Medium Format Resolution

Discussion in 'Scanning and Scanners' started by AlNY, Mar 9, 2018.

  1. AlNY

    AlNY Member

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    Hi.
    I recently got an RB67 (the one that fell) and shot a few rolls in Kodak 400TX in a studio setting. I used. 127 mm lens and lighting was confirmed with a Sekonik meter.

    I processed the rolls myself in HC110 for 7 mins at 68 degrees, 30 sec stop and 10 min fix.
    I scanned the negatives on an Epson 850 scanner and examined them on a computer. When I compared the scanned images to those from my Canon 1d mkii, (shot at same f stop with an,80 mm lens) I found that the Canon image was way better. Especially when enlarged them, the resolution of the 8.2 mp image was way better.

    Please tell me what I am doing wrong. I remember getting some,low res scans of medium format film,a,few yeara ago that were amazing.

    Thanks.
     
  2. Les Sarile

    Les Sarile Member

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    Can you provide examples?

    Also, how was it scanned years ago - what scanner?
     
  3. Hatchetman

    Hatchetman Subscriber

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    Probably scanning issues of some sort. That is a whole can of worms to figure out.
     
  4. faberryman

    faberryman Subscriber

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    The V850 has an actual resolution of 2300 and can't resolve the grain, so I suspect your 1D images look sharper.
     
  5. jeffreyg

    jeffreyg Subscriber

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    At what ppi are you scanning the negatives? Try a resolution of 2400 or at least 1200 to compare make sure the negatives are held flat in the carrier. Down size the file later according to need.

    http://www.jeffreyglasser.com/
     
  6. Hatchetman

    Hatchetman Subscriber

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    There are a million things it could be when it comes to scanning. A "raw" 6x7 file scan is going to be huge, like 40-60MB. I don't let any scanning software do anything for me. I move it to Photoshop where I do the sharpening, etc.
     
  7. OP
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    AlNY

    AlNY Member

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    Thanks everybody.

    Just a few details I left out .I used HC110 dilution B. I scanned at 1600 dpi, 4800dpi and around 6000 dpi. The old scans were from "Dans" I believe.

    I don't have access to the images now. At work and will upload later.
    I will continue to play with the scanner and will send a roll to the lab. Just surprised at the lack,of resolution with the neg/scanner combo.
    Thanks for the advice. Maybe when you see the images the issue may be more defined.

    Al
     
  8. destroya

    destroya Subscriber

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    its the scanning. I took a 6x7 tmax 400 neg. I scanned it on my nikon cs9000 and the wet printed the same neg. the scanned neg was clearly inferior to the wet print. the scanned neg did look ok, better than the digital 18mp camera print, but both were no match for the wet print. Scanning, I read someplace, reduces potential quality of a print in half unless you get a drum scan. Not sure I agree its that extreme, but it does make a difference.

    scan at your scanners true resolving power and try again. also, if you can, get it wet printed and see for yourself if its the camera of the scanner. unless you have a drum scanner, the scanning will be the weak link in the chain
     
  9. Les Sarile

    Les Sarile Member

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    By inferior do you mean detail/sharpness? If so, how big a print did you make and what kind of paper did you use that it showed more detail then a Coolscan 4000dpi scan?
     
  10. faberryman

    faberryman Subscriber

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    You need to scan at 4800 to achieve the maximum 2300 the V850 is capable of. If you scan at a lower setting, you will not achieve maximum resolution.
     
  11. jawarden

    jawarden Subscriber

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    Without seeing both the Canon and RB67 images it won't be possible to opine, other than to suggest that if your RB is working properly, and if you've made a quality negative, and if you've scanned it properly with your home scanner, the two images ought to be comparable if viewed at the same pixel size.

    If your negative is professionally scanned though with a higher end scanner the RB quality will surpass the Canon.
     
  12. Ted Baker

    Ted Baker Member

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    Maybe worth checking the "focus", by using little adjustments on the holders, or consider an after market holder.

    If comparing jpegs from your canon they will have been sharpened, the epson certain needs some sharpening, if your using USM try a radius of .6 and 350% as a starting point before any resizing. YMMV
     
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    AlNY

    AlNY Member

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    Inferior as to details. The Canon image shows way more detail when enlarged on the screen and maintaims that detail. I will upload images tonight.
     
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    AlNY

    AlNY Member

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    Will try that. Thank you.
     
  16. Les Sarile

    Les Sarile Member

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    My response was to destroya since he referenced a Coolscan compared to print but your results from a flatbed on screen is another matter.
     
  17. Ted Baker

    Ted Baker Member

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    Also consider turning your negs upside down, the recommended epson way reduces the risk of newtons rings, but the other way may keep part of the neg in better focus. If that makes a difference then I would defenitely consider after market holders to keep if flat and the correct height.
     
  18. OP
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    AlNY

    AlNY Member

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    Attached are the images. They were processed minimally in Apple "Photos". ( I wish Apeture was still around)
     

    Attached Files:

  19. Les Sarile

    Les Sarile Member

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    If these are the actual files you are comparing on-screen then the first thing you have to change is the scan resolution. You have to increase your scan resolution to at least 4800. Maybe even try 6400 and see if it makes a difference in actual detail achieved. If the results of a scan from medium format 6X7 film are less detail then an 8MP sensor in the EOS-1D Mark II, then something is grossly wrong - either the detail was not captured on film or the scanner is unable to resolve the detail on the film.
     
  20. OP
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    AlNY

    AlNY Member

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    I just scanned another negative. Did not adjust anything in the scanning software and purchased Affinity. Increased the resolution to 4800.It seems better.Will upload.

    The scans are better but are HUGE. The last scan was 110mp.. Although the scans are better, I guess I'm not used to the grain of the skin at increased magnification on the computer screen. The smaller digital file seems to resolve the skin with more detail.
     
    Last edited: Mar 9, 2018
  21. Les Sarile

    Les Sarile Member

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    I don't have much experience with TRI-X but from the limited use I've had with it, I've found it to be grainier then TMAX 400. If grain is a concern, perhaps a different developer would improve it or maybe TMAX 400 would be better for you.

    Once scanned, the files are huge but when sized down to your final target, the grain is less pronounced, Perhaps you might try some grain reduction also.
     
  22. OP
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    AlNY

    AlNY Member

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    Thank you all for the advice.

    Al
     
  23. jim10219

    jim10219 Member

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    You can’t resolve the grain with a flatbed scanner. Not even close. It may look like you can see film grain on the computer screen, but you’re actually just seeing pixels. The best way to “scan” a negative at home is with a digital camera and a good macro lens and extension tube. You basically backlight the negative and take multiple closeup shots and stitch them together in an image editing software like Photoshop. From there, you’ll want to sharpen the image using an unsharp mask. You always have to sharpen a scan if you don’t want blurry images. How many shots depends on the resolution of your digital camera, how much time you want to spend with it, and what kind of macro lens you use. Of course you could also send them out for a drum scan, but that’s expensive.

    A 6x7 camera with good film and a good lens ought to get you an image comparable to something around a 30-50 MP digital camera. The hard part is extracting all of that information and getting it into the computer.
     
  24. Les Sarile

    Les Sarile Member

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    Do you have some results that support these?
     
  25. jim10219

    jim10219 Member

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    Yes, but I don't have a way to upload files of that size to this site, plus, I don't want to go through all of the hassle. But it's well documented on the internet. You can Google it all for yourself if you like.

    Here's a link to a website that shows a bit about what I mean with some real world examples:
    https://emulsive.org/articles/scann...rum-scanner-vs-epson-v700-with-bonus-sony-a7r
     
  26. jim10219

    jim10219 Member

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