Kallitype - How long can I let dry?

Grain rain

A
Grain rain

  • 0
  • 1
  • 99
Dancer In Motion

A
Dancer In Motion

  • 4
  • 1
  • 114
Birds eye view

A
Birds eye view

  • 2
  • 2
  • 131
EmptyName 7.jpg

A
EmptyName 7.jpg

  • 10
  • 8
  • 338

Recent Classifieds

Forum statistics

Threads
189,787
Messages
2,646,818
Members
97,347
Latest member
A Modest Mouse
Recent bookmarks
0

MatthewDunn

Member
Joined
Jul 3, 2013
Messages
198
Location
Ipswich, Mass
Format
Large Format
Is there any adverse effect to allowing a Kallitype to naturally air dry for an hour or so before exposing? My (likely flawed) understanding of other processes, such as Ziatype, seem to indicate that your image may take on a warmer/brown-er tone when not used immediately. I was wondering whether Kallitypes had similar requirements.
 
Joined
Nov 11, 2004
Messages
27
Location
Saint-Etienne, France
Format
Hybrid
No. Once coated, it should be allowed to dry completely but it doesn’t require exposure immediately. I’ve never done the Ziatype process but my understanding is that moisture content is a determining factor of its appearance. This is much less the case with kallitypes and argyrotypes. Mike Ware does suggest that humidity can be utilized in the argyrotype, but nothing like the Ziatype.
 

Tel

Subscriber
Joined
May 9, 2011
Messages
838
Location
New Jersey
Format
Multi Format
+1: In fact, it's important to dry the paper thoroughly. The first time I tried printing Kallitypes, I damaged a negative by pressing it against too-wet paper.
 
OP
OP
MatthewDunn

MatthewDunn

Member
Joined
Jul 3, 2013
Messages
198
Location
Ipswich, Mass
Format
Large Format
Awesome. Thanks for this. Very helpful.
 

DMJ

Member
Joined
Nov 20, 2020
Messages
268
Location
Los Angeles
Format
Multi Format
This is a good question. I checked my books and some say paper should be exposed within a few hours. I always let my paper dry for an hour in a cabinet but I live in a very dry location.
I'm quoting from one of the books: "Apply the emulsion in a darkened room to paper or cloth at 100F by coating with...Printing should be carried out immediately because the sensitized coating will begin to deteriorate within 1 day"

It should be easy to find out with a simple experiment.
 

Tel

Subscriber
Joined
May 9, 2011
Messages
838
Location
New Jersey
Format
Multi Format
I judge it by felling the edge of the coated area; I expect it's usually between 30 minutes and 45, depending on the relative humidity. I Like the quote from the book: "Printing should be carried out immediately because the sensitized coating will begin to deteriorate within 1 day". So, anywhere between now and a day later leaves a lot of room for adjustment.
 
OP
OP
MatthewDunn

MatthewDunn

Member
Joined
Jul 3, 2013
Messages
198
Location
Ipswich, Mass
Format
Large Format
I let the freshly coated paper sit to air dry for 30 minutes before exposing a negative to it. Have been doing it this way for many years.

After trying a few Kallitypes, the half-hour to hour recommendation seems right on for my RH (50-60%, US New England basement). I am not sure if I will go back to trying Ziatypes. I initially bought the kit because, notwithstanding the cost, I thought they might be easier than Kallitypes, but my limited experience thus far has been that dealing with Kallitypes has been easier. I only work with in-camera negatives (not a religious issue, just don't know anything about digital) so ruining a negative to a still wet Ziatype (which has happened) is not something I look forward to. Perhaps, of course, I was just too hasty and Ziatypes have more drying tolerance than I was giving it credit for...
 

Andrew O'Neill

Moderator
Joined
Jan 16, 2004
Messages
10,143
Location
Coquitlam,BC Canada
Format
Multi Format
After trying a few Kallitypes, the half-hour to hour recommendation seems right on for my RH (50-60%, US New England basement). I am not sure if I will go back to trying Ziatypes. I initially bought the kit because, notwithstanding the cost, I thought they might be easier than Kallitypes, but my limited experience thus far has been that dealing with Kallitypes has been easier. I only work with in-camera negatives (not a religious issue, just don't know anything about digital) so ruining a negative to a still wet Ziatype (which has happened) is not something I look forward to. Perhaps, of course, I was just too hasty and Ziatypes have more drying tolerance than I was giving it credit for...

I tried Ziatype once, and never again. Too fussy. I find the traditional Kallitype easier to work with. The challenge, however, is consistency from print to print. I find I can be more consistent with sodium citrate developer, followed by gold toning, and sodium acetate developed and dilute selenium toning. Both give a different look.
 

Tel

Subscriber
Joined
May 9, 2011
Messages
838
Location
New Jersey
Format
Multi Format
I like working with Kallitypes. They're not too daunting chemistry-wise and I really love the results. And there's something really satisfying about owning the whole process from coating the paper to fixing the print. A really nice balance between artisanal and technical processes.
 
OP
OP
MatthewDunn

MatthewDunn

Member
Joined
Jul 3, 2013
Messages
198
Location
Ipswich, Mass
Format
Large Format
I like working with Kallitypes. They're not too daunting chemistry-wise and I really love the results. And there's something really satisfying about owning the whole process from coating the paper to fixing the print. A really nice balance between artisanal and technical processes.

100% with you. In short time, I have become super addicted.
 
OP
OP
MatthewDunn

MatthewDunn

Member
Joined
Jul 3, 2013
Messages
198
Location
Ipswich, Mass
Format
Large Format
I commonly let my kallitype coatings dry overnight with no problems,

Oh, ok, excellent to know! And I would be remiss if I didn't tell you that your excellent YT vids were a large motivating factor in giving these a try!
 
Photrio.com contains affiliate links to products. We may receive a commission for purchases made through these links.
To read our full affiliate disclosure statement please click Here.

PHOTRIO PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Ilford ADOX Freestyle Photographic Stearman Press Weldon Color Lab Blue Moon Camera & Machine
Top Bottom