Has digital technology shaped the aesthetics of photography

Discussion in 'Ethics and Philosophy' started by Mainecoonmaniac, Jan 23, 2018.

  1. blockend

    blockend Member
    Ads Enabled

    Messages:
    3,753
    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2010
    Location:
    northern eng
    Shooter:
    35mm
  2. OP
    OP
    Mainecoonmaniac

    Mainecoonmaniac Subscriber
    Ads Enabled

    Messages:
    5,189
    Joined:
    Dec 10, 2009
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
  3. E. von Hoegh

    E. von Hoegh Member
    Ads Enabled

    Messages:
    5,939
    Joined:
    Sep 14, 2011
    Location:
    Adirondacks
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Year before last, I found a selfie stick in the woods. I didn't know what it was until a friend described it's use, I was kind of gobsmacked.
    When I found the thing I was carrying a '36 Contax II.
     
  4. OP
    OP
    Mainecoonmaniac

    Mainecoonmaniac Subscriber
    Ads Enabled

    Messages:
    5,189
    Joined:
    Dec 10, 2009
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    How about this?
     
  5. E. von Hoegh

    E. von Hoegh Member
    Ads Enabled

    Messages:
    5,939
    Joined:
    Sep 14, 2011
    Location:
    Adirondacks
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    That appears to be a telescoping baton...
     
  6. jim10219

    jim10219 Member
    Ads Enabled

    Messages:
    808
    Joined:
    Jun 15, 2017
    Location:
    Oklahoma
    Shooter:
    4x5 Format
    Either way it's great for combating slow moving, unarmed, attackers who can't take a hit and are willing to pause for long periods of time to let you prepare for your next move.
     
  7. E. von Hoegh

    E. von Hoegh Member
    Ads Enabled

    Messages:
    5,939
    Joined:
    Sep 14, 2011
    Location:
    Adirondacks
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Yootoob is full of...
     
  8. Ivo

    Ivo Subscriber

    Messages:
    50
    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2004
    Shooter:
    Medium Format
    The overall image quality found on analogue forums is in general dramatically boring. That is because a number of analogue amateurs are only focusing on the perfect negatives and or print. The content of the images is often neglected.

    It is not better on digital forums, but for different reason. (Image diarrhea, over processing and lack of photographic knowledge)

    In that sense, it didn’t change a thing. A huge pile of boring pictures.


    :smile:

    .......

    Of coarse digital photography changed the whole photography business and imagery

    Just as the celluloid did in glass era, as 35mm did, as the first zoom lens did, etc.

    Photography is a technical driven form of expression, technical evolution changes the outcome.
     
  9. blockend

    blockend Member
    Ads Enabled

    Messages:
    3,753
    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2010
    Location:
    northern eng
    Shooter:
    35mm
    Hard to disagree with any of that. One of the most difficult things in photography is developing good editing instincts. Digital made that even harder. I took an M43 camera out on snowy moorland this morning and shot 80+ images in about an hour. Maybe a couple of keepers, though all are perfectly exposed (1 1/3 stops over indicated, give or take). None I'd frame. If I'd taken a film camera as I generally do, I'd have shot around 15-20.

    If I shot digital exclusively I'd have tens, maybe hundreds of thousands of photographs. The number of keepers is the same, but the fillers and just-in-case stuff increases exponentially with digital.
     
  10. faberryman

    faberryman Subscriber

    Messages:
    2,442
    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2016
    Location:
    Nashville
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Why do you take more digital images than film images?
     
  11. blockend

    blockend Member
    Ads Enabled

    Messages:
    3,753
    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2010
    Location:
    northern eng
    Shooter:
    35mm
    Good question. Probably because I generally shoot people, and need the coverage. Digital allows for almost infinite shots from which to choose decisive moments - 30fps on the Panasonic.
     
  12. faberryman

    faberryman Subscriber

    Messages:
    2,442
    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2016
    Location:
    Nashville
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    I was asking in context of your snow shots this morning. You said you shot 80+ digital images, but if you had been shooting film, you would have only shot 15-20. Curious.
     
  13. moose10101

    moose10101 Member
    Ads Enabled

    Messages:
    843
    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2004
    Location:
    Maryland, US
    Shooter:
    Medium Format
    I shoot about 2x using digital vs. film, because of the immediate feedback and opportunity for experimentation. My keeper % also improved.
     
  14. Sponsored Ad
  15. Ivo

    Ivo Subscriber

    Messages:
    50
    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2004
    Shooter:
    Medium Format
    The only analogue technique I use is 8x10” on positive direct paper. Typically I make 2 portraits on one day.
    For my commissioned (real estate) work I use Canon FF and TS lenses. Max 40 shots per assignment.
    My family shots are on Instax Wide, 3 shots per family party.
    For the rest I use a Fujifilm x100f and xpro2. Someday I carry around the camera and take no pictures.
    Over time I became very picky on what I shoot. If not everything looks good in my mind, I rather don’t shoot. (This does not mean I don’t have a collection of unbelievable boring shots on my HD)
    Of coars, photography is a bit like football, you don’t have to score each time you touch the ball. The game on such is fun to play.
     
  16. blockend

    blockend Member
    Ads Enabled

    Messages:
    3,753
    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2010
    Location:
    northern eng
    Shooter:
    35mm
    It's a fair point. I spent many years taking highly composed shots with a tight rein on the shutter. Looking back, while I like many of those shots and have them framed around the house, some of the most interesting stuff was shot casually, finishing a film or whatever. So for me it's important to make a place where happy accidents can take place, and that means not being too prescriptive regarding subject or technique.

    Like any creative pursuit, photography demands technical proficiency and an understanding of its rules, but to move on means throwing them away or at least putting them in context. One example: last week I got a shot of my wife and the dog. We were out walking, she was on the phone and the dog walked ahead, unremarkable stuff. It was dull, drizzling and wooded I had 100 ASA film and was shooting at f2.8. The dog had climbed a hillock and towers over us, out of focus looking like a stag. It's a timeless shot, a keeper made so because I didn't have time to mess with the settings. A digital camera would have nailed focus and exposure somewhere, but the Kiev grabbed what it could.
     
  17. Ivo

    Ivo Subscriber

    Messages:
    50
    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2004
    Shooter:
    Medium Format
    +1
     
  18. guangong

    guangong Subscriber
    Ads Enabled

    Messages:
    1,014
    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2009
    Shooter:
    Medium Format
    After reading all responses, this is probably the most accurate reply.
     
  19. alanrockwood

    alanrockwood Member
    Ads Enabled

    Messages:
    1,187
    Joined:
    Oct 11, 2006
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    I think that the typical Joe an the street does not particularly like grainy photos. In that respect digital photos, which are more or less grainless, have probably altered the aesthetics of photography. Of course, digital photos taken at high ISO settings have a different sort of noise, and that type of noise is probably more objectionable than grain to a lot of folks.

    Maybe another things is that high dynamic range photos are becoming more popular.

    Also, panorama shots, which are easy to do on cell phones, are becoming more popular.
     
  20. jtk

    jtk Subscriber
    Ads Enabled

    Messages:
    1,466
    Joined:
    Nov 8, 2007
    Location:
    Albuquerque, New Mexico
    Shooter:
    35mm
    Since the effective demise of E6 (virtually no remaining labs) there's no alternative to digital photography. Kodak's "reintroduction" is a sad joke...pros shot most of the E6 and they virtually always counted on same or next day processing from now-defunct labs. Mail order processing may be ok for Grandpa, but makes zero sense for everybody else.
     
  21. faberryman

    faberryman Subscriber

    Messages:
    2,442
    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2016
    Location:
    Nashville
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    I never had same day processing of my Kodachrome and Ektachrome slides, and I managed okay. Since pros are shooting digital, lack of same day processing shouldn't be a problem. Don't film shooters always deride the instant gratification of digital, and carry on about how wonderful the anticipation of seeing your images is?
     
    Last edited: Apr 29, 2018
  22. Alan Edward Klein

    Alan Edward Klein Member

    Messages:
    392
    Joined:
    Aug 29, 2017
    Location:
    New Jersey, USA
    Shooter:
    Medium Format
    plus ça change, plus c'est la même chose.

    The more things change, the more they remain the same.
     
  23. jtk

    jtk Subscriber
    Ads Enabled

    Messages:
    1,466
    Joined:
    Nov 8, 2007
    Location:
    Albuquerque, New Mexico
    Shooter:
    35mm


    Kodachrome and Ektachrome were apples/oranges.

    Lack of same or next day processing for the MAJORITY of Ektachrome shooters was the specific reason most pros went digital years ago. The pro labs simply quit.

    Kodachrome which was mostly used by amateurs, who had no time urgency, didn't even know that Kodak itself offered next day service in our area.. When E6 replaced E4 the market for Kodachrome got even weaker . With good processing, E6 was at least as good visually as Kodachrome and Fujichrome took a lot of that amateur market (remember Velvia?...another film few pros used because it wasn't accurate and Fuji had processing issues Vs Kodak).

    Media Generalists, the chrome lab I ran in San Francisco was ran 60+ rolls E4 daily. Our clients were 100%
    professionals...we didn't want to deal with amateurs... we were third from the top volume-wise in San Francisco...at a time when the excellent nearby Kodak lab delivered next day to pharmacies and camera stores et al. The very few amateurs shooting Ektachrome back then were happy with whatever their pharmacy offered.
     
  24. slackercrurster

    slackercrurster Member
    Ads Enabled

    Messages:
    374
    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2017
    Location:
    L.A. - NYC - Rustbelt
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    OP, sure, each tech has their own look to it and / or +'s / -'s.
     
  25. slackercrurster

    slackercrurster Member
    Ads Enabled

    Messages:
    374
    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2017
    Location:
    L.A. - NYC - Rustbelt
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    The old Kodachromes are still around. Much of the Ektachrome has faded.
     
  26. slackercrurster

    slackercrurster Member
    Ads Enabled

    Messages:
    374
    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2017
    Location:
    L.A. - NYC - Rustbelt
    Shooter:
    Multi Format

    Digital brought us HDR...it grows on you.
     
  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies. If you have a Photrio account, please log in (and select 'stay logged in') to prevent recurrence of this notice.