Shot and Push-Processed Ilford HP5 at 12800 - results

Discussion in 'Exposure Discussion' started by peanutbutter&jelly, May 30, 2018.

  1. peanutbutter&jelly

    peanutbutter&jelly Member

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    Hey all,

    I'm new to this forum, and my experience push-processing a roll of HP5 to what I think was 12,800 got me curious as to if I really did develop the image at 12,800 or if there's something else to it. I'm still a beginner to the whole dev process.

    As background: when I shot the roll, I used a light meter and set it to 6400 ISO (since that was the highest it went), and then I moved shutter speed or aperture one stop over to compensate for 12800, and from there I took pictures accordingly. When I got home, the only developer I had was D-76, and so I guesstimated dev times based on an exponential chart I drew out.

    What I came to was that at 68F, dev time for 12800 on a roll of HP5 was about 27:30 with initial 30 seconds then 10 second agitation every minute. So I did that, and my pictures came out surprisingly well. Everything below had very little to no touching up on Photoshop's Levels. Was this just beginner's luck? Not using this as self promo but more to understand if saying what ISO you shot at is purely arbitrary or not. Check it out:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  2. summicron1

    summicron1 Subscriber

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    i strongly suspect -- just guessing here -- that your actual film speed was not that high, but you sure got something and that's all that matters. There are limits, mostly as the developer get's used up, but HP5 is also very forgiving.

    Do it again, see if it is reproducable. You never know.
     
  3. pentaxuser

    pentaxuser Subscriber

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    They look pretty good. Another poster seems to have questioned whether your speed was in fact 12,800. I can only surmise that this may be due to your use of the word "over" . For clarity do you mean that after getting the right exposure for 6400 you went to a higher shutter speed ie. if the shutter speed for 6400 was 1/30th then you moved to 1/60th( underexpose) as opposed to 1/15th(overexpose) compared to what the meter said?

    Thanks

    pentaxuser
     
  4. OP
    OP
    peanutbutter&jelly

    peanutbutter&jelly Member

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    Thanks for asking to clarify. I meant the former. So if the shutter speed for 6400 was 1/30th, I moved it to 1/60th. Which leads me to believe that this is indeed 12,800.
     
  5. Eric Rose

    Eric Rose Subscriber

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    Give it a try with a Rodinal equivalent developer with semi stand development. What you got looks pretty impressive so far.
     
  6. pentaxuser

    pentaxuser Subscriber

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    Thanks and I'd agree. Maybe this has clarified it for the poster in question as well. The meter may of course be wrong but otherwise in the absence of any evidence I cannot work out how the poster can suspect strongly that your speed was lower. He may now tell us what he believes the evidence to be for this belief

    pentaxuser
     
  7. OP
    OP
    peanutbutter&jelly

    peanutbutter&jelly Member

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    Just looked into Rodinal (I've been using D-76 for the last couple of months) and it looks awesome! Will give it a try for some variety!
     
  8. MattKing

    MattKing Subscriber

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    It is important to understand that push processing doesn't really increase the light sensitivity of the film (much).
    What it does do is increase the contrast of that part of the scene where there was enough light to cause at least some image to be formed.
    A push development attempting to achieve an Exposure Index of 12,800 is a five stop push.
    Your results are fairly useful because there are enough highlights in your subjects which can survive five stops of under-exposure, once the resulting murky low contrast is boosted back to near normal with the increased development.
    The shadows and low mid-tones in the scene can't survive that much under-exposure - that is normal.
     
  9. Lachlan Young

    Lachlan Young Member

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    Real world, you were probably closer to an EI of 1600 than 12800 - those subjects might well fall closer to an EV of 4-5 in actuality.
     
  10. pentaxuser

    pentaxuser Subscriber

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    Lachlan, I am unsure what you mean in terms of how this affects what the OP did with his meter when he set it to 6,400 and then halved the meter's exposure so it was as if he had set his meter to 12,800. Your quote seems to explain why the other poster said the real speed was lower. Can you expand on the above

    Thanks

    pentaxuser
     
  11. faberryman

    faberryman Subscriber

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    It doesn't look like pushing HP5+ to 12,800 is that great an idea. I can't remember ever encountering a low light setting that would require it, especially for those indoor music venue images. That's five stops from ISO 400. For indoor, 1/30th at f/2 is a common exposure. Your light reading was 1 sec at f/2 or something? Or was this just an experiment?
     
    Last edited: May 31, 2018
  12. Lachlan Young

    Lachlan Young Member

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    Take a look here:
    http://www.fredparker.com/ultexp1.htm#Light Intensity Chart

    Working from known EV's is often a pretty accurate way to estimate light - and then compare what the table states with the lighting in the images. As an aside, the whole reason why Kubrick used those T0.7 lenses for Barry Lyndon was because he was trying to get an EV of 4 (candle light) to work on Kodak 5254 (100T, could be pushed a stop at maximum) - and none of the images above are under anything darker than what the EV table defines as representing an EV of 4 - at least for reproduction of the scene as your eye would 'perceive' it - & in those specific lighting situations, the shadows are normally quite dark.
     
  13. OP
    OP
    peanutbutter&jelly

    peanutbutter&jelly Member

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    I also did some outdoor shots that were most definitely not 1,600. I shot them just as I did before, by setting light meter to 6,400 and making shutter speed one stop faster to compensate. See here:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  14. pentaxuser

    pentaxuser Subscriber

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    Thanks Lachlan. It would appear that from the EV tables in Lachan's link, the pictures taken by the OP were around say EV 4-5. However to work out what the means in terms of correct aperture and speed we need to know what his shutter speed and aperture was. So at EV4 the tables gives a range of speeds for various apertures which result in correct exposure for an ISO of 100. Once we know the shutter speed and aperture we can then work forward in stops, 100,200 400 etc and arrive at what film speed his shutter speed and aperture corresponds to in order to see how close it was to ISO1600.

    I may be wrong but throughout the thread I think we have only spoken of theoretical examples of speeds and nowhere is there actual speeds and apertures

    So, OP can you give us your shutter speeds and apertures for the shots you took.

    Thanks

    pentaxuser
     
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