Kentmere 100 w/Kodak HC-110

Discussion in 'Scanning and Scanners' started by RattyMouse, Jul 8, 2018.

  1. RattyMouse

    RattyMouse Member

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    I followed Ilford's tech data sheet and developed 3 rolls of Kentmere 100 in Kodak HC-110, dilution B. The results look OK on the negative (in my uneducated opinion; I've never printed a single image on paper, ever), but they scan horribly. Blown highlights up the ying yang.

    Can anyone offer up their developing formula for this film? I don't know if I'll ever buy it again because these results simply aren't working for me, but I'd like to know for future reference.
     
  2. 1kgcoffee

    1kgcoffee Member

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    No experience on my end with Kentmere 100. If it's anything like FP4 the highlights will be bright but graceful. Maybe you need to use filter (orange)?
     
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    RattyMouse

    RattyMouse Member

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    Now that you mention it, I did have issues when I tried FP4 the first time, very similar. I did not like that film so moved on.

    Damn, giving up Acros is so freakin' hard. I developed 2 rolls of Acros today from my backlog of film and they look just gorgeous.
     
  4. shutterfinger

    shutterfinger Subscriber

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    Looking at Kentmere spec sheet there is NO listing for HC110. There are only listings for Ilford developers. The Massive Development Chart shows HC110 dilution B as 5.5 minutes at 72°F.
    I suspect you used the times for the Ilford equivalent of HC110 which will not directly transfer to HC110.
    If I'm incorrect please link to the information you used as I read all the info on Ilford's web site.
     
  5. Lachlan Young

    Lachlan Young Member

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    What scanner are you using? Epson flatbeds and other consumer grade scanners can do horrid things to slightly dense highlights. Otherwise, what you are running up against is that Ilford uses a g-bar (average gradient/ contrast index) of 0.62, Fuji used 0.53-56 for Acros - this will make a considerable difference in highlight density. Start by taking perhaps 15-25% off Ilford's times & see where that gets you - you will probably need to adjust your EI. In other words, the EI 50 times may give you a better highlight density (generally closer to 0.5-0.52 g-bar) & make it easier to scan - it also makes much nicer negatives for darkroom printing in a lot of lighting situations.
     
    Last edited: Jul 8, 2018
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    RattyMouse

    RattyMouse Member

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    I scan with a Plustek OpticFilm 120.
     
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    RattyMouse

    RattyMouse Member

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    You are half right. I used the Kentmere time for HC-110 from the massive developing chart. I processed my Delta 100 roll after these Kentmere rolls and that was what I looked up from the data sheet. I remembered my source incorrectly.

    I did the 5.5 min at 72 F that you noted above and got the substandard results.
     
  8. Lachlan Young

    Lachlan Young Member

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    I'd suggest scanning as a positive, trying to ensure no clipping (possibly adding a small curve if you can to boost the darker sections of the negative - ie what will become highlights after inversion), then do the inversion in PS & set the BP & WP using curves & the clipping warnings, scanner software can be very inexplicable as to why they set a usually excessive percentage clipping on the WP... Hopefully this works ok on the plustek, it's pretty close to how I work with high-end scanners - make sure you scan in 16-bit. I've successfully scanned negs with proper highlight details that in the darkroom will only print on G-0 or below on MGWT - aka pretty damn dense highlights!
     
  9. shutterfinger

    shutterfinger Subscriber

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    A 5% change in processing time is equivalent of a 1/3 to 1/2 stop in exposure, depends on film/developer/temperature.
    A 25% change in processing time is push/pull processing.
    Changing development times is best done by converting the base time to seconds, calculate the percentage, add or subtract then convert back to minutes and seconds by dividing the result by 60 to determine the minutes then subtracting the even minute seconds from the result for the partial minute.
    A thermometer off 1°F will cause a 5% to 10% developing time error and a 2°F temperature error is about 15% to 20% development time error. Sometimes 3 thermometers are needed to find the bad thermometer.
    5.5 minutes decreased 15% is 4 minutes 40.5 seconds.
    Without seeing the negatives its hard to say how much reduction in time is needed. A 10% reduction in time at 70°F may be the answer.
    You can expose a few frames, clip them, and process at the different time/temperature and evaluate the results. Change one variable at a time to know what change has what result.
     
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    RattyMouse

    RattyMouse Member

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    Thank you. I'll keep your post for future reference when scanning.
     
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    RattyMouse

    RattyMouse Member

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    Thank you for this useful information. I think I still have a roll or two of Kentmere film and will use this as a guide for the next time developing.
     
  12. Lachlan Young

    Lachlan Young Member

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    Having had a quick check back through the data sheet, I'd be inclined to start at 5m 20c/68f at 1+31 for HC/ HC110, & then if temps are too high to hold to 5m or greater, something like 1+47 for 7.5m at 20c/68f might be a better start point.
     
  13. shutterfinger

    shutterfinger Subscriber

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