Rollei 400 IR with Hoya 72 vs Fuji XT1

Discussion in 'Exposure Discussion' started by young_ghiaccio, Jun 10, 2018.

  1. young_ghiaccio

    young_ghiaccio Member

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    Hi all

    Been doing a lot of research here but didn't see this before.

    I plan on shooting IR with my Mamiya 7 but don't want to mess it up, I decided to do some test metering and exposures using a digital camera and get vastly different results.

    From what I've read on this forum, I want to meter at ISO 12 and use that reading for creating my film photograph. When I use my external meter and get a reading, I apply those settings to my digital camera with the filter attached and get a black exposure.

    Reading at ISO 12:
    T 1/30, F f/8

    Using the digital cam with h72 i get all black but
    If I try 25 seconds at f/8 I get a great image

    Im not sure how to proceed with the film now, any ideas?
     
  2. mpirie

    mpirie Member

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    I think it's unrealistic to assume that your digital camera sensor will have the same IR response as film.

    Set your meter to ISO 12 (personally, i use EI 6), stick the R72 on the lens, load some film and go have some fun.

    You will mess-up.....it's the nature of IR photography.....just make sure you learn from it and pay attention to the subject lighting, sun direction etc.

    Mike
     
  3. mooseontheloose

    mooseontheloose Subscriber

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    Don't make it too difficult for yourself! Load your film, use your external meter (set for 12 iso) and bracket. If it's your first roll, use that as a test. Find a scene you like, shoot your first frame without a filter, and then the next 4 with the filter on - metered at 12, plus one stop under, one stop over,and two stops over. Then find another scene, with the same or different lighting conditions, and do the same again. Develop with your regular developer, evaluate the negs, find the ones you like the best (not everyone goes for the same infrared look - you may prefer it more intense, or less so) and use that for your base exposure the next time you go out. If you find that you like the ones that are a stop overexposed, then shoot the entire roll at iso 6 next time. Although we can't meter infrared exactly, I have never had a problem just trusting the meter with whatever film I'm using and my preferred film speed for it (Kodak HIE, Rollei IR, Efke IR, Konica IR, Ilford SFX, etc. - I've shot them all).
     
  4. Sirius Glass

    Sirius Glass Subscriber

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    Shoot brightly lit foliage with the sun directly on it and behind you. You will be wasting your time shooting either towards the sun for backlit scenes or from the side.
     
  5. mooseontheloose

    mooseontheloose Subscriber

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    +1 Although I would say you don't always have to shoot in brightly lit conditions. Some of my best photos are from when it was slightly overcast - I've even seen successful shots from foggy days. I've even shot infrared at night to prove that it could be done (the sun is not the only source of infrared light). The only way to know is to shoot in different kinds of light, and with different kinds of subjects (trees with white leaves bore me, but give me calm water or aged wood in infrared and I am a very happy girl!) Again, it all depends on what you are looking for in your photographs.
     
  6. Pieter12

    Pieter12 Member

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    As far as the original post goes, I don't think you can set your Fuji digital camera to ISO 12, so that would be why you cannot get the right exposure from your meter reading with the meter set at ISO 12.
     
  7. Paul Manuell

    Paul Manuell Member

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    Can I just clarify something here for myself, because I'm going to be doing some shoots this summer with SFX200 and an IR720 filter: when people talk about setting the ISO to 12, presumably that's to get metered readings at that ISO speed WITHOUT the filter on, so that when the filter is then attached its light stopping factor is already taken into account, ie., 400 ISO film overexposed by, in the case of the OP, 5 stops to account for the filter's light cutting effect by that amount. Is that right or have I totally misunderstood it?
     
  8. MattKing

    MattKing Subscriber

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    Correct.
    Except for many of us, we are using a separate hand meter to measure that light.
    The most important thing to understand though is that your meter isn't capable of metering the IR and near IR light that you are trying to record,. For IR work, you are measuring the visible light, and applying your judgment and experience with respect to how and under what circumstances the levels of visible light and IR light correlate.
    Educated guessing is always important with IR.
     
  9. Sirius Glass

    Sirius Glass Subscriber

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    Digital cameras have built in IR filters so unless you dismantle the camera and remove the built in filter you will not get IR on a digital camera. On the other hand a digital camera without an IR filter can get some outstanding images.
     
  10. Paul Manuell

    Paul Manuell Member

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    Thank you.
     
  11. Paul Manuell

    Paul Manuell Member

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    Ok, probably a bit late, but having recently used and had developed my first ever roll of SFX200 (I know, not a true infrared film, but hopefully the same working principal as the Rollei) and being chuffed to bits with the results, here's how I worked with it.

    Having read a very useful post on another thread (titled Rollei IR400S - it's not HIE, but WOW) about Rollei IR400, where the poster helpfully provided photo examples, I basically framed and focussed my shot on a tripod without the IR720 filter attached, set my aperture to f11 (to get decent sharpness without having to worry about focussing specifically for infrared), noted the shutter speed given then simply added 4 stops of overexposure once the filter was attached. For virtually every shot I was getting a non filtered reading of 1/250th at f11 without the filter - it was a very sunny few days -, so set the shutter speed to 1/15th. I took most of my shots at this setting, but for a couple where I really wanted them to be 'keepers' I also exposed them at 5 and 6 stops over, so 1/8th and 1/4 respectively. The 4 stops over gave the best results in those particular photos too. The iso was set at box speed by the way, so iso 200 in my case.

    As the view through the viewfinder was non existent with the filter attached - so, basically black - I had no confidence that anything at all would come out, but was blown away when I actually got the photos back. They were never going to be as good as true infrared, but what I did get put a huge smile on my face.
     
    Last edited: Jul 8, 2018
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