What happens if I use none DX coded film in a point and shoot

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BADGER.BRAD

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If I were to use none DX coded 400 ASA film in my point and shoot what would the camera set at ? Would using 400 ASA film in stead of 100 ASA allow me to go from 1/125 of a second to 1/500 of a second shutter speed to help remove the problem of shake in low light in my other cameras, just trying to confirm my understanding is correct !

Thanks very much all.
 

Sirius Glass

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You will have to check the manual. The cameras usually have a default film speed. Look for the manual here http://www.butkus.org/chinon/ and remember to send $3 per useful download. This is volunteered work and time.
 

Cholentpot

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If I were to use none DX coded 400 ASA film in my point and shoot what would the camera set at ? Would using 400 ASA film in stead of 100 ASA allow me to go from 1/125 of a second to 1/500 of a second shutter speed to help remove the problem of shake in low light in my other cameras, just trying to confirm my understanding is correct !

Thanks very much all.

It's pretty easy to change the DX yourself. I do it all the time. Some black tape and a little bit of scraping will do it for you.
 

Gerald C Koch

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Simple point and shoot cameras do not even sense the DX encoding. They have a default shutter speed and that is all. I am assuming by 'point and shoot' that the camera is fixed focus and has no adjustment for shutter speed nor lens aperture. The OP is not too clear as the exact type of camera being described. A point and shoot can also be automatic everything. Just just point it and press the shutter. My Nikon N80 could be described as a point and shoot.
 
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Paul Manuell

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It's pretty easy to change the DX yourself. I do it all the time. Some black tape and a little bit of scraping will do it for you.
Maybe I've misunderstood, but the OP is asking about none (sic) DX coded film, whereas I think the tape or scrape methods you describe are used to get rid of the DX code on film that DOES have it.
 

pentaxuser

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As others have said simple point and shoot cameras may not even have the ability to sense coding and if the shutter speed is fixed or consists of two speeds often given by sunny and cloudy symbols respectively then all you can do is try and choose the right film to the light conditions. A lot of modern and more sophisticated P&Ss of recent vintage may default to a film speed of 100 if there is no DX coding. You can override the coding by scraping and taping. Do a research on this as one of our members recently wrote a useful thread on this. If I recall correctly he scraped away some of the black boxes or maybe only one black box and with a piece of electricians black tape he was able to move it to code the cassette at three different speeds. Of course you need to probably aim for say a 400 film which has the ability to work at one stop down and one stop up. You can't change the box speed as such but can make the camera "think" it has a 200 and 800 speed film in it. You then develop the film accordingly

pentaxuser
 

Ian Grant

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Cameras that need DX coding assume all non DX coded films are 100 EI as there were no slower amateur colour films available. It's a Wrens Nest question :D (a comment that will make absolutely no sense to people who don't know Dudley and the Black Country).

Have beer here instead and be happy:

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BADGER.BRAD

BADGER.BRAD

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Sorry I should have been a bit clearer I had the intention of using a higher speed film in my point and shoot cameras (one has DX coding all have fixed speed and aperture) so I could attempt to cheat them in being more usable UK winter. I can see the Wrens Nest from my Window Ian I'm in Upper Gornal where are you from ?
 

Wallendo

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Not all cameras default to ISO 100. Minolta, especially, deviates with one camera I own defaulting to ISO 200 and another defaults to whatever DX coded film was used last.
 

xya

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there are quite some p&s which use iso 50 as default for non DX, at least those from le late 80s and early 90s. so 400 iso film would be way out of the setting.

it's easy to fake a DX code even on non-DX films. the canister is made of metal. you scrape the DX area entirely from all paint. then put the patern of the desired DX code on the area. you can use any paint, it doesn't have to be black. even tip-ex works. and dots work as well, it's not necessary to paint sqares. look into your camera: you will see the DX sensors. it's just a question of contact to the metal canister or not.

btw: I have made a page for the advanced ones at www.135compact.com.
 

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trendland

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there are quite some p&s which use iso 50 as default for non DX, at least those from le late 80s and early 90s. so 400 iso film would be way out of the setting.

it's easy to fake a DX code even on non-DX films. the canister is made of metal. you scrape the DX area entirely from all paint. then put the patern of the desired DX code on the area. you can use any paint, it doesn't have to be black. even tip-ex works. and dots work as well, it's not necessary to paint sqares. look into your camera: you will see the DX sensors. it's just a question of contact to the metal canister or not.

btw: I have made a page for the advanced ones at www.135compact.com.

I don't think so. Cameras of "modern typ" - it is relative with "modern" I know - these cameras have mostly dx code support. (Because before - there was dx).
If you switch to rolls without dx code these cameras automatically set ISO 400. Because most films at the period of simple 35mm autofocus cameras were sold - had ISO 400.
SAME IS WITH DX CODE FILMS ISO 50 / ISO 800 FILMS.
This cameras just "learn" to have ISO 100 - 400 outside this range most cameras set ISO 400.
with regards

PS : You may find allways exeptions from this roule - of cause !
 

trendland

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I always wanted to do that (considering how much $$$ I spend on 35mm). Is the equipment to do it very expensive? Is it tricky to do?
There have been also "label dx codes" but I don't want to spent money for these labels - therefore I allways use a camera with manuell settings with bulk film.
The loader you need is 3 times more expensive in comparison of the past (5years ago).
On the other hand many loaders were sold in used condition for less (20bucks).
with regards
 

trendland

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And it is just "tricky" at the first time.
Most advantage to me is while shootings in color. Often I shot "nevertheless" a couple of frames bw. And a film 135-36 I exposed with just 17 frames ? I developed this rolls bw imediately - 2 hours later. ..
And the remaining bw frames ?
I wasted real good (but cheap) bw film in the past. Today bw film comes more and more expensive.
I use bulk rolls with 15 frames/8frames (special film) 18 frames/ 26 frames - just in the way I (suppose) to need.
with regards
 

elmartinj

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In my experience, olympus p&s rate non-dx coded cannisters as ISO 100, and pentax espio does ISO 25,
some folks say minolta does ISO 200. That'd be my 2 cents
 
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