Plastic SLRs

Discussion in '35mm Cameras and Accessories' started by blockend, May 26, 2016.

  1. Sewin

    Sewin Member

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    Not delivered yet, I thought the F90 was the main culprit for stickiness and the F65 for deilcate backs.
     
  2. Sirius Glass

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    NIkon F100 was the best plastic camera Nikon made. Feature-wise Nikon F100 was the best camera Nikon made.
     
  3. Sewin

    Sewin Member

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    I Agree, and the F80, but we are in the bargain basement department here:smile:
     
  4. sabredog

    sabredog Member

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    I have been using one of my Canon EOS 500n plastic SLR's of late and have really been enjoying the experience. Light, easy to use and fun.
     
  5. Cholentpot

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    Just loaded up my 500n with Tri-x. It's a nifty little camera that makes shooting light and airy. Only issue with my G is the flash has to be taped down. For some reason it always pops up.
     
  6. sabredog

    sabredog Member

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    I am starting to recommend to friends who want to shoot a few rolls of film as a break to using their DSLR's to go back to a late model 35mm plastic SLR of the same brand. Lens are the same mount type and often the controls are so similar that there is a zero learning curve. Seems to be a successful suggestion :smile:
     
  7. OP
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    blockend

    blockend Member
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    Is that because you're set on full program mode? Quite a few SLRs are prone to want fill in flash in total automatic settings. Moving them to another part of the PASM dial often fixes things, especially (M)anual.
     
  8. And I thought the N80/F80 was the worst for stickiness. I've owned a few and they were all pretty awful until I treated them with a very light dusting of talcum powder.
     
  9. The F80 -- or N80 on this side of the pond -- may be a bargain basement selection now. Which I don't entirely understand, btw. But it sold for a respectable sum when new -- about $330 street price. Not a lot when one prices it against a DSLR, but that was in the median range for new 35mm SLRs back when it was sold new.

    I think a lot of folks lump the N80 in with earlier camera models with rather lame and sluggish features -- but that isn't at all the case with this camera. It's actually a good performer. Light, quiet, fast AF, lots of controls, and just a lot of fun to use. Of course, as a buyer, it's nice being able to pick up a clean, lightly used copy for $40, so it's hard to complain.
     
  10. Sewin

    Sewin Member

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    I also liked the F801, but that's not a lightweight plastic SLR.:smile:
     
  11. OP
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    blockend

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    True, it was definitely mid-range and heavy as I recall. Nikon weren't the only manufacturer to opt for soft touch surfaces in the 1990s (a kind of rubberized plastic), but they do seem to have weathered worst than most. The very worst were Sigma lenses of the period, the coverings on mine have literally melted to a liquid goo.

    Current prices don't reflect the original status of a camera, and there's been price compression of second hand SLRs since digital. Even the basic, entry level plastic SLRs that concern this thread weren't especially cheap new. Now some are less than the price of a disposable camera, which is crazy for a fully equipped film camera.
     
  12. klownshed

    klownshed Member

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    I have a couple of F801s and an F90x and have been lucky with the rubber. It is fine on all of them.

    On mine the weak link is the battery holder assembly. I have 2 F801s as the battery holder on one of them totally disintegrated and i bought another with battery grip to fix it (grip was cheaper to buy with another body than on its own!). The battery grip replaces the battery holder but makes a big camera huge and heavy...

    The F90 in particular is a lot of camera for the £20 or so I paid for it. And also uses the same grip as the 801 which is handy.

    I originally bought an F801 as I had a Nikon DSLR and wanted a cheap film body that I could use my lenses on. The DSLR has since gone.

    If I was buying today I'd go straight to the F90 and give the 801s a miss. I can't even sell the 801s as neither has a battery holder and I'll keep The grip for my 90.
     
  13. sabredog

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    I picked up a Canon EOS 1000n primarily for the two lens, a Sigma (cannot remember what it was) and a Canon 35-70. The Sigma lens had effectively welded itself together where the rubber was and nothing would move. So after some deliberation and some attempt to resurrect it, threw it out. The Canon lens is in excellent condition.
     
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    blockend

    blockend Member
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    I would never buy another Sigma lens based on their responses. I had three, and all the coatings turned to liquid. Sigma claimed the lenses may have been kept near chemicals (those chemicals including human contact presumably) when the issue of coating longevity is widely known. None of my other lenses kept in the same place have deteriorated. I wouldn't put another penny into that company.
     
  16. Cholentpot

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    Nah, it's got a busted plastic clip thingy. I generally shoot my film in M mode 'cause it saves me money.
     
  17. Bobkins

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    I was skeptical about plastic SLR
    but bought a
    Konica Minolta HTsi Plus
    and I like it

    - it is cheap
    - small, light
    - speed max is 1/4000 s
    - ability to set ISO manually

    33582053840_a08f0869f3_k.jpg



    33620945320_eaecc92744_k.jpg
     
  18. Glen Diamond

    Glen Diamond Member

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    I too, purchased a Nikon F75/N75 as it has compatibility with G-Lenses that have Vibration Reduction... however, the weird battery isn't regularly available everywhere, costs quite a bit, and only managed to last through one roll of film. I guess the VR kills that little battery!!!!
     
  19. OP
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    blockend

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    That interesting Glen, I didn't know the F75 had VR. CR123 batteries can be had for £1.85, maybe cheaper via China, so not very expensive. Many SLRs and compacts of the era took CR123 batteries and I find they last ages, so it must the vibration reduction that's sucking the juice, or you have a fault in your F75.
     
  20. Sirius Glass

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    I just find that the CR123 batteries always go when I am on a trip and I cannot locate the spares that I have. Then no one has them in stock. Grrr ... but I can find them at home with little trouble.
     
  21. Ap507b

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    Decided I didn't like CR123's in the way they went from showing fully charged on the camera to flat in the space of a couple of shots. Got an MB-16 for my F80 & run it off AA's instead. Unexpected bonus was that the extra height it gave the camera makes it sit better in my hand. Maybe think about the MB-18 for the F75? The backs on both my F65 & F80 have gone sticky with age. F80 is a very good camera despite it though.
     
  22. George Mann

    George Mann Member

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    My F90x is built better than the F100's that I have seen.
     
  23. I have an N80 and this is exactly what I've done. The MB-16 isn't all that common, but a bit of perseverance usually results in rewards. I have largish hands and I find the extension the battery pack provides to aid a lot in just general comfort. And of course being able to use "AA" batteries instead of the sometimes hard-to-find CR123s is a relief. I recall when I bought my first N80, I went to a local Walgreens drug store looking for batteries. I found one there and they wanted $12.95 for it! Yikes! So I went on the Internet and found a place where I could buy a 4-pack for about five bucks. That was a relief, so I ordered a 4-pack, but I immediately searched for info on a battery pack and found out about the MB-16. Within a couple of weeks, I had one installed on my N80 and I haven't looked back since.

    I've bought and sold several minty N80s, and one thing they all had in common was a very sticky exterior when I first acquired them. What I did to get rid of it was to use just a bit of talcum powder -- it doesn't take much, even if the entire body is sticky. The easiest way to apply it is to rub it into my hands and then just, well, handle the camera thoroughly. Seems to be a permanent cure too. The N80 I kept, I've had for over a year and no stickiness has returned. I also suspect that just handling the camera helps too.
     
  24. Ronix18

    Ronix18 Member

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    Nikon N75/F75 vs Minolta Dynax 5/Maxxum5

    Hello, everyone.

    I come to you hoping that you all can help me decide, and maybe tell me your opinions and experiences with any of these two cameras. I've seen that you have mentioned the Nikon F75 quite a lot in this topic.

    I’ve been shooting film for about 5 years now. I always shoot an Olympus OM-2n with a Zuiko 50mm 1.8, Olympus 35 RC and an Olympus mju ii (Stylus Epic). I do most of all color photography, not black and white. I shoot landscapes, architecture, urban life and sometimes portraits, I do not shoot street photography almost never. I am not a professional photographer, I just happen to love photography and I take it seriously, even though I do not need a super pro gear to be happy.

    Even though I’m very happy with my cameras, I wanted to try an AF SLR which is small and light, because I don’t like heavy bulky cameras. I have small hands and I always carry a camera with me in my backpack (I always carry with me one of the above mentioned).

    After doing some research, I decided I might take one of this two cameras: A Nikon N75 (or F75) or a Minolta Dynax 5 (Or Maxxum 5). I found both in mint condition (bodys only) for 30€ here where I live in France (shipment cost included).

    Ergonomics, size and weight are the dealbreaker for me (otherwise I’d take an F100), and of course lenses (I want to buy an AF 50mm f/1.8 d if I choose the Nikon or an AF 50mm f/1.7 if I choose the Minolta, because I prefer shooting in 50mm than a lens-kit).

    I have read that overall the Minolta is a better camera, and I wanted to know if the lens just mentioned is also better than the Nikon one.

    What about metering, exposure and AF speed in these two cameras? Apparently, the Dynax is better metering light (and it’s easier to use the spot metering) and it focus faster, but I’m concerned that the lens is not as sharp as the Nikon one. Also, I prefer the black look of the Nikon, even though the Minolta kind of reminds me of my OM-2n.


    I really cannot decide yet, that’s why I would be so grateful if you could help me and give me some advices.


    Thank you in advance, guys!
     
  25. Mainecoonmaniac

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    Plastic isn't necessarily bad. It's cheaper to mold plastic than to mill metal. It also makes a lighter weight product. There are also some excellent lens barrels that are plastic. Though plastic can give excellent performance, it's gives the product a "cheap" feel. I remember when I bought my first Canon DSLR, I was shocked that the camera and the lens barrels are plastic. It's an old fart being used to shoot with metal cameras and lenses.
     
  26. sabredog

    sabredog Member

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    I got all keen pre-Christmas and put on winning eBay bids on a very good condition Minolta 7000i SLR body, two setting cards and a third party book for it. A lens for it was sourced at a local pawn shop which was heavily discounted and in excellent condition. Grand total for everything was about A$22.

    Seals look ok and the camera all seems to function well so time to put a roll through it as see how it performs. The AF is remarkably snappy.

    26165521_1764930166862247_4956034990557934578_n.jpg
    26047449_1764930136862250_4637450032912839810_n.jpg
     
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