Materials can inspire an artist.

Discussion in 'Ethics and Philosophy' started by frank, Oct 4, 2014.

  1. frank

    frank Member

    Messages:
    4,376
    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2002
    Location:
    Canada
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Materials can inspire an artist, and a new/different camera can inspire a photographer.

    Discuss?
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 4, 2014
  2. aRolleiBrujo

    aRolleiBrujo Member

    Messages:
    803
    Joined:
    Apr 23, 2013
    Location:
    Modesto Ca
    Shooter:
    Medium Format
    Especially a lens that offers the ability that other lenses may or may not. For instance, the Nikkor 85mm 1.4 AIS lens that I used on my DSLR gave me the ability to capture this image, of my cat, as I sort of imagined it, knowing the "bokeh" abilities that that particular lens aperture offered! No, it is not the sharpest photo in the world, however, I did my best! Next, I am going to try to figure out how I can attempt something similar with a film camera, most like a Nikon F series or something affordable!

    [​IMG]Luna Bleu by a.rodriguezpix, on Flickr
     
  3. cliveh

    cliveh Subscriber
    Ads Enabled

    Messages:
    5,463
    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2010
    Shooter:
    35mm RF
    If the photographer is already into art, can they not also be inspired by creative materials used in a photographic context, regardless of whether a camera is used or not?
     
  4. pdeeh

    pdeeh Member
    Ads Enabled

    Messages:
    4,815
    Joined:
    Jun 8, 2012
    Location:
    UK
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    could you give an exampleof that Clive, please?
     
  5. cliveh

    cliveh Subscriber
    Ads Enabled

    Messages:
    5,463
    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2010
    Shooter:
    35mm RF
  6. pdeeh

    pdeeh Member
    Ads Enabled

    Messages:
    4,815
    Joined:
    Jun 8, 2012
    Location:
    UK
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    thanks.

    I realise I have seen similar types of work at the millennium in St Ives in the past.
     
  7. aRolleiBrujo

    aRolleiBrujo Member

    Messages:
    803
    Joined:
    Apr 23, 2013
    Location:
    Modesto Ca
    Shooter:
    Medium Format
    Or the exact opposite! I for one wish I could draw however, I am challenged in that area, however, I had been attempting to draw using pen, pencil, paper, only after taking photographs, because I felt if I could draw it I could convey my thoughts to paper, which I felt would be cool! I had always wanted to interpret books I have read, into photography, and of course drawing! I'm sure this is basic, but, for me, it is not. :D:blink:
     
  8. cliveh

    cliveh Subscriber
    Ads Enabled

    Messages:
    5,463
    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2010
    Shooter:
    35mm RF
    I have heard other people quote this thing about 'wish I could draw but I can't and that's why I do photography'. The ability to draw is not a god given gift at birth, but one that can be acquired with practice, like many other techniques, such as bricklaying, plastering, photography, etc.
     
  9. aRolleiBrujo

    aRolleiBrujo Member

    Messages:
    803
    Joined:
    Apr 23, 2013
    Location:
    Modesto Ca
    Shooter:
    Medium Format
    That is true, however, I think I should master photography first! I wouldn't want to offend the eye's of the world! xD :tongue:
     
  10. snapguy

    snapguy Member

    Messages:
    1,292
    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2014
    Location:
    California d
    Shooter:
    35mm
    inspire

    The Impressionists were inspired by new oil paint colors that enabled them to make images never seen before. The "old guard" in "art" thought they were just drawing cheesy, sleazy pictures.
    My "new" 60-year-old Rolleiflex inspires me to go out and take some (hopefully) great photos of gigantic cactus plants using a square format I have not used for quite a while. I'm just agonizing about what b&w film to buy. S-L-O-W, methinks.
     
  11. OP
    OP
    frank

    frank Member

    Messages:
    4,376
    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2002
    Location:
    Canada
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    My life experience leads me to believe otherwise.
    While ones ability to draw may improve with practice, ones maximum potential to draw is a given gift at birth. I see it in the difference between my family compared to my wife's family. There is an inate and natural drawing ability in several members of my family over several generations that is completely absent in my wife's family. It's like singing or dancing, or mathematical ability. Practice may improve this ability but even with unlimited dedication and practice, not everyone can become great at these endeavors. I believe this emphatically.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 4, 2014
  12. cliveh

    cliveh Subscriber
    Ads Enabled

    Messages:
    5,463
    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2010
    Shooter:
    35mm RF
    I was once of the same opinion, but do not now believe this to be true. This question is probably worth a thread of it's own.
     
  13. OP
    OP
    frank

    frank Member

    Messages:
    4,376
    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2002
    Location:
    Canada
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    True. Lets do that.
     
  14. winger

    winger Subscriber
    Ads Enabled

    Messages:
    3,486
    Joined:
    Jan 13, 2005
    Location:
    southwest PA
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    I agree with Clive and think this is part of the "myth of talent." Some people seem to find they have skill with something early in life and put effort into it, making it look as if they are more talented at it. But someone who doesn't try something until later in life may still be able to gain the skill, they just may not be as ready to try given their advanced years. I've been using a camera since I was about 5, so my head wraps around most photography ideas relatively easily. I like drawing, though I haven't taken the time to put as much practice into it as I have photography.

    As for the OP - yes, I think adding a totally different lens (like a fisheye) or changing formats can inspire a new direction in an artist. A few years ago, I acquired an old window (there's a shot with it in my gallery here) and thinking about how to use it has led to several shots I wouldn't have tried otherwise, including some that don't have the window at all. Everything leads to something else.
     
  15. OP
    OP
    frank

    frank Member

    Messages:
    4,376
    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2002
    Location:
    Canada
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    There s a new thread with this secondary topic of innate ability.
     
  16. Arklatexian

    Arklatexian Subscriber
    Ads Enabled

    Messages:
    1,280
    Joined:
    Jul 28, 2014
    Location:
    Shreveport,
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Snapguy! Methinks S-L-O-W also, with the Rollei sitting atop a nice rigid tripod.
     
  17. jnanian

    jnanian Advertiser Advertiser
    Ads Enabled

    Messages:
    25,072
    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2003
    Location:
    paswonquitte
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    hi cliveh,

    first, thank you for posting a link to the starn twins, they have been at if for a very long time
    and are like midas ... they are fantastic ( and i wish the link you posted was still there, )
    since your link is on the blink hereL http://www.dmstarn.com
    with regards to drawing &c .. i think some people are hard wired to be able to do certain things
    or it is easier for them to do these things. throughout elementary school and high school i was expose to
    drawing classes and painting ( through regular "art" class" ) and in fact i wasn't allowed to take my first photography class
    until i took a foundation art class where i struggled through life drawing and a perspective drawing sort of class. even with a ruler
    i can't draw a straight line. i have a problem of my perspective constantly shifting so it really can't draw anything life-like, maybe
    cubist, yes, but lifelike, nope. in college i took a painting class and architctural rendering class and maybe it was because i was older?
    but i gave up trying to draw the way i had always been taught, and improvised using the skills i had. i can't really draw
    very well, and don't really try to squeeze my abilities into the box but i still sketch / draw / trace / color every day.
    if i draw a chair and it looks like the legs aren't the same length and the adz used to carve out the seat was all screwed up
    i don't really care .. and its the not caring and just letting what i can do get a little better ( and accepting that i can't draw a chair )
    that gets me a little bit better every time i pick up a pencil or charcoal or whatever. and it is the same with photography.
    its realizing there is no such thing as perfection that has allowed me to be a little less inhibited and enjoy myself.

    so in the end, sure ... i use a camera and film & paper &c because i can't draw, but i can't really photograph either. and realizing
    that i can't do much is what allows me to do more... and not caring feeds into it even more .
    no clue if that makes any sense ...
     
  18. cliveh

    cliveh Subscriber
    Ads Enabled

    Messages:
    5,463
    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2010
    Shooter:
    35mm RF
    Where is this drawing, painting gene? Practise makes perfect.
     
  19. jnanian

    jnanian Advertiser Advertiser
    Ads Enabled

    Messages:
    25,072
    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2003
    Location:
    paswonquitte
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    it is a bunch of things all wrapped up into one action.
    if you are near sighted in one eye and far in another
    and don't see in stereo then the things you paint or draw
    will look nothng like someone who isn't those things ...
    its acceptence of one's own abilities and rolling with it ..
     
  20. guangong

    guangong Subscriber
    Ads Enabled

    Messages:
    1,012
    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2009
    Shooter:
    Medium Format
    For almost every art a workmanlike ability can be acquired with study and practice, but every art requires a unique knack that cannot be taught. Those that can find this knack are the fortunate. This does not mean that the remainder cannot enjoy the study and pursuit of this elusive knack,even if unsuccessful. The quest is everything.
    Life drawing used to be taught as a disciplined way of teaching the student to see what is, rather than what they know, and to train a coordination between eye and hand. Nowadays, this is not always the case. Photography can also teach one to see. How many APUG members have seen a great picture when no camera was at hand?
     
  21. jim10219

    jim10219 Member
    Ads Enabled

    Messages:
    801
    Joined:
    Jun 15, 2017
    Location:
    Oklahoma
    Shooter:
    4x5 Format
    Quite true. I have been able to draw fairly well many times in my life, however now is not one of those times. I haven’t drawn anything in a long time and am horribly out of practice. One thing I always resented was being told how lucky I was to be able to draw well. It insulted the years of practice and dedication I gave to the craft.

    I find photography much more difficult than painting or drawing. With painting or drawing, you can control everything. With photography, much is out of your control and left up to luck. What attracted me to photography was the speed at which work could be created, and recreated. I also appreciate the challenge of a new medium.

    As for the materials, I like to do a lot of alternative process and special effects photographs, which allows me to treat photography as a form of painting. Manipulating negatives, chemicals, and paper can open up whole new worlds beyond just documenting events.
     
  22. guangong

    guangong Subscriber
    Ads Enabled

    Messages:
    1,012
    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2009
    Shooter:
    Medium Format
    How true! The beautiful possible photograph marred by the glaring Budweiser can.
     
  23. jnanian

    jnanian Advertiser Advertiser
    Ads Enabled

    Messages:
    25,072
    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2003
    Location:
    paswonquitte
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    but what was inside the budweiser can might have been the materials that
    inspired the artist .. :wink:
     
  24. slackercrurster

    slackercrurster Member
    Ads Enabled

    Messages:
    369
    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2017
    Location:
    L.A. - NYC - Rustbelt
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    OP...yes! Infrared flash and a few other specialties opened up a new world of prospects for me. But it still goes back to basic, straight photography for me.

    For others they may need something exotic to make it happen and have little foundation in the plane Jane methods.
     
  25. guangong

    guangong Subscriber
    Ads Enabled

    Messages:
    1,012
    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2009
    Shooter:
    Medium Format
    In pre-photography times learning to sketch was considered part of an educated persons education, along with Latin and Greek. Even those who did not identify themselves as visual artists made drawings and sketches as aids to memory. Not everyone was a drawing master but their sketches served their needs.
     
  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies. If you have a Photrio account, please log in (and select 'stay logged in') to prevent recurrence of this notice.