Feb 11, 2016
Messages
7,950
Location
Hermosa Beach, CA
Shooter
Multi Format
….Maybe there was a philosophical thing about it, the way that Maitani was opposed to a shutter button lock on the OM-1 because you should always be instantly ready for the next shot...

I guess Maitani should have made the OM-1 with a built in autowind then, to make sure the shutter was always cocked for the next shot.
Or at least insisted that every OM-1n was sold with a motordrive.
 

sterioma

Subscriber
Joined
Jan 9, 2004
Messages
511
Location
United Kingdom
Shooter
Medium Format
A monopod in the field or studio is always a good idea for fast changing camera positions, IMO.
I agree.


When I have the luxury of going on a photo walk alone with the Hasselblad, I do take my monopod with me (sometimes the tripod if I envision long exposures).

Many times though I manage to use the 501cm handheld and with two dogs on a lead 😄
(I just try to stick to short exposure times).
 

Huss

Member
Joined
Feb 11, 2016
Messages
7,950
Location
Hermosa Beach, CA
Shooter
Multi Format
I agree.


When I have the luxury of going on a photo walk alone with the Hasselblad, I do take my monopod with me (sometimes the tripod if I envision long exposures).

Many times though I manage to use the 501cm handheld and with two dogs on a lead 😄
(I just try to stick to short exposure times).

My dogs remain perfectly still until the exact moment I trip the shutter. Uncanny.
 

el_37

Member
Joined
Nov 23, 2012
Messages
43
Shooter
Large Format
You can tell very easily if a camera was used by a pro. It will look like sh-t. If the camera looks near new, it was not used by a pro.

I worked with and also knew photographers working at dailies that were meticulous with their gear- you would have no idea that at least a dozen rolls a day had gone through their cameras.

Lots of newspapers also had repair accounts with Nikon- so even the ugly cameras had a chance of being meticulously maintained on the inside.

Like anything that requires tools- some users are heavy handed even with minor usage, and others manage to barely put a scratch on something that was used daily.

Some photographers see brassing as a badge of honor- others see it as a horror.
 

lxdude

Member
Joined
Apr 8, 2009
Messages
7,104
Location
Redlands, So
Shooter
Multi Format
Sirius is less a photography advisor and more a performance artist. You can't take him too seriously.

But you can always take him Siriusly.
 

NB23

Member
Joined
Jul 26, 2009
Messages
4,257
Shooter
35mm
I worked with and also knew photographers working at dailies that were meticulous with their gear- you would have no idea that at least a dozen rolls a day had gone through their cameras.

Lots of newspapers also had repair accounts with Nikon- so even the ugly cameras had a chance of being meticulously maintained on the inside.

Like anything that requires tools- some users are heavy handed even with minor usage, and others manage to barely put a scratch on something that was used daily.

Some photographers see brassing as a badge of honor- others see it as a horror.

Please do not confuse “Brassing” with “Zincing” “Nickeling”... Brassing is graceful while “zincing” is not.

I believe you meant Patina, and not all Patina is graceful.
 
Photrio.com contains affiliate links to products. We may receive a commission for purchases made through these links.
To read our full affiliate disclosure statement please click Here.

PHOTRIO PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Ilford ADOX Freestyle Photographic Stearman Press Weldon Color Lab Blue Moon Camera & Machine
Top Bottom