Photography is "over"

Discussion in 'Ethics and Philosophy' started by gr82bart, Oct 12, 2017.

  1. gr82bart

    gr82bart Member

    Messages:
    5,592
    Joined:
    Mar 1, 2003
    Location:
    Los Angeles and Toronto
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
  2. MartinCrabtree

    MartinCrabtree Member

    Messages:
    1,882
    Joined:
    Feb 10, 2010
    Location:
    Knobbley Mountain
    Shooter:
    35mm
    [​IMG]
     
  3. Paul Manuell

    Paul Manuell Member
    Ads Enabled

    Messages:
    191
    Joined:
    Jul 3, 2017
    Location:
    United Kingdom
    Shooter:
    Medium Format
    Well I load film into the camera and take photos, and will continue to do so for as long as film is still available, so for me, no, photography's definitely not over.
     
  4. Ces1um

    Ces1um Member
    Ads Enabled

    Messages:
    1,071
    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2015
    Location:
    Nova Scotia, Canada
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    I think websites like photrio prove that it isn't dead. Youtube series like the art of photography back that up as well. I think people still take deliberate photographs of themselves and family and I'd qualify that as photography. Those pictures taken to make sure you're getting the correct type of cereal or a reminder photo of a list of groceries to pick up- that wouldn't qualify as photography to me. I think those type of photos are on the rise, but to say photography is over is simply click bait on the Guardian's part.
     
  5. bdial

    bdial Subscriber
    Ads Enabled

    Messages:
    6,272
    Joined:
    Jan 2, 2005
    Location:
    North East U.S.
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    I'd say that it isn't over.
    IMO, photography has never been only about the image, to use his term, and "showing, sending and maybe remembering" has always been a component. That's really where photography started, and being about the image came later.
     
  6. jnanian

    jnanian Advertiser Advertiser
    Ads Enabled

    Messages:
    25,457
    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2003
    Location:
    paswonquitte
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    it depends what photography is...
    a person image that is shared with others in an intimate setting
    something tangible ... for most people yes photography is something different.
    they don't make prints or have prints they have files shared with a million people at once.
    but still there are some people that make tangible objects ... that are harder to share.

    i was reading letters fox talbot sent to john hershel in the 1840s ( 1830s ) he was sharing with him
    some photographs he made and said the postal service might have creased them, just iron them or put them
    under something flat and heavy ... no IM, 000111's something tangible.

    but that is what photography morphed into in the 1800s through the age of mechanical reproduction ...

    seems some photographers saw the fork in the road and took it, others kept going.
     
  7. Ko.Fe.

    Ko.Fe. Member
    Ads Enabled

    Messages:
    2,072
    Joined:
    Apr 29, 2014
    Location:
    MiltON.ONtario
    Shooter:
    35mm RF
    These days if something stupid about photography it steady comes from the Guardian, PP or NYT. Too much of too limited or non-photography people.
    Photography as same as it was. Young and/or willing are taking it. Old farts are keeps on talking how they couldn't take it anymore.
     
  8. guangong

    guangong Subscriber
    Ads Enabled

    Messages:
    1,081
    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2009
    Shooter:
    Medium Format
    So is drawing, lithography, etching, wood engraving, and painting. During the 18th & early 19th centuries a complete education included training in drawing in order to record observations. Photography eliminated this need but people still draw and pencils and pens are still available. Photography also replaced the commercial reproduction of illustrations using etching and lithography. For the most part digital capture has replaced commercial photography (think of all the do-dads sold by Leitz and Zeiss that can now be accomplished in a snap with a computer), but this does not mean that photography a creative artistic endeavor will disappear, as APUG attests.
     
  9. jnanian

    jnanian Advertiser Advertiser
    Ads Enabled

    Messages:
    25,457
    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2003
    Location:
    paswonquitte
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    no,
    the difference is that when offset printing came on hard, photography became its illustrator,
    and the whole field of consumer photography is from that path, not the path of using film and paper
    and making photographs ...
    there are 2 kind of photography
    one that is fueled by the publishing industry ( chromogenic film was from that too )
    and the one that isn't ...
    compared to the consumer strain, the publication strain, the printed strain ( as in printed/electronic media )
    film and paper photography is different and one could say dead ..

    if painting and etching &c became a mechanical process that was the main way publications illustrated articles they might suffered the same fate.

    photography's greatest thing ( multiplicity and democraticisation of the photographic image )
    ended up being its biggest flaw ... ( as far as i am concerned )

    walter benjamin was a smart guy
    http://faculty.winthrop.edu/stockk/Contemporary Art/Benjamin mechanical reproduction.pdf
     
  10. cramej

    cramej Subscriber

    Messages:
    390
    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2009
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
  11. faberryman

    faberryman Subscriber

    Messages:
    2,617
    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2016
    Location:
    Nashville
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Perhaps the author and photographer interviewed have not heard of Instax. It seems very popular. It is certainly a money maker for Fuji and they are manufacturing the film 24/7.
     
  12. BrianVS

    BrianVS Member

    Messages:
    287
    Joined:
    Sep 3, 2017
    Location:
    USA
    Shooter:
    Digital
    Hopefully peel-apart Polaroid Film will make a comeback. Looks like he uses a Model 240 with the Zeiss viewfinder in place of the original. I have one just like it, also modified it to use 3 AAA batteries. And a Model 250.
    I still have a few packs of 690 in the Fridge, so it is not over for me.

    [​IMG]Polaroid 250 and 240+ by fiftyonepointsix, on Flickr
     
  13. paulbarden

    paulbarden Member
    Ads Enabled

    Messages:
    700
    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2014
    Location:
    Oregon, Willamette Valley
    Shooter:
    8x10 Format
    I'm happy to continue doing what I do, separate from a world obsessed with iPhones and selfies - the instant gratification model. What I do has absolutely nothing to do with that paradigm. Judging my own work against a world awash in a tsunami of Instagram-filtered imagery is comparing Apples to Seahorses. If I allow Wim Wenders' opinions on the photographic medium matter to me, then I have to judge what I do accordingly and that, it would seem to me, will only suck the joy out of this medium I love. Why would I want to do that??
     
  14. Sponsored Ad
  15. Ian Leake

    Ian Leake Subscriber
    Ads Enabled

    Messages:
    1,495
    Joined:
    Mar 25, 2005
    Location:
    Switzerland
    Shooter:
    8x10 Format
    Didn’t Peter Henry Emerson say something similar a hundred years ago? He was wrong too.
     
  16. Andrew O'Neill

    Andrew O'Neill Subscriber
    Ads Enabled

    Messages:
    2,814
    Joined:
    Jan 16, 2004
    Location:
    Coquitlam,BC Canada
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    It's not over 'til the fat lady sings.
     
  17. MattKing

    MattKing Subscriber
    Ads Enabled

    Messages:
    23,742
    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2005
    Location:
    Delta, BC, Canada
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    I'm not sure that respondents to this thread are paying enough attention to the other parts of what Wim Wenders said, in particular: "You produced something that was, in itself, a singular moment. As such, it had a certain sacredness. That whole notion is gone."
    And more importantly:
    “The culture has changed. It has all gone. I really don’t know why we stick to the word photography any more. There should be a different term, but nobody cared about finding it.”
    It seems to me he would be fairly comfortable here on the "analogue" part of PHOTRIO - we could reassure him that it hasn't gone, it is just very much more localized in niche neighbourhoods.
     
  18. railwayman3

    railwayman3 Member
    Ads Enabled

    Messages:
    2,590
    Joined:
    Apr 5, 2008
    Shooter:
    35mm
    Of course it's not over, it's become more of a specialist, artistic, endeavour, rather than just a way of making quick snapshots. There's also a new interest in specialist techniques and "alternative" processes.

    You might as well say that other artistic pursuits are over, drawing, painting, pottery, and everything else. I was in a large London art store a few weeks ago and was amazed at the variety of supplies available for every possible kind of artistic work, far more than would have even been thought of ten years ago.....definitely not over.
     
  19. ozmoose

    ozmoose Member

    Messages:
    500
    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2006
    Location:
    Plannut Uth and beyond
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Anyone who believes photography is "over" should get themselves a Rolleiflex, and learn to use it.

    The Rollei TLR really brings you back to earth. To me, it's what true photography is really about. Loading the thing with 120 film is a challenge in itself.

    Try it and see.
     
  20. DWThomas

    DWThomas Subscriber
    Ads Enabled

    Messages:
    3,555
    Joined:
    Jun 13, 2006
    Location:
    SE Pennsylvania
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Ha! Encaustic is a method of painting that uses pigments in melted wax. The Egyptians used it to decorate the sarcophagi for their mummies. Besides the fact those have held up remarkably well for thousands of years, people still paint with encaustic today. I've seen one guy work with a bunch of small metal cups in a big electric frying pan for his palette -- reckon that's not historically correct .... :angel:

    (Everything is over -- eventually ...:cry:)
     
  21. Wallendo

    Wallendo Subscriber
    Ads Enabled

    Messages:
    621
    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2013
    Location:
    North Carolina
    Shooter:
    35mm
    It sounds like an older man complaining of the loss of the good old days.

    iPhone photographs are more commonly associated with showing one's food than describing a moment. But, these images can capture a moment as well as a polaroid, with the bonus that you can now give the photo to your target while keeping a perfect copy for yourself. There are now millions of selfies and food pics being taken, but I suspect there are just as many meaningful photographs being taken as ever. It's just that the sheer volume of detritus overshadows the meaningful.

    On the other hand, how we view photographs has changed with younger generations. Instead of holding a photograph for a few moments and appreciating its memories, there is a tendency to look for a few seconds and then swipe to the next image. I suspect the changes in how we view photographs is much much greater than he we make the photographs; i.e., digital viewing has had a greater social impact that digital photo-making.
     
  22. Sirius Glass

    Sirius Glass Subscriber
    Ads Enabled

    Messages:
    28,076
    Joined:
    Jan 18, 2007
    Location:
    Southern California
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Groups:
    Yet another journalist in search of his first original thought. Spoiler Alert: It will never happen.
     
  23. pdeeh

    pdeeh Member
    Ads Enabled

    Messages:
    4,818
    Joined:
    Jun 8, 2012
    Location:
    UK
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Definitely over.
     
  24. jnanian

    jnanian Advertiser Advertiser
    Ads Enabled

    Messages:
    25,457
    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2003
    Location:
    paswonquitte
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    i don't know ...

    out of the MILLIONS who were shooting film in the 1970s+1980s which is what wim wenders' polaroids are about
    THAT time period ( and before that )
    a tiny fraction of a fraction make photographs and use film and make pictures like it was still " 1976 "
    i thint it is a fair generality to make, that isn't to say it is over for YOU but for most people ...
    most people don't even know you can still get 35mm film, or 120 film or anything else ...
    and 30year old air port security people who don't even know what 35mm film is ( a couple of years ago ) ...
    seems like its over ...
     
  25. NJH

    NJH Member

    Messages:
    604
    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2013
    Location:
    Dorset
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    The funny thing is when I talk to non-photographer family and friends or show them a print the first thing they always say is how nice it is to see a print and people don't have that permanency any more that only a solid physical capture of the moment can convey. Did the culture really change or did people forget or become lazy? Sooner or later people will realise that 50,000 pictures on a computer that you never look at is a form of insanity.
     
  26. TheRook

    TheRook Member
    Ads Enabled

    Messages:
    362
    Joined:
    May 18, 2016
    Location:
    Philadelphia
    Shooter:
    35mm
    Furthermore, many of those thousands of pictures that only exist in the digital realm will likely be permanently lost 20 years from now. The only way to preserve a digital image long term is to copy and backup them up regularly, which most people simply don't take the time do. In contrast, prints require very little maintenance for long term preservation.
     
  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies. If you have a Photrio account, please log in (and select 'stay logged in') to prevent recurrence of this notice.