Camera for a beginner!

The Rebel Bear

H
The Rebel Bear

  • 0
  • 2
  • 116
Great Sand Dunes NP

A
Great Sand Dunes NP

  • 5
  • 2
  • 188
San Jose Museum of Art

A
San Jose Museum of Art

  • 0
  • 0
  • 125
San Jose Museum of Art

A
San Jose Museum of Art

  • 1
  • 0
  • 130

Recent Classifieds

Forum statistics

Threads
178,611
Messages
2,456,856
Members
94,588
Latest member
perfectiontips
Recent bookmarks
0

forwhom

Member
Joined
Oct 29, 2009
Messages
14
Location
Hungary
Shooter
35mm
Hi to All!

I am totally new in analog photography. This technique is interesting for me. I am planning to buy a second hand camera. I need some feedback wich option is the best for a beginner.

I found these options:

1: Canon F1000N with factory lenses, with Sigma 70-300 1:4-5.6 DL MACRO
2: Canon EOS 3000 38-76mm Canon lense, + 100-300 Tamron
3: Nikon F65, nikkor AF 28-80mm 1:3,3-5,6
4: Nikon F601 nikkor AF 35-80mm, nikkor AF 70-210mm


Thanks for your help!

Bye,
forwhom
 
Joined
Jan 10, 2006
Messages
787
Location
Stockholm, S
Shooter
35mm
Hi forwhom
You will find that there are very much to choose between, and everyone will have their own favourites. Canon and Nikon are both excellent choices. Myself I use Nikon, but older ones without autofocus and cannot therefore comment on the F65 or F601. Most Nikkor lenses are very good. However, the lenses you list seem to be a little slow to me. You should be able to find faster ones, that is f 2.8 instead of 3.3 or 5.6. Fast lenses are easier to find if you do not choose a zoom.

good luck!
Erik
 

Rick A

Subscriber
Joined
Mar 31, 2009
Messages
9,051
Location
Laurel Highlands
Shooter
Large Format
Hi to All!

I am totally new in analog photography. This technique is interesting for me. I am planning to buy a second hand camera. I need some feedback wich option is the best for a beginner.

I found these options:

1: Canon F1000N with factory lenses, with Sigma 70-300 1:4-5.6 DL MACRO
2: Canon EOS 3000 38-76mm Canon lense, + 100-300 Tamron
3: Nikon F65, nikkor AF 28-80mm 1:3,3-5,6
4: Nikon F601 nikkor AF 35-80mm, nikkor AF 70-210mm


Thanks for your help!

Bye,
forwhom
My recommendation to beginners is always a manual everything, simple match needle metered, prime lens only, 35mm slr, and NO motor drive. learn the basics, then graduate to more bells and whistles as you become more confident in your abilities. The more complex the camera, the more time needed to master the controles instead of mastering the image IMHO.
 

Fireguy2002

Member
Joined
Oct 16, 2009
Messages
191
Location
Fairbanks
Shooter
Holga
Welcome. I'm going on my second week in analog myself. I agree with the other two. Go manual focus, manual everything. I myself went the Canon route. There are plenty of the "AE-1 Program"(different than the AE-1) to be had on Ebay. Most for under $40 and some with lenses. Like the rest of things on Ebay, just check the sellers rating and comments like "light seals replaced" "no mirror squeal". These two pictures are from my first roll through my AE-1P. It happens to be the second roll I processed myself. Everyone has their preference. This just happens to be mine.
Good luck with everything.
 

Attachments

  • scan0006.jpg
    scan0006.jpg
    250.6 KB · Views: 108
  • scan0011.jpg
    scan0011.jpg
    272.4 KB · Views: 112
Joined
Dec 30, 2005
Messages
7,174
Location
Milton, DE USA
Shooter
Multi Format
Wirelessly posted (BBBold: BlackBerry9000/4.6.0.297 Profile/MIDP-2.0 Configuration/CLDC-1.1 VendorID/102 UP.Link/6.3.0.0.0)

And for the matter don't rule out the Minolta sr and x series cameras and the great Pentaxes like the K1000. Great cameras and more bang for your buck.
 

Fireguy2002

Member
Joined
Oct 16, 2009
Messages
191
Location
Fairbanks
Shooter
Holga
Did I mention everyone has their own preference?
 

Mark Fisher

Member
Joined
Dec 13, 2003
Messages
1,691
Location
Chicago
Shooter
Medium Format
Honestly, it doesn't matter which camera you go with as long as it allows easy manual use. What matters more is that you try a fast prime lens. Everyone, autofocus or not, has a fast, inexpensive 50mm lens. You learn a lot by using a simple lens like that..plus the quality is better!
 

WetMogwai

Member
Joined
Oct 29, 2009
Messages
152
Shooter
Multi Format
I wouldn't recommend any of those for a beginner. Get a simple rangefinder, like a Canonette or a Minolta HiMatic. Consider a Mamiya 6 or 7 if you want to go medium format. They allow you to get the shot without worrying about what lens you have. There is no missing shots because you are changing lenses. They often have all manual operation with the option of auto exposure, but focus is always manual. They also allow you to shoot al lower shutter speeds because they have no mirror to cause vibration. When I'm shooting 35mm, I'm usually using a rangefinder. Lately, it has been an Olympus XA.

Of course, if you want to shoot fast action, like sports, pets, and children, get an SLR. I like my Canon Elan IIe. I can make it all manual if I like or let it do all the focus and exposure work. The lens mount is the same as the current one, so all the lenses they still make work with it.
 

Fireguy2002

Member
Joined
Oct 16, 2009
Messages
191
Location
Fairbanks
Shooter
Holga
I was only going with what a large number of people learn on(HS/college photography classes). Plus it's the one I've been learning on, and it works. If you want to stay simple, stay digital.
 

Joe Grodis

Member
Joined
Nov 29, 2008
Messages
201
Location
Wyoming, PA
Shooter
Medium Format
The best way to learn photography is to go strictly manual at first. I'd suggest a manual Nikon of sorts that takes the F mount lens. Now keep in mind the the Nikon F-mount lens "system" is the most successful lens mount of all time. Therefore... your lens selection is superior to "Anything" else. If cost is an issue look for a Nikon EM if you have a "few" extra dollars look for the Nikon FM3a.
 

Fireguy2002

Member
Joined
Oct 16, 2009
Messages
191
Location
Fairbanks
Shooter
Holga
I'm in Fairbanks, AK and there's not a whole lot of cameras/lenses sold north of here. I've done very well finding FD and FDn mount lenses for the A-series. I also spent $55 for an AV-1, AE-1P and three lenses. Aside from operator error, my photos have been great.
 

bobwysiwyg

Subscriber
Joined
Mar 28, 2008
Messages
1,628
Location
Ann Arbor, M
Shooter
Multi Format
My recommendation to beginners is always a manual everything, simple match needle metered, prime lens only, 35mm slr, and NO motor drive. learn the basics, then graduate to more bells and whistles as you become more confident in your abilities. The more complex the camera, the more time needed to master the controles instead of mastering the image IMHO.

+1 on this as a recommendation. I might even go one step further and suggest a totally manual camera plus a simple hand-held meter as it makes you think about setting various aspects of the camera for the shot. However, I can see that some sort of in-cam match needle, etc. makes for a more compact kit.
 

Simplicius

Subscriber
Joined
Feb 21, 2008
Messages
224
Location
Dublin Ireland
Shooter
Analog
pick up a Fujica ST705 or one of the earlier versions. which are fully manual, very cheap second hand and a great robust camera. They usually have fujinon EBC lens in M42 mount, this is great glass and for future use there are loads of cheap lenses fit it
 

mrmekon

Member
Joined
Apr 11, 2009
Messages
47
Location
Atlanta, GA
Shooter
35mm
I started with only a slow zoom (35-210, f/4). My first lens purchase was a 28mm f/2.8 and a 50mm f/1.4, and I found that the 50/1.4 ended up being *the* change that moved me from occasionally taking pictures to always having a camera. The ability to shoot in low light without having to push-process the film was extremely, extremely beneficial. I back everyone above who recommended a manual camera with a fast prime.

I like Minolta, since they're just as high quality but can be had a little cheaper, but I also have a Canon AE-1 and AL-1 which are both very nice.
 

Jeff Kubach

Member
Joined
Sep 29, 2007
Messages
6,913
Location
Richmond VA.
Shooter
Multi Format
Those cameras you mention are good choices. I prefer the manual cameras. I like the Canon FTb with the FD lenses. Good camera and lenses and at a good price.

Jeff
 
OP
OP

forwhom

Member
Joined
Oct 29, 2009
Messages
14
Location
Hungary
Shooter
35mm
Thank you for the replies! Now this is a bit difficult:smile: Looking eBay is OK but shipping to my Country is expensive. I am in Hungary. So it would be great to find a stuff where from the shipping cost is not too much.

And to tell the truth I am totally new as I mentioned. So I have very minimal knowledge on lenses. So I do not know what to do right now :D
 

glockman99

Member
Joined
Mar 15, 2009
Messages
138
Location
Aberdeen, WA
Shooter
35mm
Listen to me...I'm 55 years old, and have been into photography for longer than most people have been alive. Get yourself a Nikon FM2 or a FE2, along with a Nikkor 50mm f/1.8 or f/2 AI lens, and alot of 200 ISO film.
 

Andrew Horodysky

Canon AE-1, Nikon FM, Pentax K1000, among others. I also agree with the mention of a rangefinder Canonette. Use a dedicated (Canon, Nikon, or Pentax) 50mm and/or 35mm to start. It'll let you concentrate more with composing/picture-making, rather than playing and fidgeting with a zoom. You can get great prices for these at KEH.

Dead Link Removed
 

Shawn Rahman

Member
Joined
Sep 10, 2005
Messages
1,056
Location
Whitestone, NY
Shooter
Multi Format
I know hell is coming to me for suggesting this, but I disagree that a manual everything camera is ideal for someone just starting to learn photography.

I would much rather suggest AT LEAST an aperture priority, auto focus camera, so that a brand new beginner can focus primarily and foremost on composition and the visual components of what makes fine pictures. Let the camera take care of the exposure at first.

Then, as expertise grows, one can slowly go manual, using the aid of the camera that allows you to do so.
 

removed account4

Subscriber
Joined
Jun 21, 2003
Messages
29,853
Shooter
Hybrid
my 2 choices aren't on your list ..
one would be a pentax k1000 and a 50mm lens.
they can be found used for not much money ...
and they are fully manual so you will learn the relationships between film speed, shutter speed and fstop.
their resale value as very good, since a lot of people look for one
when they start out, so if you decide you want something else after a while ...
you can sell it and get something else. i still have mine, it was new in 1981, and still works well.

the other choice would be a box camera ... yeah, i know 120 format film, and old camera ..
but a box camera will allow you to free up all your thoughts to shooting and composing instead of
fiddling around with all the mechanisms.
they can be found cheap as well ...

if i could get rid of everything i own and just use one camera
it would be a fixed lens box ...

have fun
john
 

fschifano

Member
Joined
May 12, 2003
Messages
3,201
Location
Valley Strea
Shooter
Multi Format
I really must take issue with that. While I have no quarrel with auto-everything SLR's, I do not think that using one is the best way to learn how film, cameras, and lenses work together. Yes, almost all of them offer manual overrides. But the temptation to rely on the camera's automation is too great to be ignored, and that only serves to reinforce the belief in beginners that shutter speed, aperture, and focus are matters beyond their comprehension. It does take a bit of work to figure these things out, but in the end it is worthwhile. Light meters can lie, and auto-exposure can be fooled. Autofocus is not always dead on accurate. When you do get to an automatic camera, you'll already know how and why these errors occur; and you'll know how to compensate for these shortcomings.
 

Darkroom317

Member
Joined
Mar 2, 2009
Messages
652
Location
Bloomington, IN
Shooter
Large Format
I started out with an AE-1 using shutter priority and have been the better for it. I now use my cameras in manual mode using the meter as a guide. I am also more aware of depth of field because of manual focus.
 

Shawn Rahman

Member
Joined
Sep 10, 2005
Messages
1,056
Location
Whitestone, NY
Shooter
Multi Format
Frank,

I don't disagree with anything that you've written, but I think we tend to forget how difficult photography can be. My chief concern is that photography should be as enjoyable as possible at first before it becomes skill or practice to be refined.

I started out with a fully automated camera (the original Maxxum 7000), and now use either mostly manual cameras, or in automated ones in totally manual mode (Nikon F3HP; Mamiya 645; Leica M7).

Everyone's experience is different, of course, but I feel that my initial enjoyment of photography would have suffered slightly if I was too bogged down trying to nail exposure, DOF, etc. Yes - the learning curve is not so steep for those willing to go beyond the help of automation, but I think perhaps that should be the next step.
 
Photrio.com contains affiliate links to products. We may receive a commission for purchases made through these links.
To read our full affiliate disclosure statement please click Here.

PHOTRIO PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Ilford ADOX Freestyle Photographic Stearman Press Weldon Color Lab
Top Bottom