Trouble making small prints

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noeru

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Hello all,
I'm trying to make very small prints (have quite a lot of old paper I'd like to use) on my Opemus 7 but even with my 80mm lens at f32 the exposure times are uncomfortably short, sometimes even 1sec makes for overexposure. Is a longer lens my only option? I thought maybe I could improvise with an ND filter?
Thanks in advance! :smile:
 

tezzasmall

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As well as stopping down to F32, I presume you are also using multigrade filters, as these extend the exposure a little as well?

Other than that, an ND filter sounds like a good idea to me. :smile:

Terry S
 

Ian C

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Yes, you can install an ND filter on the lens to lengthen the exposure. You might already own a convenient ND filter. For example, a Hoya polarizer holds back about 5/3 stop and will increase exposure by a time factor of 3.17X.

Standard ND filters can give you the following increases:

ND 0.3, 1 stop, 2X

ND 0.6, 2 stops, 4X

ND 0.9, 3 stops 8X

Stronger ND filters are also available.

Measure the thread at the front of the enlarger lens. You can buy a cheap step-up-ring so you can use your camera-lens filters on the enlarger. I do that with my 52mm Nikon filters when needed on an enlarging lens.
 
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MattKing

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A longer lens will make no difference, because the intensity of the light is related to the magnification, which for a given print size (from the same negative) ends up being the same when you change lenses and then adjust the enlarger head to obtain the same size print.
For some enlargers, you are able to substitute another bulb with lower output. That may be an option for you.
I believe that your enlarger has a filter drawer. If so, that is a great place to put an ND filter.
 

Pieter12

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I use an ND filter gel (a lot cheaper than lens filters) in the filter drawer of my Omega D5 all the time. I wouldn't want to stop down to 32--I think that would introduce diffraction and soften your image.
 

Sirius Glass

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A longer lens will make no difference, because the intensity of the light is related to the magnification, which for a given print size (from the same negative) ends up being the same when you change lenses and then adjust the enlarger head to obtain the same size print.
For some enlargers, you are able to substitute another bulb with lower output. That may be an option for you.
I believe that your enlarger has a filter drawer. If so, that is a great place to put an ND filter.

But a longer lens will get the enlarger out of your way.
 

removed account4

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aristo used to sell a rhiostat to be used with their cold light heads.
if ND filters, don't work and you can't change out your bulb for one> less bright
you might consider looking for a rhiostat. when i used the one i bought from aristogrid
it worked flawlessly, no issues with light quality, and i not only used it on my cold light head but
condensor enlargers without a hitch... i changed my processing methods and no longer have
underprocessed/thin negatives so i sold it only after only a couple uses.
it might be something to think about.

good luck !
john
 

glbeas

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And a greater distance between the enlarger head and the baseboard will decrease the amount of light hitting the paper, reducing exposure.

Nope, the amount of light at a particular aperture and image size on the paper will be the same no matter what the focal length. Longer lenses however will more likely have a smaller minimum aperture and often less diffraction at a small aperture because the physical size of the aperture is bigger than it would be at the same f stop on a shorter focal length lens.
 

Vaughn

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And a greater distance between the enlarger head and the baseboard will decrease the amount of light hitting the paper, reducing exposure.
Another way to look at it...At the same shutter speed and scene brightness, f16 from any focal length lens will throw the same amount of light onto the film -- even with the lens and film being farther apart with a 600mm lens compared to a 150mm lens.
 

voceumana

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You don't specify the type of paper you are using nor the light source. If it is graded paper and a tungsten lamp then using a dimming control would be a good way to increase the exposure time. A "variac" is a good choice to do that, but rather expensive. Standard household dimmers can also work, but you'll need to wire it up in an electrical box with appropriate input cord and output outlet.

If the paper is graded, then lamp color shift caused by a dimmer might be a problem. If the lamp is a cold light then the Aristo dimmer mentioned is the best option.
 

MattKing

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And a greater distance between the enlarger head and the baseboard will decrease the amount of light hitting the paper, reducing exposure.
It doesn't, because the longer lens that permits the greater distance concentrates the light to a smaller area.
The two effects cancel each other out.
Longer lenses sometimes have a smaller minimum aperture. If it weren't for the problems with diffraction, that would help.
 

voceumana

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If you are willing to acquire new paper, contact printing papers are much slower than enlarging papers. Lodima paper and Adox Lupex are current contact printing papers. Both are relatively expensive.
 

Huub

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As already mentioned by others: an ND filter will do the job. You will probably need a 3 or 5 stop one to get the times you need, assuming you use a condensor enlarger.

When you already have one for your camera: a step up ring in the right size will make it possible to attach the filter to the front of your lens. You could also let gravity do it's work and lay it on the back of the lens. Otherwise: get some ND gells and put it in the filter drawer. There are some older posts on this forum that will show a link where you can get them cheaply.

When you use a colour head: dial in the same amount of the three colours until you have the times you need with at normal working aperture.
 
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