Light Meter

Discussion in 'Medium Format Cameras and Accessories' started by Pieter12, Jun 14, 2018.

  1. Pieter12

    Pieter12 Member
    Ads Enabled

    Messages:
    125
    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2017
    Location:
    Santa Monica, CA
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    I recently acquired a Rolleicord V that I intend to use for candid (including street) photography. The Rollei does't have a meter, so I am looking for recommendations for a (small) hand-held reflected meter. So far, I am leaning toward the Gossen Luna Pro, but not sure what else is out there.
     
  2. jimjm

    jimjm Subscriber
    Ads Enabled

    Messages:
    604
    Joined:
    May 2, 2007
    Location:
    San Diego CA
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    The Luna Pro is a good meter, but definitely not one of the smaller ones out there. I use a Sekonic Twinmate L208 for walking-around if using a meterless camera. It's been really accurate and I haven't yet changed the battery in over 6 years. Easy to carry in your pocket.
     
  3. cb1

    cb1 Member
    Ads Enabled

    Messages:
    88
    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2015
    Location:
    D/FW, TX
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    I used a L308S for my meterless cameras, but I wanted to learn more about spot metering so I picked up the sekonic L758DR. I know it is pricey, but I want to learn more so I can get paid for this stuff. LOL
     
  4. Marcelo Paniagua

    Marcelo Paniagua Member
    Ads Enabled

    Messages:
    270
    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2016
    Location:
    Mexicali,Mexico
    Shooter:
    35mm RF
    Gossen Lunapro is really good for low light so if planning for shooting that way, really recommend it. That one is one of my lightmeters and the one I use the more.

    Marcelo
     
  5. Paul Howell

    Paul Howell Subscriber
    Ads Enabled

    Messages:
    3,783
    Joined:
    Dec 23, 2004
    Location:
    Phoeinx Ariz
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    The Gossen is a great meter, reads well in very low light. For battery-less options, Weston IV, some of the old GE meters also work well. I have both a Weston and GE, the GE has a hood that comes off for low light, very accurate. I also have Weston Ranger 9, it uses batteries. I use hearing aid batteries, it's very accurate and does better in low light than a Master IV. For street work I would stay away from incident meters, a reflective average meter will do just as well once you learn how to use it. I have not tired but many seem to like to use a smart phone with down loaded app, there are several on the market.
     
  6. saman13

    saman13 Member

    Messages:
    365
    Joined:
    Mar 28, 2017
    Location:
    Sarasota, Florida
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    I got one luna pro, liked it so much I got another (mostly to get the spot attachment that was on it). They're good meters, accurate and intuitive, but as mentioned above, not pocketable. I was expecting something much smaller when I got my first one. You don't much notice it hanging around your neck though. It's a little smaller than the screen of an iphone (but obviously thicker).

    If you have a soldering iron, you can easily adjust these to use modern batteries. See this video:


    Using a schottky diode, I did the modification in about 10 minutes. I now have a "professional" light meter with incident, reflected, and spot capabilities, that uses modern batteries, for about $15. That's hard to beat.

    I still have to modify the second one I got. Maybe I'll do that this weekend.
     
  7. macfred

    macfred Subscriber
    Ads Enabled

    Messages:
    1,778
    Joined:
    Nov 6, 2014
    Location:
    Germany
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    From my own experience I can recommend the Gossen Sixtomat Flash featuring LCD readout, incident and reflected light readings and flash measurement. It needs one AA battery; convenient size and easy to use.
    The Sixtomat Flash is available used for less than $ 100.
    The Sixtomat F2 (with simillar specs) is available new for about $ 200.
    Another nice (and even smaller) meter is the Gossen Digisix 2 with digital LCD readout, analog scales and reflective or incident modes. It takes a 3V CR2032 Lithium battery. Price is about $ 160.
     
  8. macfred

    macfred Subscriber
    Ads Enabled

    Messages:
    1,778
    Joined:
    Nov 6, 2014
    Location:
    Germany
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
  9. btaylor

    btaylor Subscriber
    Ads Enabled

    Messages:
    763
    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2010
    Location:
    Los Angeles
    Shooter:
    Large Format
    I would also give a thumbs up to the Gossen Luna Pro and Digisix. Oddly, even though I have smaller meters, I find myself using the Luna Pro most of the time. I spent a few dollars on it and had Gossen calibrate it and prvide a battery conversion-- I don't know if they still provide those services. The Digisix is one of the smallest meters I have ever used. It is easy to use and includes incident capabilities. Unfortunately mine suddenly started reading about 4 stops off, and it didn't seem to be worth fixing when new ones are $160 and I am happy with the old Luna Pro.

    saman13, that's a nifty video. I have a spare Luna Pro ($5!) I may try that trick.

    OP, congrats on the Rolleicord V. I've had one for decades, it's a wonderful camera capable of great images with less weight than the Rolleiflex.
     
  10. saman13

    saman13 Member

    Messages:
    365
    Joined:
    Mar 28, 2017
    Location:
    Sarasota, Florida
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    The guy that does "Fix Old Cameras" is pretty awesome. I've tried quite a few of his repairs and they've always worked out well for me. He even has videos on completely disassembling copal shutters. Haven't had to try that one yet but it's good to know it's there.
     
  11. Shoom

    Shoom Member

    Messages:
    28
    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2018
    Location:
    USA
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    I would second the love for Gossen, but get the Luna Pro SBC instead of the plain Luna Pro, as that one (the SBC) uses normal 9v batteries.

    Alternatively, Sunny-16 also works pretty well :D
     
  12. Pentode

    Pentode Subscriber
    Ads Enabled

    Messages:
    273
    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2017
    Location:
    Brooklyn, NY
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    My grandfather's Weston served me well for a while years ago and later, thanks to a flea market find, I used a Sekonic 162 "Auto Leader 3". Both are selenium meters (no batteries) and the Sekonic is very small and light and is pretty accurate. I've also used a Sekonic incident meter from time to time; a Studio Deluxe II which is also small, light, accurate and requires no battery. Of the three, the 162 is my favorite although it will never be as good in low light as a (battery dependant) CdS cell.

    If you're not shooting slide film you might want to consider using the cell phone app My Pocket Light Meter. It's free, it's configurable and it's actually quite accurate. Certainly well within the latitude of print film. I've tried three phone apps for light metering and all three work surprisingly well. It may not have the same tactile appeal as a hand-held meter, but it is very practical.
     
  13. Poisson Du Jour

    Poisson Du Jour Member
    Ads Enabled

    Messages:
    5,397
    Joined:
    Jul 1, 2008
    Location:
    Mount Cook Village NZ
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Groups:
    The L758D is a long-term keeper with virtually unlimited avenues to explore metering, be it spot/multispot or incident. It's applicability to street photography might be questionable in that it would excel in multispot/averaging but may not be so suitable for incident in great differences in illumination. Nor would it be the best choice for C41 or B&W work where so much latitude in either and both offsets the inherent accuracy of the meter in those situations. But with slide film and a skilled hand, nothing beats it.
     
  14. Sponsored Ad
  15. Fin

    Fin Subscriber
    Ads Enabled

    Messages:
    78
    Joined:
    Jan 25, 2017
    Location:
    Derbyshire UK
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Have a big +1 from me! The Luna Pro SBC (Or Profisix in Europe) is a fantastic meter, the Luna Pro F ( Lunasix F in Europe) is similar but without the electronic connections for different attachments and with slightly less sensitivity.

    Both are a bit larger than other meters, but both are very easy to use for outdoor and studio/indoor flash shots. And yes, they use a standard battery you can buy anywhere.
     
  16. guangong

    guangong Subscriber
    Ads Enabled

    Messages:
    1,018
    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2009
    Shooter:
    Medium Format
    For small, a Digisix. Bought mine new long ago specifically to use with Polaroid P/N 4x5 film because of thermometer and timer, it it is my usual carry around meter. Not only small but almost weightless.
    For really small, I use a calculator downloaded from Internet that is about the same dimensions as a STICK of chewing gum. Carry this in shirt pocket when carrying Minox III.
    Small, but without batteries, a Gossen Pilot, although not very practical in dimly lit bars, etc.
    Ranger 9 and LunaproF are very good but bulky.
    I can count the times in a year I use my spot meters. Mainly with very long lenses shooting unevenly lit subjects.
    Over many decades trying all kinds of meters I generally use a reflective meter and only find an incident meter necessary for shooting movies.
     
  17. RalphLambrecht

    RalphLambrecht Subscriber
    Ads Enabled

    Messages:
    10,580
    Joined:
    Sep 19, 2003
    Location:
    K,Germany
    Shooter:
    Medium Format
    the Gossen Lunar is a very good meter.Much smaller and almost as good is the Gossen DigiSix and less $ too.
     
  18. MattKing

    MattKing Subscriber
    Ads Enabled

    Messages:
    23,365
    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2005
    Location:
    Delta, BC, Canada
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Profisix and Lunasix F in Canada as well. I expect that those names apply everywhere in the world except the USA.
    There is actually a third version - known as the Luna-lux SBC in some parts of the world - that uses LEDs instead of the null needle.
    All three offer SBC cells instead of the CDS cells used in the older meters.
    Many of the non-electronic attachments that were originally made available for the older, CDS cell based Luna Pro meters will work with the newer SBC meters.
     
  19. Arthurwg

    Arthurwg Subscriber
    Ads Enabled

    Messages:
    175
    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2005
    Location:
    Taos NM
    Shooter:
    Medium Format

    macfred, what do you call that gizmo and where can I get one?
     
  20. Dennis-B

    Dennis-B Subscriber
    Ads Enabled

    Messages:
    153
    Joined:
    Jan 18, 2018
    Location:
    Southeast Michigan
    Shooter:
    35mm
    I'll third the recommendation on the Luna Pro SBC. They're available, and at reasonable prices. I like the "null" reading method used. You can also add that the silicon blue cell has advantages over the older CdS cells.

    I paid $30 for one at a local show, and it's in perfect condition.

    If you want to go the spot meter route, you can find a Soligor spot meter for fairly cheap money. There are also Pentax spot meters, a bit more expensive, but well worth it.

    While the older selenium cells don't "go bad", they need rest if continuously exposed to bright light. The better ones are good for more than 50 years, sometimes more.
     
  21. Eric Rose

    Eric Rose Subscriber
    Ads Enabled

    Messages:
    5,923
    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2002
    Location:
    On the round side
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    I'm still using this Zeiss Ikon meter I got from my father. Surprisingly accurate in normal light.

     
  22. ReginaldSMith

    ReginaldSMith Subscriber

    Messages:
    527
    Joined:
    May 14, 2018
    Location:
    Arizona
    Shooter:
    35mm
    For fun, I'd like to suggest THIS as the ultimate lightweight, easy to use, no batteries, dirt cheap "exposure meter." From Fred Parker.
    http://www.fredparker.com/ultexp1.htm

    For about a year I carried this in the form of a two-sided laminated card. It served me perfectly. I also have a Luna Pro analog 9V meter - because, well, why not. But, for 90% of the applications where I am shooting, the paper chart works every bit as accurately. Enjoy.
     
  23. saman13

    saman13 Member

    Messages:
    365
    Joined:
    Mar 28, 2017
    Location:
    Sarasota, Florida
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    This table is great to use on a Minolta 7s because you have a direct readout of the EV for a particular shutter speed and f stop on the barrel of the lens (not sure if others in the Minolta series have this too). I have a screenshot of it on my iPhone and use that as my exposure meter. A lot easier and cheaper than Wein cells.
     
  24. OP
    OP
    Pieter12

    Pieter12 Member
    Ads Enabled

    Messages:
    125
    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2017
    Location:
    Santa Monica, CA
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Thanks all. I found a Gossen Digisix at KEH that seems just right for my purposes. I considered using a phone app, but I find turning on the phone then launching the app just takes too much time for the kind of photography I'm doing.
     
  25. I use the Sekonic L308S because it has flash exposure measurements, incident and reflective readings and I can read EVs.
     
  26. ReginaldSMith

    ReginaldSMith Subscriber

    Messages:
    527
    Joined:
    May 14, 2018
    Location:
    Arizona
    Shooter:
    35mm
    My Konica III also has EV scale on the barrel. Nice.
     
  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies. If you have a Photrio account, please log in (and select 'stay logged in') to prevent recurrence of this notice.