Sunny 16/exposure in a foggy day

Discussion in 'Exposure Discussion' started by Thrain, Jul 25, 2018.

  1. Thrain

    Thrain Member

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    Hello analog enthusiastics!
    Since i live in a very foggy area, and because i have and want to take pictures with my leica m4 without a lying exposemeter, i'd like to know any tip to take pictures in a foggy day, like the typical one in San Francisco where you can't see beyond 20-30 meters. Thus involving the sunny 16 rule. So, for example, if i have 400 iso film, and wanting to shoot at 1/500s, what aperture should i set?
    The problem is that even if it may seem that the aperture you need is the same as the one needed in a heavy overcast day, the foreground is grey, which means is lighter than the aformentioned day.
    Any tip to get the right exposure during fog without a meter?
    Thanks in advance :D
     
  2. Rick A

    Rick A Subscriber

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    There really is no "one trick" when photographing fog, too many variables. It depends on time of day, sky conditions (overcast or clear), orientation of light source, etc. Buy a good quality incidence meter and learn to use it. I rely on my Sekonic L-398 for those shots.
    [​IMG]
     
  3. Kino

    Kino Subscriber

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    Assuming b&w negative film, I'd try f5.6 and use a "soft developer" like Xtol and bracket. Be prepared to fail and learn.

    As Rick says, there are too many variables to just give a standard response to your question.

    What film are you using?
     
  4. guangong

    guangong Subscriber

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    Depends on what you want. More fog? Blue filter. Less fog? Yellow filter. As is? No liter. I wear yellow tinted shooting glasses when driving in fifth to improve vision.
    Use an incident meter, bracket shots and decide what you like best.
    Congratulations on M4, the best Leica ever made in terms of build quality and handling.
     
  5. Kino

    Kino Subscriber

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    Also, if you don't have anything in the frame (as in Rick's shot above) to give you a solid dmax or shadow, your eye will not have a reference point from which to comprehend the fog and it will just look washed-out and low contrast.
     
  6. rpavich

    rpavich Subscriber

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    The problem with fog is that it changes unlike the sunny 16 being based on a constant light source (the sun not burning out unexpectedly :smile: )

    You can take guesses (stop down 3 stops from sunny 16) but that's not the way to go about it.

    I agree with the other commenters; buy an incident meter and use it. Try a used Sekonic 308S. There are also a lot of earlier analogue ones from different manufacturers that are very cool and affordable.

    Like this:
    https://www.ebay.com/itm/Gossen-Sixtar-Light-Meter-Classic-analog-meter-at-a-good-price/122500218242?hash=item1c8594fd82:g:T8kAAOSwcgNZG5hr&_sacat=0&_nkw=analogue+light+meter&_from=R40&rt=nc&_trksid=m570.l1313


    Not only will you expose well, you'll be the envy of your camera-toting friends!
     
  7. rpavich

    rpavich Subscriber

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  8. OP
    OP
    Thrain

    Thrain Member

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    Thank you very much guys!

    Usually I use Tri-x 400 and hc110 as a developer.

    I love it (and is cheaper than the m6, which has a meter)

    Thanks for the advice on something i might strongly consider buying

    Yesss alreasy saw that :D but i have an even better one w/ few more cases! (i'd send you a link but is in italian) But since there's no clue for fog, i thought i might need to know that, assuming that i will face it in the near future

    Thanks for all the nice answers! :D
    I am thinking of a foggy day in bright autumn in the early morning (something like during October/november),
    Sooo opening 3 stops? In any case, I will bracket of course :tongue:
     
  9. rpavich

    rpavich Subscriber

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    They also make phone apps that measure exposure. They seem to work ok from what I can tell.
     
  10. tedr1

    tedr1 Member

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    In between making pictures in the fog you might perhaps consider study of the subject of exposure meters, their design, function, and use. The internet is a very good source of this kind of technical information.
     
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