“Eastman 6 Safety Film” — any idea what it is?

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Trask

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I recently purchased a number of rolls of bulk-loaded film that was said to be Tech Pan. After developing some, I find that’s not the case — it’s (faintly) marked as ”Eastman 6 Safety Film”, lacks frame numbers, and has markings that indicate it was made in 1990. My poking around reveals that a film called “Eastman” (as opposed to “Kodak”) is probably a motion picture film, though a comparison of the transport holes to those of Tri-X shows them to be the same as far as I can tell. I developed some of the time in 510-Pyro 1:300 and got low-contrast images; developing the film in Technidol gave better images but only for those shot at ISO12 or perhaps 25. The film does appear to be very fine grained.

I’d like to know what this stuff actually is, as I have multiple rolls of it and knowing what it is might help me devise a better development regime. Thanks for sharing any thoughts you may have.
 

AgX

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Cine print films typically have the same type of perforation hole as still films.
 
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Cine print films typically have the same type of perforation hole as still films.

When you say "print films" are you referring to films that are intended for projection, i.e., a positive print from a movie film negative?
 

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Yes. Cine intermediate films in contrast should have the same perforation hole as cine camera films.
 

FOTO SOKO

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Hi Trask. Did you ever figure out what film it is?

I just developed a test roll of a bulk roll I got from a friend. It was also faintly marked, from what I could read it said "EASTMAN E6 safety"

Anything would help. I developed using HC110H (1+63), 10mins. I shot the roll at iso 25

The negatives look very high contrast and the film base is clear.

Thank you
 

pentaxuser

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I wonder why it has the letter and figure E6? Must have some purpose but might be something that has a meaningful purpose for Kodak ( Eastman and Kodak are in effect interchangeable here aren't they?) but not for users

pentaxuser
 
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I dipped my toe in these waters four years ago when I first got the film, but haven't really done much work with it since then. At the time, I recall looking for info on the film and wound up believing it is a low-speed film used in some part of the cinema process; I couldn't find any documentation on it. I do recall that one clue was the size and shape of the sprocket holes; there are websites that show them all, so one can look there and try to suss out what it might have been used for.

I have tried this film in three different developers: Technidol, 510-Pyro 1:300, and Ethol UFG. I've attached a few photos with each. It seems that on a couple of shots I wasn't steady or the camera was acting up -- I may have been simultaneously trying out a Konica Auto Reflex.

You can judge a bit from the attached images. Clearly this film has extremely fine grain, and it certainly dries very flat. For the 510-Pyro I tried a series of exposures at ISO 12, 25 and 50; with the UFG (5 minutes at 24C) (yes, Auto Reflex w/40mm lens) at ISO 25, 50 and 100; with Technidol (7'30" at 26C) I can't find any further comments in my notes other than I thought UFG gave better results than Technidol, despite in some cases being rather blown out.

I've attached some images that you might find useful. In a certain sense I think UFG (no longer produced) has, at times, a tonality that's a bit more appealing. (BTW, in the Technidol photo of the front door, note the mottling visible on door -- I can only wonder if Technidol has some problems with this film.)
 

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BAC1967

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I recently bought a few bulk rolls at a garage sale that both turned out to have Eastman in the edge markings. Both are black and white film. One is Eastman 34 with Kodak Standard perforations. The other is Eastman 19 with Bell and Howell perforations. I contacted Kodak to try to find out what type of film it is, they had no idea. They did mention that Eastman designation is for movie film. They also have the movie film date codes for the manufacturing date. These rolls were both manufactured in the 1960’s.
 

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