Individual Modus Operandi

Discussion in 'Ethics and Philosophy' started by Ed Sukach, May 3, 2004.

  1. rbarker

    rbarker Member

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    I have two separate MOs. One for when I'm trying to understand, interpret, and bring to film (life) someone else's idea (i.e. a commercial assignment where the AD is king [or, queen]), and a different one for my own photography. The latter MO is loose and adaptive, responding to both my mood and my surroundings. While I tend to be an obsessive planner, I also try to pay attention to whatever alternatives might come along.
     
  2. Eric Rose

    Eric Rose Subscriber
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    Ed are you looking for the "way we work" which to me is a mechanical thing, or the "why we work" which can be more of a Maslow type of analysis, or the "why do we do" which is more of a philosophical self revealing comment on our photography?
     
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    Ed Sukach

    Ed Sukach Member

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    Yes.
     
  4. Eric Rose

    Eric Rose Subscriber
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    common Ed, that's a little broad don't ya think? Books have been written to explain lesser things.

    I'll answer the "why do we do". I try to transmit my views/values and attitudes to viewers of my photography by interpretating my surroundings thru the mechanical process of photography.
     
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    Ed Sukach

    Ed Sukach Member

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    Not really. I claim to be "holistic". I do not want to, nor do I think it is a "good" thing to fragmentize oneself into subordinate parts. I want to learn abut the how, why, and mechanics - all of it - and, even more important - the way it all works together. Therefore - "Yes".

    P. S. ... "common"??? Well OK, if it is to imply "universal". It surely was not meant to be "inferior" to some elite class - was it?
     
  6. MurrayMinchin

    MurrayMinchin Membership Council Council

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    I photograph that which amazes me.

    Murray
     
  7. eagleowl

    eagleowl Member

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    my thoughts

    Basically,I photograph anyhting which "catches my eye" for some reason-whether it's because I think it's beautiful,dramatic,humorous,or whatever.
    Occasionally,I photograph something simply to practice.

    As for the definiton of art,my other hobbies include calligraphy,watercolour and acrylic painting.
    Do I analyse what I'm doing and think about the technical aspects?
    Of course not-I don't have anywhere near enough time to waste any doing that!
    Ultimately,art is whatever you think it is-or to put it another way:"beauty is in the eye of the beholder".
     
  8. Jim Chinn

    Jim Chinn Member

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    The best way to describe most of what I shoot that ends up as prints is due to the planned accident approach. that simply means that I usually discover some real gold on the way to or from what I originally planned to shoot or maybe within a few feet of the location or object. Serendipity plays a big part for me.
     
  9. Claire Senft

    Claire Senft Member

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    Art, Smart and Fart

    I feel the need to take a make the best crafted photos that I can from start to finish. I like working in 35mm. I use the most stable tripod, camera and lenses thatr I was able to find. I spend a great deal of effort to find the best camera position. I use BTZS techniques to produce the best negative I am able. Then I print it as well as I am able.

    Is it art? Why should I care...it is a photograph that pleases me?
     
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    Ed Sukach

    Ed Sukach Member

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    Probably the best place to post this ...

    Norm La Coe, at [ http://unblinkingeye.com ] has a *VERY* thought provoking article, titled: "Part Two: Emotion in Photographs: The Landscape Nude - Show me Who you Are."

    I just re-read this for about the fifteenth time. This one I will integrate into my "being".

    Comments?
     
  11. slackercrurster

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    Good subject!

    I hope more photogs join in to share the inner working's of their mind. I'm not going into technique. I've shred about my technique on various threads.

    Here is my M.O., more or less, from an old Bio.

    Artist’s statement:

    I’m not much for artist’s statements. I feel the photo should be able to stand on its own and not need a chapter of esoteric bullshit to justify it. Neither am I one to write or hire authors to write long justifications and explanation for my books. My photo illustrated books are well known for their economy of text. But everyone is not visually oriented and the intellectuals like to see some words, so let me give it a go.

    If I had to sum up my interest in photography…it must stem from a liking to being able to ‘freeze time.’ Cartier-Bresson described how many a street photographer feels when at large…”I prowled the streets all day, feeling very sprung-up and ready to pounce, determined to ‘trap’ life – to preserve life in the act of living.”

    And that pretty much describes me to a proverbial ‘T.’ As an example, when working the subway in NYC I generally hop on the first or last car and at every stop I move to the next car to have a fresh look at the world with the hope of finding something interesting to document.

    Now, combine that frantic need to see and record with a dose of Elliott Erwitt…”I just take pictures and hope something comes out of it.”

    Erwitt’s quote reminds me that luck is a big factor in getting that iconic shot and to try and keep a big ego in check. Street photographers are not cut from the same cloth as studio photographers or sunset specialists. With my type of work, having a big ego and being a little off your rocker helps get the shot when the need to shove your camera in some strangers face at 2 AM arises. To do good street photography, societal conventions can not always be maintained.

    Photography of all genres trains practitioners to concentrate their vision and see things the average person may overlook. Before I was a photographer, I would seldom look at the small details or focus on a subject for any length of time.

    Now I notice the beauty of a weathered wall. I see potential for a photo in a dusty window screen. In short, photographers are always looking. We look at everything, visualizing play of light, composition, shapes, color, patterns and especially in my case people. For the social documentarian our work is based on humanity…people are our landscape!

    There is something that transforms the snapshot into a photograph. A spark of alchemy the photographer uses that turns the ordinary photo into something that is worthy of a second look. That elusive transformation is what I set out to capture in my photography.

    In a 1979 interview entitled Inside New York’s Art World, artist Louise Nevelson said: “I think that when someone is willing to live and die for something…that means it is in the genes.” That pretty much sums up the sacrifices that many an artist will go through in order to do their art – they are willing to live and die for their art. Whether painter, draftsman, photographer, writer, musician, sculptor, actor or poet, artists use their art as a way to see, interpret and make sense of their world.

    If you’re dedicated to your art and freezing time is in your blood, you MUST produce and keep producing, whether you have an outlet or not to make $…or even have any practical use for your output. Irrespective of recognition, fame and riches, we all have one thing in common…as long as we can keep pressing the button and freeze time, we feel the better for it.

    <><><><>
    'Crazy' 1975 L.A. - Hassy SWC



    crazy-lr-L.A.-1975-daniel-d-teoli-jr.jpg


     
    Last edited: Dec 23, 2018
  12. slackercrurster

    slackercrurster Member
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    Now here is something from HCB...

    cartier-bresson-on-street-photography.jpg
     
  13. jtk

    jtk Subscriber
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    My post- professional "MO" usually proceeds from guesses about location, light, concept, or review of my own earlier work. It's never complicated and never justifies for me, or for anybody else, more than a few very short paragraphs. Like these.

    In my studio photo decade I was blessed by clients who paid well and wanted the kinds of things I accomplished. They liked my graphic design skills, my lighting. My reliability had become well known. They liked the fact that I understood lithography. They let me do what I wanted/needed to do because we were on the same page. Sometimes I wanted/needed to do something they hadn't expected but that always made us both happy.

    I'm personally reflective, but that has more to do with relationships and my own history than about photography. Many non-reflective people lead wonderful lives and do as much for others as I do. Many of them do wonderful photography.

    Philosophic quote: "Keep your mouth closed, your bowels open, and believe in Jesus. " Chet Helms
    http://lostlivedead.blogspot.com/2010/01/september-6-7-1969-family-dog-at-great.html
     
    Last edited: Dec 24, 2018
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