Reticulation

Discussion in 'Color: Film, Paper, and Chemistry' started by tiberiustibz, Feb 1, 2009.

  1. tiberiustibz

    tiberiustibz Member

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    So I have heard about reticulation and I understand that it is some sort of fragmenting of the gelatin of the film that comes with great temperature changes between chemical baths/washes. I know that B+W film is effected by this but I was wondering whether the same can occur for color film. The kodak publication states that all chemicals except the developer will work down to 75 degrees. This seems to imply that one does not have to worry about vast temperature changes with color film processing. Any help here?

    I typically will use the bleach and fix at close to room temperature and have not had any problems.
     
  2. Photo Engineer

    Photo Engineer Subscriber

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    Reticulation can take place with color films, but as they are designed for higher temperatures, it is much less likely to take place.

    PE
     
  3. Ed Sukach

    Ed Sukach Member

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    Careful ... I've found that Kodak seems to be overly fussy - in spades - when they "require" the color chemistry to be used at a given temperature " +/- 1/4 degree F".
    I've, ahem! ... processed film at "print" temperature; 35 deg.C; and prints at "film" temperature; 38 deg. C - 3 degrees Celsius off either way, without a great deal of adverse effects. I'll see more variation from lot-to-lot chemistry.

    However - UNIFORMITY between steps is another matter. I've found that reticulation (appearance of emulsion resembling crocodile skin) DOES occur due to thermal shock - great differences in temperature between solutions - especially with black and white film. I can't specifically remember that happening with color film, but I won't chance it in the future, either.
     
  4. Thomas Bertilsson

    Thomas Bertilsson Member

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    I once met a photographer whom I still admire a lot. She knew precisely what she wanted, and wanted it only for herself. Didn't care if she ever became famous or not. Remarkable talent.

    Recipe:
    Everything shot with a Minox 35GT camera on Ilford XP-2 Super. She stated that she 'reticulated' everything, because she liked the look.
    Printed everything on Ilford Galerie. 6x8" prints (or so) on 11x14" paper, so lots of white border around.

    Her prints were some of the most exciting and beautiful I've ever seen. Bar none. I can't find her anymore, but she used to come here to APUG and that's how we made contact in the first place.

    Questions then: Since this is in the color film/chemistry section, Ilford XP-2 Super applies, sort of. Is this film particularly sensitive to reticulation? And I'd like to see what a reticulated color film looks like too. I suppose the blix could be cooled off to 85*F or so, but I would presume that cooling off the wash water would be even more effective. Can you reticulate a film after it's been developed, by first soaking in hot water and then quickly dunking it in cold water?

    - Thomas
     
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    tiberiustibz

    tiberiustibz Member

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    It's any temperature shock so I'd assume it could occur post development. Any idea how great it has to be? And would it be obvious or appear like coarser grain?