Nikon MD-4 and fogging film?

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BradS

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....Any others have the rewind capability? My MD11/12/15 I think at least one of them has rewind as part of its feature set.

No. None of those will rewind the film. They all have a little slide thingy that pushes the rewind release button on the bottom of the camera body (because, obviously, the button is inaccessable when the MD is mounted) but one still must rewind manually.
 

Chan Tran

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No. None of those will rewind the film. They all have a little slide thingy that pushes the rewind release button on the bottom of the camera body (because, obviously, the button is inaccessable when the MD is mounted) but one still must rewind manually.

That bring me the question that is there a camera with power rewind and has removable motor drive and doesn't have the hole? Any brands? I know the F2 and F3 both have the hole. The F, the motor drive is the whole back. I wonder about the Canon F1 (any version) and the Pentax LX? I think none of the Olympus OM has power rewind.
 

MattKing

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A Canon Rebel 2000 starts out by winding the film to the end, and then winds it back into the cassette - each frame rewound immediately after it is exposed.
Does that count? 😁
Actually, I often wondered why the pro cameras aimed at photojournalists didn't work that way.
 

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That bring me the question that is there a camera with power rewind and has removable motor drive and doesn't have the hole? Any brands? I know the F2 and F3 both have the hole. The F, the motor drive is the whole back. I wonder about the Canon F1 (any version) and the Pentax LX? I think none of the Olympus OM has power rewind.

Unless the (rewind) motor is built into the body, I don't see how an add-on accessory motor drive could possibly power rewind the film without there being a hole in the bottom of the camera for a shaft to engage the film spool inside the film cartridge. The shaft has to retract so to allow the film to be loaded and unloaded - it cannot just be there. I guess one could posit a complex mechanism with gears and levers and all manner of mechanical clap-trap that could accomplish the task but it seems crazy and uneconomical to do it that way.
 
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No. None of those will rewind the film. They all have a little slide thingy that pushes the rewind release button on the bottom of the camera body (because, obviously, the button is inaccessable when the MD is mounted) but one still must rewind manually.

Ok. I may have been thinking about the F4S I have.
 

Chan Tran

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Unless the (rewind) motor is built into the body, I don't see how an add-on accessory motor drive could possibly power rewind the film without there being a hole in the bottom of the camera for a shaft to engage the film spool inside the film cartridge. The shaft has to retract so to allow the film to be loaded and unloaded - it cannot just be there. I guess one could posit a complex mechanism with gears and levers and all manner of mechanical clap-trap that could accomplish the task but it seems crazy and uneconomical to do it that way.

That is what I thought and I was surprised by the OP comment in his first post that such a design was horrible and bordering on dumb. Back when I bought the F2AS in 1977 I was kind of proud of the hole because my camera could do power rewind (oh well I never had the MD-2 to do that).
 
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That is what I thought and I was surprised by the OP comment in his first post that such a design was horrible and bordering on dumb. Back when I bought the F2AS in 1977 I was kind of proud of the hole because my camera could do power rewind (oh well I never had the MD-2 to do that).

Earlier I had totally forgot about the rewind feature of the MD-4 and thought the hole in the bottom of the camera was a simple oversight. Needed to get my head out of my rear 😂
 

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Is there a camera that has an accessory motordrive with the rewind capability that does NOT have a hole to facilitate rewinding?
My Pentax LX had a hole like the F3.

ok, the Leica R8 and R9 have add on motor drives w rewind that do not have a hole in the baseplate.
 

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Unless the (rewind) motor is built into the body, I don't see how an add-on accessory motor drive could possibly power rewind the film without there being a hole in the bottom of the camera for a shaft to engage the film spool inside the film cartridge. The shaft has to retract so to allow the film to be loaded and unloaded - it cannot just be there. I guess one could posit a complex mechanism with gears and levers and all manner of mechanical clap-trap that could accomplish the task but it seems crazy and uneconomical to do it that way.

Leica R8 and R9 do.
 

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Crazy shizzle! How do they do it?

Interesting…a review at JCH says some early ones scratched film!
https://www.japancamerahunter.com/2022/02/camera-geekery-leica-r8/

Yup my R8 scratched film. There is a nylon guide that the film runs over that pushes it into place. Actually a very cool design that sets tension etc. except that Leics specced too soft a material so it can wear prematurely and scratch film. I fixed mine by applying a tiny piece of scotch tape to the guide! That covered up the rough patch.
 

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A Canon Rebel 2000 starts out by winding the film to the end, and then winds it back into the cassette - each frame rewound immediately after it is exposed.
Does that count? 😁
Actually, I often wondered why the pro cameras aimed at photojournalists didn't work that way.

In a word, "Time".

Once a roll is finished on an F3 with the drive attached, you hit the two sliders with two thumbs, right thumb first on the horizontal slider switch, left thumb immediately after on the vertical slider switch, then while the drive is rewinding the film in you are readying the next roll.

I have two accessory backs, the aforementioned back with the drop tongue that stops the leader being rewound into the cassette and the far better MF18 data back which also has the drop tongue to stop the leader being rewound into the cassette, but also has the ability to imprint data in-between frames, either a numbering sequence, or the date.

Keeping the film leader from being rewound into the cassette certainly helps in reducing dust and debris getting onto the film, more so when you are chucking used cassettes directly into pockets.

Once the camera has rewound, which takes about the same amount of time one takes to get a prepared roll out of your pocket, you flip open the back, pull the used roll out and deposit it into the pocket with used rolls. One then as quickly as you can places the next roll in, pulls the leader across and slides it into one of the slots, hits the shutter once to ensure it is taken up by the slot, shut the back and start hitting the shutter button three times and watching the hand rewind lever to see if the film is indeed loaded correctly. This is about as quick as it gets, and after your third shutter button press, either on the camera or on the drive, you should be ready to start exposing film again.

If you have a flash on the camera it is advisable to slide the locking cover back so you can see if the film is winding on, if it is, re-lock the flash on the camera immediately otherwise it will start to fall off if you point the camera to the ground. I managed to get pretty proficient at fast as anything film changes.

The inbuilt externally read frame counter directly under the knurled locking ring, is also handy in checking whether or not you are better off rewinding a not fully used roll during a pause in proceedings and quickly loading a new full roll ready for the next rush of whatever you are photographing. I mainly used that frame counter when the camera was on a fairly tall tripod and I was sometimes standing on a chair at the back with either a 180mm or 300mm lens.

For what it's worth, at least twice that I can remember, I took the drive off midway through a roll and kept on using the camera forgetting to replace the little screw in cover. I don't recall film being damaged as the film cassette sort of neatly covers the whole hole; great design foresight.
 
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For what it's worth, at least twice that I can remember, I took the drive off midway through a roll and kept on using the camera forgetting to replace the little screw in cover. I don't recall film being damaged as the film cassette sort of neatly covers the whole hole; great design foresight.

This makes perfect sense and puts to sleep my concerns. Thanks! I just couldn't get my head around that design for some dumb reason.
 

Rob Skeoch

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I own an F3 with the motor,I have to admit I hadn't even thought of taking the motor off and winding the camera myself until about six months ago. They were always paired together, but the motor makes it heavy and I'm not shooting anything fast moving anyway.
But this is for sure.... the F3 with the motor is the coolest sounding camera ever on the market. It sounds like a real camera should, whatever that means.
 
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I own an F3 with the motor,I have to admit I hadn't even thought of taking the motor off and winding the camera myself until about six months ago. They were always paired together, but the motor makes it heavy and I'm not shooting anything fast moving anyway.
But this is for sure.... the F3 with the motor is the coolest sounding camera ever on the market. It sounds like a real camera should, whatever that means.

You are so right! I also have the F4S and it's not quite the same, but it's awesome in its own way. The F3 is just different indeed.
 

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It’s such a classic sound that my iPhone makes it with every exposure. Most folks may not know where that sound originated.
 

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A Nikon FM2 w the MD12 motodrive makes that awesome Duran Duran Girls on Film sound too. Back from the day when cameras were loud and proud!
 

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Some of our US members probably would like the sound of the Koni-Omegafilm advance the best - nothing come closer to the sound of a pump-action shotgun.
 

rulnacco

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Oh yeah I totally understand it's reason for being there. I wasn't sure about the F2. Any others have the rewind capability? My MD11/12/15 I think at least one of them has rewind as part of its feature set. I can't check as I'm not home lol

None of those three can rewind the film. The MD-11 and MD-12 were made for the FM/FE series of cameras, and the MD-15 was built for the FA. None of those cameras have a hole in the base for a rewind motor to engage the film cassette.

As others have said, your film will *probably* be entirely okay, and if you'd just loaded it before realizing the cap wasn't on the body and hadn't shot any frames, only the first shot or two on the roll would have any possibility of being affected anyway--the felt light trap across the cassette's aperture will keep light from exposing film that hasn't been extracted from the cassette yet. Not only that, the film itself is pretty opaque and resistant to light coming passing entirely through it. I've had some accidents where the film closest to where the light could get at it other than through the lens was exposed, but the film that was rolled up under that film (other than where the sprocket holes let light through) was entirely or completely unexposed, so long as the accidental exposure to light was brief and of low intensity.

ADDENDUM: Sorry, didn't realize there was a Page 2 already, and someone had already answered the question about the MDs you have. I once did the same thing and pulled my MD-4 off with a partly exposed roll of film in, briefly and in interior lighting, and I didn't notice any ill effects from it. Not sure what would have happened if I'd been in bright sunlight or left it off for a long period, however.
 
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None of those three can rewind the film. The MD-11 and MD-12 were made for the FM/FE series of cameras, and the MD-15 was built for the FA. None of those cameras have a hole in the base for a rewind motor to engage the film cassette.

As others have said, your film will *probably* be entirely okay, and if you'd just loaded it before realizing the cap wasn't on the body and hadn't shot any frames, only the first shot or two on the roll would have any possibility of being affected anyway--the felt light trap across the cassette's aperture will keep light from exposing film that hasn't been extracted from the cassette yet. Not only that, the film itself is pretty opaque and resistant to light coming passing entirely through it. I've had some accidents where the film closest to where the light could get at it other than through the lens was exposed, but the film that was rolled up under that film (other than where the sprocket holes let light through) was entirely or completely unexposed, so long as the accidental exposure to light was brief and of low intensity.

ADDENDUM: Sorry, didn't realize there was a Page 2 already, and someone had already answered the question about the MDs you have. I once did the same thing and pulled my MD-4 off with a partly exposed roll of film in, briefly and in interior lighting, and I didn't notice any ill effects from it. Not sure what would have happened if I'd been in bright sunlight or left it off for a long period, however.

Thanks for your reply! I'm just going to go forward with it and see how it all goes. I'll be ok I think as it had just been loaded.
 
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