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rogein

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Hi all,

I've been playing around with the kallitype process and was wondering if someone could tell me:

- some say add ammonia to the fixer, others say no - what does the ammonia actually do?

- also some kallitypists use more concentrated solutions of ferric oxalate and silver nitrate - how does this affect the final print?

Thanks!
Roger...
 

Jorge

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Roger, ammonia speeds up the fixing process. I beleive it should not be added to the sodium thiosulfate as it bleaches the image too much.

Those who add more FO and Silver are of the opinion that if a little bit is good more is better. I have seen no evidence that mor FO or silver give you a better image with greater D max. IMO it is the paper and sizing you use rather than the amount.

I just started doing Kallytipes and I am having a lot of fun with it. I use it to proof negatives for pt/pd and it is a wonderful tool. Since I have the pd I tone them with it and I have to admit some look as good if not better than the pt prints.
Hope this helped.

Opps...I missed a not.....sorry.
 
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rogein

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Sep 20, 2002
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North York,
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</span><table border='0' align='center' width='95%' cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td>QUOTE (Jorge @ Jan 24 2003, 03:01 PM)</td></tr><tr><td id='QUOTE'>I just started doing Kallytipes and I am having a lot of fun with it. I use it to proof negatives for pt/pd and it is a wonderful tool. Since I have the pd I tone them with it and I have to admit some look as good if not better than the pt prints.</td></tr></table><span class='postcolor'>
Thanks Jorge for the info! Must be a coincidence as I also began using the process as a 'proof' for pt/pd but am finding I like the qualtiy of the kallitypes themselves.

One question - I've noticed that when I hold up a print to the light I can see 'dark spots' scattered through out the paper (platine). These spots look more semi transparent rather than as a solid brown or black. Oddly enough a vandyke or argyrotype printed on platine does not have this problem - only kallitype.
I'm using amm.citrate as the developer. I clear for 2 min in citric acid, fix for 2 min in sod.thios., and hypoclear for another 2 min in sod.sulfite (with 2 min washes between steps), then wash for 30min. Any idea what I may be seeing 'in' the paper?

Cheers,
Roger...
 

Jorge

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Roger, like you I am not an expert in this. So I am speculating here and bear in mind my newness with the process. I would think that the brown spots are ferrous metal left over and that you need to fix just a tiny bit more, since this only happens to you with kallitypes and the only difference is the need to fix. You might also want to try developing a little longer, remember the developing time is essential for kallitypes as it dissolves all the ferrous metal left over. If I were you I would try developing a little longer first, if that does not work then try the fix for a little longer. I think you will see better results with PO, faster speed and better highlights IMO.

BTW I missed a not in my previous message, it should be do not add ammonium to the thiosulfate as it bleaches the print
 
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