Lubricating gears on view cameras

Venice030

A
Venice030

  • 0
  • 0
  • 0
On a summer day.

H
On a summer day.

  • 0
  • 0
  • 20
Spirochete

A
Spirochete

  • 0
  • 0
  • 32
The Kress Building

A
The Kress Building

  • 0
  • 0
  • 56
V3.jpg

A
V3.jpg

  • 1
  • 2
  • 155

Recent Classifieds

Forum statistics

Threads
177,830
Messages
2,441,296
Members
94,324
Latest member
OjoocomNetwork
Recent bookmarks
0

David A. Goldfarb

Moderator
Moderator
Joined
Sep 7, 2002
Messages
19,847
Location
Honolulu, Ha
Shooter
Large Format
On my Technika I just use a little lith grease. You can get it at a hardware or auto parts store. A small tube or container will last a lifetime.

You can clean out old grease with naphtha.
 

mikepry

Subscriber
Joined
Mar 16, 2003
Messages
444
Location
Manasota Key, FL
Shooter
Large Format
Ronson Lighter Fluid = Naptha
 

gma

Member
Joined
Mar 10, 2004
Messages
788
Location
Texas
Shooter
Multi Format
Silicone grease such as Permatex dielectric tune-up grease lubricant is good. It does not drip and very little is required for gears, threads and other small parts.
 
Joined
Dec 11, 2003
Messages
183
Shooter
8x10 Format
This year I went on a photographic trip / workshop in Iceland. I guess I don't have to explain that it gets cold there. My metallic Kodak Master 8x10 got quite sticky at those temperatures. I was wandering if pure silicone or even graphite would be a better option.
I think it has to be a dry lubricant to avoid dirt sticking in to it. Maybe something with teflon?
 

Flotsam

Member
Joined
Sep 30, 2002
Messages
3,221
Location
S.E. New Yor
I think that if I had a problem with my 4x5, I might try paraffin first. I used to use it on my bicycle chains. Good lubrication, stays where it's put, doesn't pick up dirt, not greasy.
 

Jorge

Member
Joined
Sep 6, 2002
Messages
4,515
Shooter
Large Format
Well, what kind of gears are these? If they are brass all you need to do is clean them very well, brass does not need a lubricant to work properly. In fact it is worse if you do it, since mostly is gathers more dust and makes it worse.

If the camera is made of wood, you run the risk of getting the lubricant between the brass or metal gear and the wood, which can cause wood rot.

I am going to go against the grain here and recommend you do not lubricate, just clean very thoroughly, if necessary with a tooth brush, but leave the lubrication alone.
 

dr bob

Member
Joined
Sep 7, 2002
Messages
870
Location
Annapolis, M
Shooter
Medium Format
I go with Jorge. My experience with various lubricants has been variable but mostly bad. To make your wood parts slip (like the older negative carriers) try rubbing a very little bees wax on a spare carrier and slip it in and out a couple of times. Then wipe it down with a soft lintless cloth or a product like Kem-wipe. It will not migrate into unwanted areas. It lasts a long time and is quite stable.
 

wfwhitaker

Member
Joined
Feb 6, 2004
Messages
565
Location
Lobsta
Shooter
Multi Format
There's a product called Slide-All marketed by Elmer's (as in Elmer's glue...) which consists of microscopic particles of Teflon in an aerosol spray. Once the propellent evaporates, the result is a dry lubricant. Overspray can be a problem, but it wipes up easily as long as it's in an accessible area. I've used it with great success to lubricate Grafmatic holders and occasionally rails on a field camera.
 

JackRosa

Member
Joined
Nov 23, 2004
Messages
447
Location
Oklahoma, US
Shooter
Multi Format
I also go with Jorge. It depends upon what type of gears we are discussing. If they are brass (or similar) gears, I would recommend graphite - you can purchase graphite powder at any auto parts store or simply take a #2 (or softer pencil - e.g. B) and use the graphite tip of the pencil on the gears. Graphite works wonders on brass gears!
 
Joined
Dec 11, 2003
Messages
183
Shooter
8x10 Format
wfwhitaker said:
There's a product called Slide-All marketed by Elmer's (as in Elmer's glue...) which consists of microscopic particles of Teflon in an aerosol spray. Once the propellent evaporates, the result is a dry lubricant. Overspray can be a problem, but it wipes up easily as long as it's in an accessible area. I've used it with great success to lubricate Grafmatic holders and occasionally rails on a field camera.

And where do you get the Slide-All made by Elmers? Funny that you have to buy a lubricant from the manufacturers of glue.
 

BarrieB

Member
Joined
Apr 19, 2003
Messages
109
Location
Melbourne, A
Shooter
Multi Format
Monorail or Field Camera ?
Most parts if kept clean are better off with-out any lubricants as the amount of use / movements will not cause much wear, however you can spray some Silicone onto a rag and apply it sparingly to moving parts, often it is the rails that rub together than need some lubrication, not the gears. Grit, sand or dust in /on gears is bad so do not use oil.
 

wfwhitaker

Member
Joined
Feb 6, 2004
Messages
565
Location
Lobsta
Shooter
Multi Format
Christian Olivet said:
And where do you get the Slide-All made by Elmers?

I get it at the local Ace Hardware. I'm sure it's available at other similar retailers.
 
Joined
Dec 11, 2003
Messages
183
Shooter
8x10 Format
wfwhitaker said:
I get it at the local Ace Hardware. I'm sure it's available at other similar retailers.

Cool I'got one Ace hardware close by! Will check for it!
 
Photrio.com contains affiliate links to products. We may receive a commission for purchases made through these links.
To read our full affiliate disclosure statement please click Here.

PHOTRIO PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Ilford ADOX Freestyle Photographic Stearman Press Weldon Color Lab
Top Bottom