Using a PC flash with a Kodak Signet 50

Discussion in '35mm Cameras and Accessories' started by Cholentpot, Jun 11, 2017.

  1. shutterfinger

    shutterfinger Subscriber

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    Heat shrink tubing is better than tape. Its available in small quantities at Lowe's and possibly Home Depot.
     
  2. darkroommike

    darkroommike Subscriber

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    Manual says "X" at all speeds.
     
  3. OP
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    Cholentpot

    Cholentpot Member

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    Oh yes, that stuff is amazing. I tend to forgot to put it on and remember after I solder the joint.
     
  4. 1L6E6VHF

    1L6E6VHF Member

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    If you're referring to the small 15 volt battery required in a B-C flashgun, you can use a little alkaline 12V garage door opener/cigarette lighter battery with a spring or a wad of foil to make up for the shorter 12V battery (12 volts being more than adequate).

    If you're trying to replace red label "photoflash" batteries of sizes AAA, AA or C, just use alkalines of the same size. Alkalines made photoflash batteries (carbon-zinc with very minor changes to ordinary dry cells) obsolete.
     
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    Cholentpot

    Cholentpot Member

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    Yeah it's the small 15 volt battery that has I guess a capacitor next to it? Does the capacitor need to be replaced too? It also has uses big flashbulbs. I have about 10 of these large bulbs that came with a camera. The flash unit has what looks like regular wall socket with a PC cable dangling out of it.

    Energizer A27 makes sense? Exell Battery A220 I found on ebay is 15 volt.
     
  6. 1L6E6VHF

    1L6E6VHF Member

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    USUALLY the existing capacitor would be fine. It was NOT replaced on a regular basis (i.e., you usually kept the same capacitor in place when changing the battery).

    That being said, electrolytic capacitors do have a tendency to lose the ability to hold a charge over decades . That would not be so bad were it not for the fact that if you have a B-C flashgun, it is probably decades old.

    If the flashbulb won't fire, or if you find that a fresh battery has lost its power after storing the flashgun, you can replace the capacitor with a new electrolytic capacitor (of about the same capacity, measured in microfarads, and A voltage rating as high or higher than that of the battery you will be using
     
  7. Bud Hamblen

    Bud Hamblen Subscriber

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    The screw on a Kodalite flash is a US #10-24 size and screws into the middle hole on the camera. The pin on the flash goes into the bottom hole on the camera. The top pin on the camera is connected to nothing. When the shutter opens the bottom pin is electrically connected to the screw, completing the circuit and firing the flash. A 1/30 shutter speed has the shutter open 33 milliseconds, which probably was enough time for the flashbulb to light up.

    The Signet 80 (a fancier camera than the Signet 50) has both a Kodalite connector and a PC socket for electronic flash, but no M/X switch.
     
  8. Chan Tran

    Chan Tran Member

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    I would first use an ohm meter to check the sync first. I think the holes are about the right size to plug a banana plug in. If so you can attach the sync cord to a couple of banana plugs.
     
  9. AgX

    AgX Member

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    Why would you use an Ohm-meter to check the synchro-circuit?
    I mean, I got a lot of meters and stuff, but hanging on the flash would be sufficient to check. Or do you mean that by using a meter first one would spare making a custom wiring in case the synch would not work?
     
  10. Chan Tran

    Chan Tran Member

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    Since it's not easy to simply attach a flash. I would check if it make contact when the shutter is released first before making the cable.