What is going wrong on my 6x6 negatives: a partial veil ?

Discussion in 'Exposure Discussion' started by WillCut, Feb 4, 2018.

  1. WillCut

    WillCut Member

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    Hi,

    I made some 6x6 films with my Minolta Autocord, which I developed myself, and I have a kind of veil (I think), but I do not know if it's due to the development, or to the camera, with a defect of foam seal, causing a light leak. But if it was the camera, it should be the case for all the views, right?

    I developed at the same time 2 films Arista EDU Ultra 200 in HC110, solution H, 1 + 63, in 9 min, fix in 10mn. One of the films is correctly developed, flawless. The other presents a kind of veil in the lower right corner (next 2 pictures):
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG].
    Similarly, I developed an Arista EDU Ultra 400 film with the same chemistry, and the result is perfect.
    And also an Arista Edu Ultra 100, with again a very regular wave-shaped veil:
    [​IMG]

    Would you know what could be the problem: quality of the film, quality of the joints of the Autocord (light leak), or development problem, or other?

    Thank you for helping me finding the solution.

    Guillaume
     
  2. MattKing

    MattKing Subscriber

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    Light leak - either in the camera, while developing or as a result of film handling.
     
  3. mike c

    mike c Subscriber

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    Don't think the camera, but the roll of film could have been loosely wound on the spool when taken out of camera and the sun got to it or film was incorrectly loaded on a reel for development.
     
  4. tezzasmall

    tezzasmall Member

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    Definitely a light leak from somewhere... Interesting that the shape of the light seems similar in each picture but they don't seem to be evenly spaced, which makes me think it's not the camera (but could still be).

    As some negatives have come out fine, I'm leaning towards the film rolls affected not being tightly enough wound when not in the camera and a bit of light has got in.

    But, I think you are going to try and eliminate one thing at a time to finally put your finger on the problem. To start with, try loading and unloading your film in the dark, some how, to strike off my thoughts above.

    Terry S
     
  5. ic-racer

    ic-racer Member

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    The curved area the impinges on the image looks like a processing defect. What do the negatives look like.

    You also have a light leak form between the spool end and the paper, but that does not impinge on the image and it is small, it is only on the rebate.
    If the film is 120, while it is in the camera, the film gate prevents stray light from exposing the rebate. The rest of the time, the spool is light tight on each side of the film gate.
     
  6. jnanian

    jnanian Advertiser Advertiser

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    looks like your spool wasn't tight or the film unloaded in bright light...
    was it tight and put back in a box or foil or kept out of the light
    when you removed it ?
    or when you LOADED IT was it in subdued light ?

    bummer ..
     
  7. winger

    winger Subscriber

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    Looks to me like a light leak that happened as the film was rolled up, so more likely was loosely rolled after being shot. If it happened in the camera, I'd expect to see it in exactly the same position on each affected frame. Is it worse on one end or the other of the roll?
     
  8. Sirius Glass

    Sirius Glass Subscriber

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    Light leak, probably from the film not tightly rolled. Do not use a rubber band because that will leave a mark on the negatives and result in another thread about a new problem.
     
  9. OP
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    WillCut

    WillCut Member

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    Hi,
    Thanks for your answers.
    It seems you're almost all agree on the point of light leaks during the removing of the film from the camera. And, I'm pretty sure you're right. For me, 120 film is new, and I don't know very well about keeping them after exposition. For 35mm, I put them into their box. May be I can found some dark bag (like for the B&W paper).
    How can I charge/remove the film in the camera during a fully sunny day without exposing it to the light?

    Finally, when I try to roll the film around the coil (I'ma beginner, and it takes around 6 or 7 mn before putting the coil into the tank and close it), I was in a dark room, with very very little rays of light under the door, and close to me. Could it be enough to create the light leak on the second film (the one with the regular veil)?

    Tanks everybody for your precious help. I will do things better next time.

    Guillaume
     
  10. MattKing

    MattKing Subscriber

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    Hi Guillaume,
    The backing paper for 120 film is generally effective at keeping light from the film. The trick is to learn how to be sure that it and the film are tightly wound on the film spool when you load the film and then later remove the exposed film from the camera. You must, of course, use the supplied tape to seal it closed after exposure in order to make sure it doesn't unravel.
    Even on a sunny day, you can generally find some shade to do this. If not, shading the film and camera with your body is usually effective.
    It is possible to buy re-usable canisters to store exposed 120 film in while you transport it, but anything that is reasonably protective and dry will suffice - even pockets and plastic bags!
    And as for loading the reels, it will soon get easy, but it helps to practice.
    To keep light from coming under the door consider using a towel. If the light doesn't reach the film it won't fog the film, but it is always best to eliminate the possibility.
    You are doing well. Hope you are having fun!
     
  11. OP
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    WillCut

    WillCut Member

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    Hi Matt,
    Thanks a lot for your advice and encouragements. I will keep and apply them.
    I will take more care from now for my process.

    Guillaume
     
  12. tezzasmall

    tezzasmall Member

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    A film changing bag can be bought new or second hand relatively cheaply and it would be worth trying. Then you could unload your film in total darkness when out and about to eliminate this problem to find out one way or another if this is the problem = loose film and backing paper.

    Terry S
     
  13. Gerald C Koch

    Gerald C Koch Member

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    Years ago I was at Busch Gardens and they had thoughtfully provided changing rooms- So as to not diminish the theme of the park thsee rooms were disguised as trees. I had to use one when the film jammed in my camera.
     
  14. guangong

    guangong Subscriber

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    Looks to me also as the result of mishandling during loading or unloading camera in bright light or sloppiness in preparation for processing. This is a reason Hasselblad has interchangeable backs. For my various folders and Medalist I ration my shots so avoid loading film in bright outdoors whenever possible. However, sometimes extracting completed roll while keeping tightly spooled from some makes of cameras can be a challenge.
     
  15. Sirius Glass

    Sirius Glass Subscriber

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    Usually I just head for the shade if possible, going inside is better. One does not need to be fanatical about it, just observant and careful. The more you can relax be better you will enjoy photography. It is supposed to be fun.
     
  16. paul ron

    paul ron Subscriber

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    light leak at the top left on your camera back.
     
  17. OP
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    WillCut

    WillCut Member

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    I've just developed a new film, again ARista Edu Ultra 100, and there is no issue on this one. I took very careful when I removed it from the camera.
    So, let's wait the next one...
     
  18. mike c

    mike c Subscriber

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    Thats great, if this happens again you will be able to diagnose it easier.
     
  19. Ces1um

    Ces1um Subscriber

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    Nice photos btw. I like the very first one shown. Looks almost like a lighthouse- what is this building?
     
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