Light fogged film

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by blockend, Mar 2, 2018.

  1. blockend

    blockend Member
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    I have a strip of negatives that were accidentally light fogged. They're of no importance but the original image is showing through the heavy fogging, and I've been thinking about experimenting with bleaches to see how much of the fogging it would remove.

    Has anyone experimented with bleaching negatives retrospectively?
     
  2. adelorenzo

    adelorenzo Subscriber
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    There are plenty of well documented recipes for bleaching negatives such as Farmer's Reducer. No need for experiments.
     
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    blockend

    blockend Member
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    I've used Farmer's Reducer on prints often, never on negatives. I was hoping for pointers, do's and dont's.
     
  4. ic-racer

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    If the exposure time is too long, try smaller prints. Like 4x5" you can also get by with the lens wide open on small prints. That should give you enough light to print them.
     
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    blockend

    blockend Member
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    Just to fill in the backstory why a man with over 40 years in darkrooms manages to fog film, here's the sorry tale.

    I'd put a fresh 100 ft spool of Fomapan 100 in the bulk loader, slotted in a cassette, to discover the frame counter wasn't working. I wasn't sure whether this was because the film was slipping and hadn't loaded, or had loaded but not registered on the counter. Long story short, I shot the film but it wouldn't load on the developing spool. My first guess was the spool was damp - unlikely because I dry them scrupulously - so I carefully fold the loading bag sleeves and get myself another spool. Introduce the new spool through the sleeves and de-spool the "damp" spiral. At this point I realise there's a lot of film on the first spool, but re-load on the new spool anyway. The film doesn't fit. It wasn't a wet spool, it was too much film. Like 52 frames. Hmm..

    Like most such tales it was a series of small errors and miscalculations that could have prevented the final cock-up, but at this point stupid kicked in. There were two films to be developed and I loaded the spools into the tank. Except there were now three spools in the bag, which I opened to discover a loaded spool of film. I'd put one loaded spool in the tank, and an empty spool, leaving one full spool in the now open changing bag. As luck would have it the 52 frame spool with long tail developed perfectly, the 36 exp spool was the one exposed to light.

    I developed both rolls anyway, to find the second one unsurprisingly fogged. The surprise was the amount of original exposure showing through the fog, Hard to believe 1/250 sec can complete with 5 seconds of daylight. As I said, there was nothing important on the roll (I can remember) but thought it would be fun to see whether I could reduce fogging while leaving (some of) the original exposure intact. Also as a cautionary tale to newbies that time isn't always a teacher.
     
  6. adelorenzo

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    If you have the Darkroom Cookbook there is a section in there on negative reduction and intensification. (Highly recommended book BTW)

    Farmer's Reducer in a single solution is what is recommended for reducing fog as it will act quicker on the shadows.
     
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    blockend

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    Thank you.
     
  8. jnanian

    jnanian Advertiser Advertiser
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    hello blockend
    the only time i have ever used FR it was with dichroic fogged negatives and sheet film
    the film was dunked in and i counted to 15 then inspected the negatives, adn continuted until
    teh fog was gone then refixed and rewashed, no agitation just let it sit there .. not sure if you are able to
    do that with youu film ...

    good luck!
    john
     
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