Kodak Medalist II

Discussion in 'Medium Format Cameras and Accessories' started by Alentejo, Oct 22, 2018.

  1. BAC1967

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  2. guangong

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  3. Bud Hamblen

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    The US Navy bought a lot of Medalists during the Second World War. The instruction book for the camera is illustrated with pictures of a man wearing an enlisted man's dress blues.
     
  4. BAC1967

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    I wasn't aware there was a preferred lens for this model. Do you have more information on that?
     
  5. moto-uno

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    Having owned a Medalist 1 , I can say that the least of your concerns should be the lens ( assuming similar shape ). Peter
     
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  7. guangong

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    Because cameras were intended for use in the corrosive sea water environment the later versions were supplied with this more resistant protection for focusing. The Medalist II was an attempt to sell to the consumer market, which explains the addition of flash as well as discontinuing the anodized finish on lens. Any version of the Medalist, if not damaged, and whether coated or not ( use lens shade), or anodized or not is a great camera.
    My advice, download and print the manual. You must be aware of certain quirks that could send a Medalist n for repairs. After all,”there is a sensible way and the military way”.
    Also, I have found the case absolutely indispensable: 1) while rugged, it is a heavy chunk to accidentally bump into something and 2) the camera fits better and steadier in the hand.
     
  8. campy51

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    All this talk about this camera made me buy one. It's version 2 and shot my first roll on Sunday and here's a picture scanned. I'm not sure if I used ICE or not. There is also a problem with the film winder cocking the shutter. I get the click but it won't trip the shutter when I take the picture. I had to manually cock the shutter each time. Anyone here make that adjustment on theirs?
     

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  9. Bud Hamblen

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    My 1946 Medalist II was OK in that advancing the film would cock the shutter. A 70 year old camera may have developed some quirks that will need to be seen to. I've had mine serviced by Michael Zacks just because of its age. He did a good job, but he isn't cheap. zackscamerarepair.com A Medalist is a reasonable way to get a 6x9 negative.
     
  10. campy51

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    Can anyone here tell me if the Ednalite 6B hood will vignette on the Medalist II?
     
  11. alexvaras

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    I have Ednalite 6-P, dimensions 20mm deep (without thread) and 55mm diameter (inner side), no vignette.
     
  12. Mike Bates

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    I have a Medalist and two Medalist II cameras. They're awesome. I LIKE they use 620 film. Hand respooling is no problem for me. If they were 120 film cameras, they'd be much more in demand and prices would be much higher.

    I wish the primary viewfinder window was a bit bigger, but I love that it's separate from the rangefinder window and I can see them both by moving my eye slightly without moving the camera. The viewfinder is just glass and the rangefinder is just prisms and glass. No semi-silvered mirror to degrade with age. After the glass and prism are cleaned properly, the viewfinder and rangefinder are as bright and clear as they were when new. The viewfinder has some magnification and a fairly wide base, so it's dead-on accurate for the 100mm lens.

    I'm fairly certain the Medalist II focusing helicoil is anodized, just as the Medalist was. The only difference I can detect between the two is Kodak didn't dye the Medalist II helicoil black during the anodizing process. Anodizing aluminum produces a very hard surface and the Medalist II passes a simple scratch test. (I'm not going to gouge it with a sharp knife, but the pointed tip of my multimeter doesn't scratch it like it does regular aluminum plate.) The better test is conductance. Anodizing produces a non-conductive surface and my Medalist II helicoils are non-conductive. I prefer the look of the black anodizing, but you're not giving up durability there with a Medalist II.

    The lens coatings available when the Medalists were produced were very soft and unsuited for external surfaces. I think the internal glass/air surfaces were coated with the softer coating, but not the external front or rear lens surfaces. By the time the Medalist IIs were produced, Kodak had the more durable lens coating available and those lenses were "Luminized" and marked with the circled "L" on the front. Otherwise, the lenses are the same.

    Both models are easy to load... once you know how. They require a specific sequence of steps. It's pretty intuitive once you've done it a couple of times. They're not fragile cameras as long as you don't get a ham-fisted, "I know cameras" attitude without reading the manual once through.
     
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