Nikon F my newest acquisition

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sruddy

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Just received this beauty from an artist friend of my fathers. It seems like a very well made camera and I love the smoothness and sound of the shutter. I have no idea about the metering viewers that are available so most likely won’t try one out unless it falls in my lap like this camera. The viewers look like a clunky after thought but I’m sure they worked well when new.
B2A7CE5B-AEC5-4D29-AD53-629A8A4DF71B.jpeg
 

BrianShaw

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Very nice camera; I’m sure that you will enjoy using it to make beautiful photos. But your title might not be quite accurate… I don’t think that’s a F3.
 

Sirius Glass

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Just received this beauty from an artist friend of my fathers. It seems like a very well made camera and I love the smoothness and sound of the shutter. I have no idea about the metering viewers that are available so most likely won’t try one out unless it falls in my lap like this camera. The viewers look like a clunky after thought but I’m sure they worked well when new. View attachment 324784

Enjoy in good health!
 

AnselMortensen

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Wow!
Congratulations!
That's a beauty, and looks to be in immaculate condition.
A great combination, the F and a 50mm f1.4
Cheers!
 

Jim Jones

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Nikon leaped into the professional SLR arena in 1959 with the F1 and a fantastic assortment of accessories, such as a 250 exposure back and a Polaroid adapter. Both of these made a removable back necessary, which some Nikon fans found inconvenient. The first 21mm lens was adapted from the 21mm lens for the Rangefinder Nikons, and protruded far into the camera body, making mirror lockup necessary. A few early Nikkor fisheye lenses also required mirror lockup. Efficient use of the mirror lockup required planning ahead to avoid wasting a frame of film. It may seem that I don't like the idiosyncrasies of the Nikon F: not so! A series of F1 bodies and accessories were my main SLRs for 50 years until digital photography became more practical. Usually I preferred the simple prism finder.
 

Jim Jones

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sruddy - If you think that neat prism finder looks like a clunky afterthought, wait until you've been burdened with the metering finders for the F1. I used one for a while, and eventually went back to an ancient Weston Master II.
 

guangong

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The reliability and quality of the Nikon F initiated SLR dominance in 35mm photography. And they seem to last forever.
 

Sirius Glass

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Nikon leaped into the professional SLR arena in 1959 with the F1 and a fantastic assortment of accessories, such as a 250 exposure back and a Polaroid adapter. Both of these made a removable back necessary, which some Nikon fans found inconvenient. The first 21mm lens was adapted from the 21mm lens for the Rangefinder Nikons, and protruded far into the camera body, making mirror lockup necessary. A few early Nikkor fisheye lenses also required mirror lockup. Efficient use of the mirror lockup required planning ahead to avoid wasting a frame of film. It may seem that I don't like the idiosyncrasies of the Nikon F: not so! A series of F1 bodies and accessories were my main SLRs for 50 years until digital photography became more practical. Usually I preferred the simple prism finder.

The first f/4 21mm Minolta Rokkor lens also required the mirror lock up on the SR1 and SR7.
 

benjiboy

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Nikon leaped into the professional SLR arena in 1959 with the F1 and a fantastic assortment of accessories, such as a 250 exposure back and a Polaroid adapter. Both of these made a removable back necessary, which some Nikon fans found inconvenient. The first 21mm lens was adapted from the 21mm lens for the Rangefinder Nikons, and protruded far into the camera body, making mirror lockup necessary. A few early Nikkor fisheye lenses also required mirror lockup. Efficient use of the mirror lockup required planning ahead to avoid wasting a frame of film. It may seem that I don't like the idiosyncrasies of the Nikon F: not so! A series of F1 bodies and accessories were my main SLRs for 50 years until digital photography became more practical. Usually I preferred the simple prism finder.

Nikon indeed manufactured the Nikon F in 1959, but Jim it was Canon who subsequently manufactured
their original F1 model in 1971. There never was a Nikon F1.
 
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a100

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Wow! Looks in amazing condition! Have fun shooting, what's the first roll going in?
 
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sruddy

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Lovely camera. Probably needs new foam, easy to replace. That was Top Gun in it's day.
I just purchased a sheet of adhesive backed camera foam. I went with 2mm and hope it’s a good thickness for most cameras. Looks loke the only foam I could find was for the mirror and your right it’s falling apart.
sruddy - If you think that neat prism finder looks like a clunky afterthought, wait until you've been burdened with the metering finders for the F1. I used one for a while, and eventually went back to an ancient Weston Master II.
No I actually like the look of the prism finder it came with, but I think the metered finders look clunky. However! I think I want a FTN finder. I have to many cameras with usable meters and usually only grab a non metered camera when I’m shooting medium and large format. What finder did you try and why did you dismiss it?


Wow! Looks in amazing condition! Have fun shooting, what's the first roll going in?
I have Kodak TriX 400 film I need to shoot so most likely a roll of it. I’m not real excited about having to use my phone or Sekonic for metering so unless I get an FTN finder it may not get much use.
 

mshchem

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I love the Nikon F, especially with that finder. The dream camera for press photographers in the newspaper and Life magazine days. Beautiful design, classic!
 

GregY

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[QUOTE="sruddy, post: 2635654, member: 88057"



I have Kodak TriX 400 film I need to shoot so most likely a roll of it. I’m not real excited about having to use my phone or Sekonic for metering so unless I get an FTN finder it may not get much use.
[/QUOTE]

The Nikon F with a prism finder is a work of art. These days there are many small meters you can put in your pocket that don't mess with that perfection...
 
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sruddy

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[QUOTE="sruddy, post: 2635654, member: 88057"



I have Kodak TriX 400 film I need to shoot so most likely a roll of it. I’m not real excited about having to use my phone or Sekonic for metering so unless I get an FTN finder it may not get much use.

The Nikon F with a prism finder is a work of art. These days there are many small meters you can put in your pocket that don't mess with that perfection...
[/QUOTE]

I really like the look of the camera with the prism finder. I'm just lazy and don't like the extra time and inconvenience to use an off camera meter. I have an EL Nikkormat and a FM3a which I would be more likely to use before the full manual F. Out of the three I like the FM3a the best because it has the most adjustments, nice size, and weight.
 
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