Trying to appreciate the value of street photography

Discussion in 'Street' started by ted_smith, Oct 27, 2018.

  1. Alan Edward Klein

    Alan Edward Klein Member

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  2. Ste_S

    Ste_S Member

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    I take mine with me all the time if I'm commuting by walking/public transport. Took some of my favourite photos on the way to/from work and also on my lunch break.
     
  3. guangong

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    “Street photography”, that is genuine street photography, is probably the most difficult of all of photography. The world must be taken as it is...no posing of subjects, light conditions, weather , etc are given and from this the ability to create a photograph that is strengthened by dymanic composition and subject is not easy.
    Since much of my “street photography” takes place in rural areas, musical venues and bars as well as urban places, my definition of street photography is rather broad.
    Ko.Fe. Is right on. The streets now have the homogeneous character of malls. Walked across Bleeker St in NYC about two weeks ago. Haven’t been in neighbored for a few years. Every storefront is the same as every other storefront. All are upscale. All seem to sell the same boutique stuff. All very expensive. And boring. But this does explain why millennials with 6 figure salaries still have no savings. The only original store left is John’s Pizza.
    Walked across 57th st the other day from Carnegie Hall to Mad ave. All boring sheets of glass. One lonely remnant stone mansion surrounded by ongoing construction and protected by a steel net. Snapped a pic with my ever present Minox.
     
  4. Alan Edward Klein

    Alan Edward Klein Member

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    Ah, John's Pizza, my favorite. I use to go to their store on East 63rd St off 1st, but they closed it. NYC is still wonderful. Always action going on no matter where you are. Also, plenty of old buildings too. New York is always in transition. Some foreigner visiting a hundred years ago once asked about all the building construction always going on. "When will you be done?"

    I'd like to see your street shots. Where?
     
  5. Vilk

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    :laugh:
     
  6. Theo Sulphate

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    Yes, we've lost the individuality of cities and towns. In Venice, California, up until the mid-1960's there were grocery stores and cafes which were family owned. I remember two grocery stores, large square brick buildings, which were dark inside and the aisles were a fun maze of passages for a kid to get lost in - so unlike today's brightly lit wide aisles laid out in geometric rows. Those old places had character.

    I wonder if I had the presence of mind to make a photo of those stores; I'll have to search my old negatives.

    Places like that are mostly gone now and it seems as if every city and town is the same.
     
  7. Alan Edward Klein

    Alan Edward Klein Member

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    Lot's of strip malls along the road each looking like the other. But, if you go into small towns, with a main street, there are still lots of quaint shopping and walking areas
     
  8. pentaxuser

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    I wonder if Ted is appreciating all your efforts here?

    pentaxuser
     
  9. guangong

    guangong Member
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    I was strolling across Bleeker st from an opening of my late friend Lou Stettner’s color photography. Of course, I was the oldest friend there. Another old (but younger) mutual friend was there and we were both completely unaware of Lou using color. Masterful street photography with striking composition, including colors, and subject matter.
    Even on those few occasions years ago when I accompanied Louie taking pictures, he could see what I couldn’t see and bring his camera instantly to his eye, snap and done. Composition seemed to be instinctual for Lou, but I know for a fact that he devoted a lot of study to the topic. For me, street fotography ( or perhaps “found scenes photography” without manipulation of subject) is the most difficult of all. From my personal experience, even as a conservative shooter, a lot of film goes through my camera for just a little success. Not for those who believe every roll will yield a “keeper”.
    Lately it has been necessary to walk through the Murray Hill area in Manhattan so as to accompany my wife to Langone Medical, NYU. While many old buildings are no longer private residences, they ave not been bulldozed. Ko.Fe. would enjoy the many unique doorknobs.
     
  10. Saganich

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    I agree, street photography is really low percentage if your not tuned into the flux of composition where both the photographer and the subject are in motion. Like one trapeze artist photographing the other. The best results tend to have all that motion with a slice of culture.
     
  11. guangong

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    It’s low percentage even when you are tuned in! That is the challenge.
     
  12. wyofilm

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    Yeah, it would be nice if OPs would check back in on threads they start, but in the end I've enjoyed this discussion.
     
  13. NB23

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    OPs are over rated, anyways.
     
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    ted_smith

    ted_smith Member
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    I have been checking back, every couple of days, and monitoring the replies, thanks.

    I think as several of you have said, it's what we call in the UK "A Marmite thing" (because people either love Marmite, or they don't like it. Nobody is on the fence with it). I knew several would take my question as a "smear on SP" which I tried my best to make clear it was not at the outset but I see several have jumped on the defence.

    I was simply trying to get my head round it because it would be the most suitable kind of photography for me at the moment. I have no time to do landscapes. My dogs have all died. And I have thousands of photos of my kids. So I need something new that fits with my current lifestyle and SP seemed like a highly convenient possibility. Many of you have responded with helpful remarks and thanks for that. But despite much of the insight and suggested others to lookup, I just don't have an interest for it. I can see a nice photo that others have taken and appreciate it for what it is. But I know that even if I take a SP photo myself that is aesthetically amazing, I won't care for it if its just a stranger. I won't hang it on my wall. And I'll eventually resent shooting film that's between £7-£13 a roll and either paying to have it developed or scanned or spending hours doing it myself. So I think I'll resign myself to it not being a possibility.
     
    Last edited: Nov 4, 2018
  16. faberryman

    faberryman Subscriber

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    I certainly wouldn't spend a lot of time doing something I wasn't interested in just to be doing it. Was that your question?
     
    Last edited: Nov 4, 2018
  17. Pieter12

    Pieter12 Member
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    Your dogs, your kids...you seem to like photos of things that are familiar to you. Maybe try still life with objects that are significant for you.
     
  18. Colin Corneau

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    What is more fascinating than everyday, real life?

    As a photographer, what is more enticing and challenging and just plain FUN than finding the beauty, serendipity and common experience from the chaos of daily life?

    That's my eternal fascination with it. It's a gift that gives endlessly no matter where I visit or for how long. Or whatever camera - film, digital, old, new -- that I use.
     
  19. Alan Edward Klein

    Alan Edward Klein Member

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    Colin You do nice work. Alan.
     
  20. Sirius Glass

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    Find things which you enjoy photographing. What you would like to photograph others may not. It is not about competition or photographing every type of subject; is about find what you enjoy.
     
  21. guangong

    guangong Member
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    OP, why not buy or rescue a puppy or two or three? Aren’t the kids growing and changing, becoming different people? If not currently married, add a babe or two for company. If you go someplace daily for coffee, a beer or a snack where folks know you...take pictures of the place and customers. One of my nicest pictures is a photograph of our butcher surrounded by sparkling white tile and porcelain coated fixtures. Both butcher and shop long gone. Millennials don’t cook, but live on a diet of overpriced coffee and pizza. Hey, that could be an interesting subject for pictures.
     
  22. jtk

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    Fundamental to zen: cpnsider stopping trying. Or just stop.
     
  23. Black Dog

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    I've enjoyed it as a change of scene from landscape! Learning to anticipate what might happen works for me.. Just accept that if it doesn't work, it doesn't work. However even things that don't seem to work at the time are all part of learning to see better.
     
  24. slackercrurster

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    Anyone that does not get SP should go out and do some. Get a taste for it, then you will know. Shove you cam into some strangers face at 1 in the morning and see what it is all about!
     
  25. NB23

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    Someone’s D, or someone’s vomit, good enough?
     

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  26. Colin Corneau

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    Thanks Kindly, Alan.

    I was lucky to have some pretty interesting influences that shaped how I do street photography, and why.
     
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