Way to bend lens ring back?

Discussion in '35mm Cameras and Accessories' started by Hubigpielover, May 16, 2018 at 10:52 AM.

  1. Hubigpielover

    Hubigpielover Subscriber

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    I bumped my lens on a chair and it bent the ring that the filter screws into. Didn't notice it till I went to screw my yellow lens on it. Should I send it off to get fixed, try to bend it back myself? I'm worried I will boogie the threads or scratch the glass if I do it myself.

    Thanks
     
  2. AgX

    AgX Member

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    Self-repair would only work with slightest, hardly visible bending. And that would mean rebending by hand or similar.

    Otherwise, if it works at all, special tools will be needed.
    In the best case, unlikely, you yourself will yield a working but scratched ring.
     
  3. OP
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    Hubigpielover

    Hubigpielover Subscriber

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    Hmmming that's what I was afraid of.
     
  4. Helios 1984

    Helios 1984 Member

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    Last edited: May 16, 2018 at 11:14 AM
  5. AgX

    AgX Member

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    That dowel & anvil way likely would only work at mediocre bending. And still may harm aluminium threadings.

    Aside a well cut anvil, without a third hand it will need some hassle to fix the the rest of the barrel. I would shim it to height and strap it down.
     
    Last edited: May 16, 2018 at 11:21 AM
  6. OP
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    Hubigpielover

    Hubigpielover Subscriber

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  7. Gerald C Koch

    Gerald C Koch Member

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    There is a special tool to do this. Some look like a pair of pliers others more like an anvil. The trick is to go slowly so as not to stretch the ring. If there are directions for the tool read them thoroughly beforehand. After each use rotate the tool a bit so as not to stretch the ring all in one place.
     
    Last edited: May 16, 2018 at 12:30 PM
  8. AgX

    AgX Member

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    I do not find that commercial tool very convincing, am tinkering on a own solution.
     
  9. Helios 1984

    Helios 1984 Member

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    To be fair, I removed the filter ring before proceeding, it make things easier and eliminate the risk for the front element.

    Ps: In this particular case, I was able to remove the filter ring because there is no nameplate screwed in on this particular lens. You can’t do that with most lenses.
     
    Last edited: May 16, 2018 at 4:51 PM
  10. Old-N-Feeble

    Old-N-Feeble Subscriber

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    I used a system very similar to this many years ago when I still had fine motor skills but I wouldn't dare try it these days. I had 'arcs' of various sizes and sticks made of hardwood with various curved ends. Of course, that system only worked on minor bends.
     
  11. Sirius Glass

    Sirius Glass Member

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    You bent the yellow filter not the lens. I have the right tools and I worked on a bent lens ring and ended up scratching the lens. Let a repairman fix it or replace the filter. It is not worth damaging the lens or filter even if you are skilled and have the right tools.
     
  12. Old-N-Feeble

    Old-N-Feeble Subscriber

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    SG, I read it that he bent the front of the lens.
     
  13. shutterfinger

    shutterfinger Member

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    I've corrected bent lens barrel ends with a pair of needle nose pliers and a piece of rubber to protect the threads. The dings were only a millimeter or two.
    I did not scratch the lens.
     
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  15. Nodda Duma

    Nodda Duma Subscriber

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    I’ve successfully used a lens vice many times to repair dents just like you describe, both in and out of the optical shop. They are much cheaper than your lens, and — most importantly — don’t require a finely honed technique or experience.
     
  16. BradS

    BradS Subscriber

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    I guess it depends on what lens it is. If it is something commonly available on the used market and not too expensive, I would just buy another one in better condition. The bent one could be sold on eBay, with the ding clearly disclosed and photographed. If, on the other hand, it is an uncommon or expensive lens, then certainly I'd send it to a reputable shop to be repaired. The repairman will disassemble the lens, clean it and put it back together with the bent parts replaced by new parts (or used parts in excellent condition). I'd call around before just sending it blindly to a shop tho.

    I'd never attempt to repair a bent filter ring by bending it back....either its worth getting done right or it isn't. If its not worth getting done right....just buy another. I might, however, venture to disassemble the lens myself to see if I could replace the bent parts....just to learn something.
     
    Last edited: May 16, 2018 at 7:42 PM
  17. Sirius Glass

    Sirius Glass Member

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    My advise is still the same.
     
  18. dxqcanada

    dxqcanada Member

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    I have used the lens ring vise and the wood dowel technique ... I will have to say the wood is the better way.
     
  19. mshchem

    mshchem Member

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    Yikes, I think wood would be best. But there's people that "have a particular set of skills " pay a professional.
     
  20. albada

    albada Member

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    I've done that wooden-dowel-in-a-cutout trick many times, and I'll testify that it works well. File the end of the dowel to match the ring's curvature. You can tap a small dent in its middle, but for a long dent, it's best to start at the ends and work inward. Starting at the middle of a long dent will cause you to put a dent in the dent, making the final straightening more difficult.

    Mark Overton
     
  21. mshchem

    mshchem Member

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    I've only dropped a camera once. My first SLR a Pentax SP 500. Broke the UV filter. Since then, 1st thing I do on every lens is put a good UV filter and a strap .I standardized all my cameras to Tamrac straps with quick release. Allowed easy removal of the strap when using a tripod.

    I'm sure the dowel and curved block thing would work. I hope I don’t need to try :smile:
     
  22. AgX

    AgX Member

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    Quite some people though tried to bend the ring back into shape by using pliers, with the result of making things worse.
     
  23. devb

    devb Member

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    I bent a filter ring so badly once that I wound up cutting the bent section out with a small hacksaw and screwed and empty filter ring into the remaining threads, making the edges light tight with black gaffers tape. Electrical tape would probably work too. Empty filter rings are very cheap: http://www.emptyfilterrings.com/
     
  24. Helios 1984

    Helios 1984 Member

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    Could you post a picture of the aforementioned filter ring?
     
  25. devb

    devb Member

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    I could in a few hours. It just looks like I have a filter with no glass taped onto the lens.
     
  26. AgX

    AgX Member

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    Milling out a bent section is the last resort. And to hold a filter likely only 2/3 of the circumference is needed, thus it would work without an addtional thread, that second thread is held so anyway.
     
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