I have an unopend box of Ektalure 11x14....

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by Matt5791, Feb 13, 2009.

  1. Matt5791

    Matt5791 Member

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    I've hoarding this one box of 50 sheets for a couple of years since buying it from a photographer having a clear out in London. I haven't dared cut the tape and open it.....I've just kept it, "my precious".........

    I've never used this paper before, but have heard great things - 1930's Holywood portraits is one of them. Creamy skin tones is another. It all sounds wonderful.

    So, what I want to know is....from those with experience, what sort of subject matter should I save, or more importantly, shoot specifically for this paper?...What are its characteristics?

    Many thanks,
    Matt
     
  2. rthomas

    rthomas Member

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    I used to buy this paper in 11x14 size for printing large-format negatives when I was in a studio class. It was great for a series of self portraits I did. I can't scan any examples for you, they're in storage. I miss it, it's a great paper.
     
  3. Mike Wilde

    Mike Wilde Member

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    iI's got a creamy white base, and can give wonderful warm tones when developer in a warm tone developer, ala ansco 130 with a bit more than normal of bromide.

    It also can tone in an actual toner rather nicely also. It is susceptible to staining, so wash well before toning.

    I would hold onto it for loving softish resolution portraits of older individuals.

    It is a single grade, so make sure that the neg you use is suited to that grade, or be prepared to dodge and burn like mad, or use a contrast reducing unsharp mask technique to get a higher contrast neg to print easily on this paper.

    I used the last of my stash last year, and scour every camera fair and camera store old stocks I get to for more of the stuff.
     
  4. pgomena

    pgomena Member

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    It is wonderful paper and it has some special characteristics in regard to suitable negatives and processing. It has a short tonal range but very good highlight separation. (It was intended for studio portraiture, so its forte is skin tones.) You need a negative with good shadow detail and a smidgeon of extra development, say a minute over your normal time. It performs best in a warm tone developer and will give a wonderful rich cool-ish chocolate-brown in selenium toner. Be sure to give it full development, at least 2 minutes, and a full 5-minute fix. It requires the relatively long fix to clear properly. As Mike Wilde said above, wash it thoroughly before toning. Enjoy your paper, I envy you -- I have only a half-full box of 8x10 that is waiting for the right portrait.

    Peter Gomena
     
  5. Rich Ullsmith

    Rich Ullsmith Member

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    Warm tone developer or even better, or even better I think is an amidol developer. I use Michael and Paula's formula for enlarging (michaelandpaula.com). You have enough Ektalure there to justify getting the constituents for such a developer together.

    I don't know if you lith, but this paper is a great one for it. Also redevelops in lith after bleaching.

    There's more of this paper out there, but I have not seen any 11X14 or 16X20 in a few years. Nice find.
     
  6. smieglitz

    smieglitz Member

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    Ektalure was my favorite paper. The cream base and "G" surface were ideal for hand-coloring portraits. I would selenium-tone it to boost the contrast slightly and shift the color so the shadows would have a nice purplish selenium tone. That coordinated the underlying color for the application of oils.

    The loss of Ektalure is what finally pushed me into wetplate photography and independence from the photographic manufacturers.

    Joe
     
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    Matt5791

    Matt5791 Member

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    Thanks for the hints and tips everyone.

    And I hadn't even gone there for it - I had bought a load of darkroom gear on ebay and when I went to pick it up she said I could have all of her paper for a bit extra (she was obviously packing in analog all together)

    I had never even heard of Ektalure until she drew my attention to it in the bundle saying how great it was and how it had been kept frozen.

    The box has the up to date Kodak branding so I guess it is one of the last boxes.

    There was an un opened box of Agfa MCC 12x16 too, which I have yet to crack into.

    Matt