Old Varichrome Pan

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Ektagraphic

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Hello- I have some very old Varichrome Pan in 120 that I would like to attempt to shoot and process in D-76. What ISO should I shoot it at and how long should I develop it?

Thanks
 

Anscojohn

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Depending upon it's age, Verichrome Pan included in it's ASA rating a "safety factor." At that time, IIRC, it was ASA 64; later ASA 125.

I would, thus, compromise and rate it at ASA 100. Although 76 is the standard against which all developers are benchmarked, and although a former mentor of mine shot hundreds of weddings with VP souped in D76, were I souping it I would use Rodinal or HC110 in an attempt to get maximum high-tone separation. VP tended to mush the high tones.
 
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Ektagraphic

Ektagraphic

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But wouldn't there be speed loss?
 

mopar_guy

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I had read that Verichrome Pan had a wider range of sizes of silver halide chrystals in it's emulsion. This gave the film an unusually wide exposure range. If the film is 20-30 years old, I would think about rating at ASA 50-64 (that is overexposing). Overexposure would give more grain. Another tidbit that I have come across in regard to Verichrome Pan is that you could almost always get a decent picture out of it. I just came across a Kodak Verichrome Film Pack expiration Aug 1948. This is the older version Verichrome (NOT Verichrome Pan) and it would be orthochromatic. Have fun with your old film. What's the worst thing that could happen?

Regards,
Dave
 

msage

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Hello- I have some very old Varichrome Pan in 120 that I would like to attempt to shoot and process in D-76. What ISO should I shoot it at and how long should I develop it?

Thanks

How old? Why shoot and process it? The chances are that the quality will be low, why waste the time and effort? I save and collect old film to display with old cameras. Just a though.
Michael
 

juan

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The last data sheet from Kodak is located here. Original time was 9 minutes at 20C in a small tank at 1:1. How old is the film? That should give you a guess as to the exposure.

The film did, indeed, have interesting characteristics. I shot many rolls back in the 70s.
juan
 
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Ektagraphic

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It is pretty old. The 120 spool is metal.
 

MattKing

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Can you post a photo of the wrapper/backing paper?

Some of us may be able to figure out how old it is.

By the way, I certainly shot 120 with metal spools in the 1970s, so it might not be that old :smile:.

Matt
 

rwboyer

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Depending upon it's age, Verichrome Pan included in it's ASA rating a "safety factor." At that time, IIRC, it was ASA 64; later ASA 125.

I would, thus, compromise and rate it at ASA 100. Although 76 is the standard against which all developers are benchmarked, and although a former mentor of mine shot hundreds of weddings with VP souped in D76, were I souping it I would use Rodinal or HC110 in an attempt to get maximum high-tone separation. VP tended to mush the high tones.

Yep Verichrome did tend to have a long slow shoulder compared to modern 100 films but that was part of it's charm. In certain situations this can be a good thing - that is why it is so easy to print. Not unlike TX 400 in this respect. I actually wish that Kodak still made it for some of the subjects that I shoot.

RB
 

kompressor

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I still have a big fridge with the latest run of VP. When i shoot VP at 64 paralell with Plus-x at 64 i often use Xtol 1:1. Well, the film is pretty close in contrast. The RMS og PXP is 10 and VP is 9. Look at the techpubs for those two films. PXP:http://www.kodak.com/global/en/professional/support/techPubs/f4018/f4018.pdf VP:http://www.tmax100.com/photo/pdf/f7.pdf

You masters of de-coding curves, can maybe give us other some good words why they are so close in look. When shooting colourchekers, i see there is a different redering in colours to greyscale, but as i said, contrast, shadow detail and rendering of higlights is pretty close.
 

michaelbsc

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Depending upon it's age, Verichrome Pan included in it's ASA rating a "safety factor." At that time, IIRC, it was ASA 64; later ASA 125.

I would, thus, compromise and rate it at ASA 100. Although 76 is the standard against which all developers are benchmarked, and although a former mentor of mine shot hundreds of weddings with VP souped in D76, were I souping it I would use Rodinal or HC110 in an attempt to get maximum high-tone separation. VP tended to mush the high tones.

Well I have a roll of unknown vintage that was in a camera. Any advice about how to soup that in Rodinol.
 

PHOTOTONE

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When Verichrome Pan was available I used it as my primary medium-format film for black and white, for my professional and personal work. It was my favorite film in 120, and I lamented its demise. It was also the least expensive b/w film in 120 from Kodak. Wish they still made it. I developed it in Wd2d pyro developer and got beautiful, beautiful image tone.
 
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