Powder vs. Liquid?

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VoidoidRamone

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This may be a very basic question but I wasn't sure. Is there any difference, aside from ease of use and price, between a powder developer and a liquid developer? For instance I noticed that I can get PMK Pyro in either liquid or powder, liquid is $2 more. I prefer liquid so I don't have to inhale the powders while mixing. But are there any advantages to either? Thank you. -Grant
 

sanking

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VoidoidRamone said:
This may be a very basic question but I wasn't sure. Is there any difference, aside from ease of use and price, between a powder developer and a liquid developer? For instance I noticed that I can get PMK Pyro in either liquid or powder, liquid is $2 more. I prefer liquid so I don't have to inhale the powders while mixing. But are there any advantages to either? Thank you. -Grant

The only issue is shipping costs, which should be less expensive for a powder kit, and whether or not you want to mix the solutons yourself. One way or the other the powder eventually has to get into liquid form..


Sandy
 

Bruce Osgood

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VoidoidRamone said:
......Is there any difference, aside from ease of use and price, between a powder developer and a liquid developer? For instance I noticed that I can get PMK Pyro in either liquid or powder, liquid is $2 more. I prefer liquid so I don't have to inhale the powders while mixing. But are there any advantages to either? Thank you. -Grant

There is no difference between liquid and powder if used identically (not necessarily correctly, just identically). An additional convenience to liquid concentrates is that you can make up as much as you want: one shot or ten shot, one liter or 10 liter, it's up to you. With powders you should use the entire envelop to make a stock solution which may go bad by the time you finish it.

Generally powders are packaged with additional chemical preservatives to maintain their shelf life.

So yes, there are material differences between a liquid concentrate and a packaged powder, but the difference should not alter the final product.
 

gainer

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There is little chance that the stock solutions of PMK will go bad in any less than 10 years. This life will be the same whether you buy the liquid or mix it yourself from the powder kit. It and Rodinal have perhaps the longest shelf lives of all the water-mixed stock solutions. Neither kit comes from Photographers Formulary in a single package of powder.
 

ThomHarrop

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The biggest difference to me is that mixing powders is the most hazzardous thing you can do in the darkroom. When you mix developer the powders become airborne and enter your lungs. If you use premixed developer you avoid this.
 

jstraw

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Has anyone here gone 100% powder-free, using only liquids for developers, stop, fix, washing agents and toners?
 

jim appleyard

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HC-110, in its concentrated form, also lasts a very long time.

I usually mix my own devs from dry chems using the teaspoon method, but wear gloves and a mask to make sure. doing it. On the occasion that I mix up a pre-packaged powder (D-76, Dektol) I go outside. The main thing is that I am careful doing it either way. Liquid chemistry may be safer, but not without risks.
 

Gerald Koch

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mixing powders is the most hazzardous thing you can do in the darkroom.
Fully agree. You really shouldn't mix any chemicals in the darkroom. Chemicals can become airborne and eventually find their way onto films or papers.
 

Fotohuis

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Has anyone here gone 100% powder-free, using only liquids for developers, stop, fix, washing agents and toners?

Yes, I do. Already for over 15 years. It's also working much quicker and more convenient. Further indeed dust and chemical partikels is not good if in contact with photographic materials like films and photopaper.

75% of all stuff I am working with is from Amaloco photo chemicals. They're only selling liquid chemicals. Further my pallet is 'free of charge' and the rest is for our customers.:wink:

Best regards,

Robert
 

sbelyaev

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Try different developers and use ones that you like the most regardless whether they are liquid or dry. It is almost impossible to find a liquid replacement for Perceptol or dry Rodinal. But if for whatever reason you like them you will use them.
 
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