Pyrocat/PMK

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Bruce Osgood

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I've been using PMK with 4X5 BPF 200 and while I like the PMK I've found problems with the BPF. Enough of a problem that I would like to try other films with the PMK I have and soon try Pyrocat HD. My problem with BPF is inconsistent pin holes in the emulsion that I don't want to deal with. It would be easier to change films than developers.

So my question is, are there some films "more" receptive to stain developers than others?
 

Peter Schrager

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TMAX

Bruce- try TMAX400. This is probably the best staining combo in my opinion with pyrocat-hd. Although I still have the older version. Tri-=x stains very well too.
Regards, Peter
 

Greg Rust

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Bruce,

I can recommend FP4+ with both PMK and Pyrocat. It is much sharper than BPF and has a beautiful tonality.

Greg
 

Peter Schrager

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PRO160?

Bruce-I never heard of TMX-pro360. Is this a 4x5 film? I was referring to the TMAX400. Try it and you won't believe the difference. I never cared for BPF200. And it doesn't do N+1 so why bother. The tmax400 works very well for alternate process. I've also used it with W2D2. That doesn't get much play here but is a very good economical developer if you make it yourself. Feel free to PM me if you have any questions.
Good luck, Peter
 
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Bruce Osgood

Bruce Osgood

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Bruce (Camclicker) said:
Peter;
Are you suggesting the TMax Pro 360? I think they also make a reformulated TMax 400(?).

No, I dont think you are. I looked at the Kodak site and you are probably suggesting Kodak T-Max 400 TMY Professional 4053 Black & White Film ISO 400.

Thanks, I've been looking for a good reason to try T Grain film again.
 

Peter Schrager

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FP-4

I definately agree that FP-4 and Pyrocat is worth trying if you want a slower film Bruce. Those two seem to be made for each other.
Peter
 

Chris Fraser

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I also use FP4 with PMK and like the combination. Buy I did have some problems with pinholes so now I only use water for a stop bath. Haven't had a pinholes problem since
 

Tom Stanworth

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many swear by efke pl100, but is also notorious for pinholes and emulsion softness. I loved FP4 in Exactol Lux and as I am starting to use Pyrocat, expect more of the same.
 

Peter Schrager

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PL100

I been trying out the Pl100 in 4x5 and it seems to be OK as far as emulsion softness and pinholes. Maybe they have addressed the problems.
Regards, Peter
 

Tom Hoskinson

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I shoot a lot of Efke 100 in sizes from 120 roll through 8x10 sheet. I develop most of it in Pyrocat-HD with no stop bath (plain water instead) and an alkaline non-hardening fixer.

Absolutely no pinholes! No problems with emulsion softness (that I didn't create)!
 

noseoil

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The pinhole thing has a lot to do with acid stops, but this can happen with any film. A water stop is fine if you allow for it in your process. Granted, the emulsion is soft, but technique can be the sole variable to avoid problems in this area. Try tube development and you won't get scratches or any development problems.

I don't know of a finer film than Efke 25 for building contrast and a crisp tonal scale, which can be tailored to any process you like to use. Once development times are tamed, you'll be amazed at the image quality possible with this film. As long as you're not in a hurry for quick shutter speeds, there is a lot going for this choice of film.

Efke 100 is still the winner for pushing, pulling, expanding, compressing and general torture of a film to fit nearly any situation out there. I'm surprised PETF (People for the ethical treatment of films) hasn't set up a picket line around the factory to protest what some people have done with this stuff.
tim
 
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