Newbie to color

Discussion in 'Color: Film, Paper, and Chemistry' started by photo8x10, Feb 25, 2009.

  1. photo8x10

    photo8x10 Member

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    Dear all,
    I've always shooted and printing on black and white, and I'm still doing for a long long time in the future, because my photography is that, but a friend of mine would like a my work in contact but in color. I haven't any knowledge about this kind of process, so here a few questions?

    1) What kind of films(I use only 8x10)?

    2) Paper(supra endura or Fuji cristal archive Type C)

    3) Enlarger with color head or filter?If fthe filter ok could I use the ilfordchrome filter that I had?

    4) could in case use the developer of film to extend or contrat the film scale?

    Before to accept to do this work, I would like to know if it will possible or try to change his mind to do it in B/W....

    Thanks

    Stefano
     
  2. Greg Davis

    Greg Davis Subscriber

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    Stefano, I shoot 8x10 color, and I use Kodak Portra 160NC. It is a neutral color film. The VC type is more vivid in color. Fuji also makes 8x10, it has very good colors, but I don't like it for skin, but some people do. For darkroom printing you may want to use negative film, not the positive film. Printing from positive is very different

    You cannot develop it longer for more contrast. It does not act like B&W film at all. Film can be developed at home, but the process and chemicals are very different. See if any labs near you can do C-41 process for 8x10. If you find you do it enough to spend the money to set up a home darkroom for it, then do so.

    Printing is very different. You will not use the filters for B&W paper. You will need special printing filters for color paper. A color enlarger head will be easier to use, but very expensive in this size. I am trying to adapt a 4x5 head to a larger film size, but have not finished enough to see if it will work. You will also need filters called Viewing Filters. These help you see what color is too strong in the print, and make corrections.

    I scan my film and email it to a company that makes prints for me on Kodak Endura. It is cheaper than I could do it at home with my level of skill. This may be an alternative for you.

    Good luck. Ciao!
     
  3. tiberiustibz

    tiberiustibz Member

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    It's easiest to print negative film although impressive slide prints can be made, albeit for a higher cost.

    You can use color printing filters. I think it would be easier to pick up a color enlarger or a color head to print with; they're cheap.

    Contrast is controlled during exposure or with contrast masking. Overexposure (more than box speed) decreases contrast. Film choice also makes a difference.

    This is an article I wrote for starting out in color printing:

    http://www.apug.org/forums/forum221/58260-ra-4-printing-200-a.html
     
  4. John Shriver

    John Shriver Member

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    The Ilfochrome filters will do fine for optical printing.

    Supra Endura is the last RA-4 paper Kodak makes that is compatible with optical printing and is available in sheets. (Ultra Endura is now only in long rolls, and the natural color Portra Endura is completely discontinued.) Color printing is relentlessly progressing towards 100% digital.

    If you want a natural saturation low-contrast image, you just can't get it anymore in optical printing, since the demise of Portra Endura. Supra Endura has somewhat elevated contrast, and high color saturation. If you want to control contrast, the only way is through a digital darkroom work-flow, scan the film, print digitally on RA-4 or inkjet.
     
  5. PHOTOTONE

    PHOTOTONE Member

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    If you are making contact color prints from 8x10 color negatives, you can easily use an inexpensive small format color enlarger as a light source. The enlarger does not have to be big enough to make enlargements from 8x10.
     
  6. tiberiustibz

    tiberiustibz Member

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    There are chemical methods to alter the contrast of the developer. Reducing contrast that way is fairly easy. PE could fill you in. It was in a thread a bit back.
     
  7. E76

    E76 Member

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    I wonder if Fujicolor Crystal Archive Super Type P would be a suitable replacement for Portra Endura. Fuji advertises it as a paper specially designed for portraits and it's still available in sheets.
     
  8. L Gebhardt

    L Gebhardt Subscriber

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    Do you know if it is still available in glossy? All I've been able to find lately is luster. I still have some Portra Endura and most of an 8x10 box of Super Type P, but I've been wondering what to get once this stock runs out/expires.
     
  9. OP
    OP
    photo8x10

    photo8x10 Member

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    Thanks a lot for all your replies, I've just read the article and it's very interesting.
    Now I had lots of information to decide my way on colour. My first step will be to shoot on 8x10 colour and I'll try to developed it, I have a CPE2, so in this case I'm able to try this process, after I'll try to make some prints, before using the filter that I have, if I should decide to dedicate a bit more time on colour to prepare a colour portfolio, I'm quite sure that I'll buy a little enlarger for colour.. I also quite lucky before it's easily to find in Europe this kind of materials(film,paper, chemical). Now I have lots of Black and White prints to do, so I'll pass a bit of time reading all the information that I'm finding on Apug, when I'll have more time I shoot in colour....

    Stefano