I need SRT-102 opinions

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KerrKid

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I'm thinking of getting an SRT-102 to add to my SRT-101's and 201 just because I like the idea of being able to see aperture settings in the finder. The camera will be in exceptional condition and configured to use a modern battery.

What are your opinions of this particular camera model? Worth adding to my collection?
 

Sirius Glass

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I owned the SR-7, SRT-101, SRT-102, SRT-201, ... , X570 and X700 and are were great and I never had a problem with anyone of them.
 
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KerrKid

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There were actually TWO versions of the SRT102 -- PLUS the SRT102 was sold under different names. I have several of the original SRT102, and I think it is the best of all the SRT models.

http://www.subclub.org/minman/srt102.htm

Nice. So it looks like the mirror lock-up is the only difference between the models that are badged as 102's. Interesting. Not having a mirror lock-up probably wouldn't be a problem for me.

Do you like your 102's?
 

Huss

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Step up and get the real Minolta - the XK.
XK - is that a Jag-yoo-arrr? No, it's my Minolta.
 

Paul Howell

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Have a 101 and 102, other than the full information viewfinder other wise, not much difference, nice that you use a modern battery, I use zinc air in mine.
 

xkaes

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Have a 101 and 102, other than the full information viewfinder other wise, not much difference,

I beg to differ. Unlike the SRT101, the SRT102 has multiple exposure capability, and a built-in hot shoe. And instead of two flash contacts, it has one -- and a switch for X or FP. Last, but not least, a split-image rangefinder was added to the middle of the microprism circle of the focusing screen.
 

Helge

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The best Minolta in use overall is the X-700.
I have X-500, XD-7, SRT-101, 303b (same as 102) and XE.

If I had to chose one Minolta to use forever it would be the 303b.
It’s super reliable, repairable and very nice to use.

The SRT-102/303 has a special charm you can only really know by holding and using it.
The ground glass screen is bright and clear. A nice compromise between brightness and size.
Not as bright as acute matte, but probably ultimately sharper and more universal.
The film gate is individually milled per body at the end of production to match lens flange distance as closely as possible.
This as opposed to how many other manufacturers use shims to adjust.
This is more precise and is much more robust to disassembly and hard use.

It’s lighter and more reliable than the XE which is also a nice camera.

There is good reason why variations of the SRT-10X line sold for fifteen years.

Aperture Judas window, real double exposure (good for pre flash) and the retainment of mirror lockup (penetrating wides and astro photography) and x/fp switch is (fp is useful for afterglow phosphorescence) is a feature package that is almost unmatched in SLRs.
 
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KerrKid

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The best Minolta in use overall is the X-700.
I have X-500, XD-7, SRT-101, 303b (same as 102) and XE.

If I had to chose one Minolta to use forever it would be the 303b.
It’s super reliable, repairable and very nice to use.

The SRT-102/303 has a special charm you can only really know by holding and using it.
The ground glass screen is bright and clear. A nice compromise between brightness and size.
Not as bright as acute matte, but probably ultimately sharper and more universal.
The film gate is individually milled per body at the end of production to match lens flange distance as closely as possible.
This as opposed to how many other manufacturers use shims to adjust.
This is more precise and is much more robust to disassembly and hard use.

It’s lighter and more reliable than the XE which is also a nice camera.

There is good reason why variations of the SRT-10X line sold for fifteen years.

Aperture Judas window, real double exposure (good for pre flash) and the retainment of mirror lockup (penetrating wides and astro photography) and x/fp switch is (fp is useful for afterglow phosphorescence) is a feature package that is almost unmatched in SLRs.

High praise indeed! Looks like I can’t go wrong. Thanks!
 

rcphoto

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I have 102 I inherited. I never use it but I’ve always been fond of it. If you can afford to spend the money on it, why not just add it to the collection regardless?
 

BobD

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I have a 202. Virtually the same camera as the 102. It's one of my favorites.
 

Helge

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High praise indeed! Looks like I can’t go wrong. Thanks!

They are reliable and rugged but there are a few things to look out for and listen to though:

- Squeak when winding. Not just “a drop of oil” in the winder arm. It needs opening the bottom plate and lube of internal parts. Not a deal breaker, but needs attention sooner or later.

- Aperture follower being sluggish or hanging. Again a CLA issue. Not something that can be fixed externally.

- Lollipop follower not responding. A rather complex issue that you shouldn’t deal with unless you are really experienced.

- One of the meter cells being off. This is due to separation of the cell from the prism.
Test the top and bottom zone individually with a piece of paper on a black background.
Remember this is not at all a center weighted meter.

- Look at the red dot above the logo. If it’s missing someone has likely been inside. And not been careful. It can fall out on its own, but it’s rare.
If it’s filled with red lacquer, carefully dabbed, it’s likely a pro.

Don’t accept dings and deep scratches. There is so many of these that you can afford to be picky.
It also tells you heaps about the general attitude and mindset of the previous owner.
 
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xkaes

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I have a 202. Virtually the same camera as the 102. It's one of my favorites.

That depends. Just as there were TWO versions of the SRT102, there were TWO versions of the SRT202.

The first model of the SRT202 was almost the same as its predecessor, the SRT102 (model b), but it had the addition of a film tab holder on the back (the new film memo holder retains the ASA/DIN converter, but you can't see it if you have a film tab inserted) and a film advance window. Nice touches, but Minolta dropped the mirror lock-up feature. Two steps forward, one step back. The viewfinder and focusing screen remained the same.

But there were subtle differences as well. The previous model had "MINOLTA CAMERA CO.,LTD." imprinted on the top between the pentaprism and the rewind crank. On this model, the imprint is gone. In addition, the film plane indicator, which had been behind the shutter speed dial (on the right), is now placed between the pentaprism and the rewind crank (on the left). This was a smart move and makes measurements a little easier for those few people who use it. Last, the hot shot on this model is marked with a red "X", hopefully to remind users that the "hot" part of the shoe is only usable with X-synch, not bulbs.

In 1977, a few changes were made to the SRT202 (model a). This was the same year that Minolta introduced the first of the XD and XG cameras, and several of these features were copied directly from the XD and XG line. Perhaps it was an attempt to make the older-styled cameras look as similar as possible to the newer cameras, but it is just as likely that the newer parts were available -- and usable -- on the older cameras. First, there was a switch on the SRT202 (model b) to a black, plastic aperture ring around the lens mount -- replacing an aluminum ring.

In addition, the locking DOF button of the earlier SRT cameras was replaced with a non-locking DOF button. On the surface, this sounds like a minor cosmetic change. But the change is more than skin deep. At the same time, Minolta dropped the "meter off" switch which, in all previous SRT models, would automatically turn the meter off when the DOF button was pressed (when an MC lens was attached to the camera). The purpose of this early feature was to allow metering in "stop-down" mode with early non-MC lenses. That's why the DOF button on Minolta SLR cameras was originally called the "stop-down-metering" button. So with this switch, Minolta was cutting out a few cents in manufacturing costs -- and casting aside users of earlier lenses.

Also, the SRT202 (model b) only had X synchronization for flash use -- the FP option of the SRT202 (model a) was dropped. Look for the black, plastic aperture ring around the lens mount to identify the SRT202 (model b).

http://www.subclub.org/minman/srt202.htm
 

pbromaghin

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Seriously? You're asking US if you should buy a camera?

Just do it.
 

momus

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Like a Jag, the XK would be wasted on me. But, at least I wouldn't have to push it home.

Ah yes, the dreaded Price of Darkness Lucas "electrics" syndrome. When they run they are superb, and even today the E is one of the best looking cars on the road, or the shop floor as the case may be. A journalist at the time called the E Type "The greatest crumpet catcher known to man". A few people have put Chevy V8 engines in them. More reliable, more HP, but they don't sound right. The Jag engine is a work of art, more like an aircraft engine, because it basically is. I think they were the fastest production cars in their time.

I may get an SRT sometime. Rokkor glass is generally very good and I like old retro SLRs like it and Nikkormats.
 
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Helge

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That depends. Just as there were TWO versions of the SRT102, there were TWO versions of the SRT202.

The first model of the SRT202 was almost the same as its predecessor, the SRT102 (model b), but it had the addition of a film tab holder on the back (the new film memo holder retains the ASA/DIN converter, but you can't see it if you have a film tab inserted) and a film advance window. Nice touches, but Minolta dropped the mirror lock-up feature. Two steps forward, one step back. The viewfinder and focusing screen remained the same.

But there were subtle differences as well. The previous model had "MINOLTA CAMERA CO.,LTD." imprinted on the top between the pentaprism and the rewind crank. On this model, the imprint is gone. In addition, the film plane indicator, which had been behind the shutter speed dial (on the right), is now placed between the pentaprism and the rewind crank (on the left). This was a smart move and makes measurements a little easier for those few people who use it. Last, the hot shot on this model is marked with a red "X", hopefully to remind users that the "hot" part of the shoe is only usable with X-synch, not bulbs.

In 1977, a few changes were made to the SRT202 (model a). This was the same year that Minolta introduced the first of the XD and XG cameras, and several of these features were copied directly from the XD and XG line. Perhaps it was an attempt to make the older-styled cameras look as similar as possible to the newer cameras, but it is just as likely that the newer parts were available -- and usable -- on the older cameras. First, there was a switch on the SRT202 (model b) to a black, plastic aperture ring around the lens mount -- replacing an aluminum ring.

In addition, the locking DOF button of the earlier SRT cameras was replaced with a non-locking DOF button. On the surface, this sounds like a minor cosmetic change. But the change is more than skin deep. At the same time, Minolta dropped the "meter off" switch which, in all previous SRT models, would automatically turn the meter off when the DOF button was pressed (when an MC lens was attached to the camera). The purpose of this early feature was to allow metering in "stop-down" mode with early non-MC lenses. That's why the DOF button on Minolta SLR cameras was originally called the "stop-down-metering" button. So with this switch, Minolta was cutting out a few cents in manufacturing costs -- and casting aside users of earlier lenses.

Also, the SRT202 (model b) only had X synchronization for flash use -- the FP option of the SRT202 (model a) was dropped. Look for the black, plastic aperture ring around the lens mount to identify the SRT202 (model b).

http://www.subclub.org/minman/srt202.htm

Yeah, that’s right, I was misremembering about the 303b. I have too many of these. There is too many variations to mention or remember.
If mirror lockup for example is important to you, check the individual camera and don’t assume anything.
The stop down for instance, is one of the nicest stop down mechanics in a camera ever.
And even though I don’t use it very often, I am tempted to use it just for the feel of it.
An SRT wouldn’t be an SRT in my mind without it properly implemented.
 
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Sirius Glass

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That depends. Just as there were TWO versions of the SRT102, there were TWO versions of the SRT202.

The first model of the SRT202 was almost the same as its predecessor, the SRT102 (model b), but it had the addition of a film tab holder on the back (the new film memo holder retains the ASA/DIN converter, but you can't see it if you have a film tab inserted) and a film advance window. Nice touches, but Minolta dropped the mirror lock-up feature. Two steps forward, one step back. The viewfinder and focusing screen remained the same.

But there were subtle differences as well. The previous model had "MINOLTA CAMERA CO.,LTD." imprinted on the top between the pentaprism and the rewind crank. On this model, the imprint is gone. In addition, the film plane indicator, which had been behind the shutter speed dial (on the right), is now placed between the pentaprism and the rewind crank (on the left). This was a smart move and makes measurements a little easier for those few people who use it. Last, the hot shot on this model is marked with a red "X", hopefully to remind users that the "hot" part of the shoe is only usable with X-synch, not bulbs.

In 1977, a few changes were made to the SRT202 (model a). This was the same year that Minolta introduced the first of the XD and XG cameras, and several of these features were copied directly from the XD and XG line. Perhaps it was an attempt to make the older-styled cameras look as similar as possible to the newer cameras, but it is just as likely that the newer parts were available -- and usable -- on the older cameras. First, there was a switch on the SRT202 (model b) to a black, plastic aperture ring around the lens mount -- replacing an aluminum ring.

In addition, the locking DOF button of the earlier SRT cameras was replaced with a non-locking DOF button. On the surface, this sounds like a minor cosmetic change. But the change is more than skin deep. At the same time, Minolta dropped the "meter off" switch which, in all previous SRT models, would automatically turn the meter off when the DOF button was pressed (when an MC lens was attached to the camera). The purpose of this early feature was to allow metering in "stop-down" mode with early non-MC lenses. That's why the DOF button on Minolta SLR cameras was originally called the "stop-down-metering" button. So with this switch, Minolta was cutting out a few cents in manufacturing costs -- and casting aside users of earlier lenses.

Also, the SRT202 (model b) only had X synchronization for flash use -- the FP option of the SRT202 (model a) was dropped. Look for the black, plastic aperture ring around the lens mount to identify the SRT202 (model b).

http://www.subclub.org/minman/srt202.htm

The mirror lock up was needed for the f/4[?] 21mm lens. Since that lens was replaced by a f/2.8mm 21mm lens that did not protrude into the mirror area, the lock up was believed to be unnecessary.
 

Sirius Glass

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Seriously? You're asking US if you should buy a camera?

Just do it.

Just do it. Just do it. Just do it. Just do it. Just do it. Just do it. Just do it. Just do it. Just do it. Just do it. Just do it. Just do it. Just do it. Just do it.
 

xkaes

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The mirror lock up was needed for the f/4[?] 21mm lens. Since that lens was replaced by a f/2.8mm 21mm lens that did not protrude into the mirror area, the lock up was believed to be unnecessary.

Minolta made two 21mm lenses that needed the mirror lock-up -- one was f4.5 (the first), and then an f4.0. I don't have either of those lenses, but I use the mirror lock up for two reasons:

#1 -- for my Heliar 12mm f5.6 which needs it
#2 -- to reduce "mirror slap" vibration in macro and telephoto shots.

So for my purposes, the SRT102 is the winner.
 
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KerrKid

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Yeh, I'm shocked that you guys would give me the go-ahead.)) Enablers. All of you.

At least I've gotten a ton of good intel on the camera which is great. It's good to hear from people who actually own and use one.

If I buy the one I'm thinking of, it will look and function like it just left the factory. It will be more expensive than a snagging an unknown version off of fleabay, but a far better value.
 

pbromaghin

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I don't know the difference between all the SRTs, but you are taking the right route on this, getting one like new with updated circuitry. I bought a real nice, little used 201 for cheap, with bad bumpers and seals, and had it overhauled along with a battery update. It's wonderful.
 

Sirius Glass

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Yeh, I'm shocked that you guys would give me the go-ahead.)) Enablers. All of you.

At least I've gotten a ton of good intel on the camera which is great. It's good to hear from people who actually own and use one.

If I buy the one I'm thinking of, it will look and function like it just left the factory. It will be more expensive than a snagging an unknown version off of fleabay, but a far better value.

Our job on APUG Photrio is to enable people to exercise their GAS and buy equipment. If we did not then we would be derilict in our duties.
 

xkaes

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The only problem with the SRTs is deciding which one -- there were too many variations to list here.

How about the SRT201 RITZ camera model with a rubberized waffle covering like the ROKKOR-X lenses (there was an XK RITZ version as well)

ritz.jpeg
 

Sirius Glass

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The only problem with the SRTs is deciding which one -- there were too many variations to list here.

How about the SRT201 RITZ camera model with a rubberized waffle covering like the ROKKOR-X lenses (there was an XK RITZ version as well)

View attachment 326378

Buy one of each and then rotate through them every time you start a new roll of film. That keeps the wear even.
 
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