Help with camera choice to get back into photography

Discussion in '35mm Cameras and Accessories' started by Jheath0015, Jan 26, 2018.

  1. Arklatexian

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    Question? Is there a photo shop near you in Tennessee? That is another fact of photography that has also changed in the last 15 years. Most small to medium sized cities no longer have camera stores. You might find one in Memphis or perhaps Nashville. If it is like where I live (200,000+ population), there are none. Use the OM10 and forget the P&S. You will have a fine camera and great lenses and if it needs servicing, which it may not, there are, I am sure, places you can send it. Developing and printing B&W film has not really changed since your school days so forget scanning. Darkroom printing is not that difficult and as mentioned earlier, can be learned from a book. You have access to a good camera, fine lenses and it just isn't that difficult to make fine photographs with that rig..........Don't let your imagination overule your common sense.........Regards!
     
  2. Ko.Fe.

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    OM-10 is great and small camera by same time. Not heavy, nor bulky and does the same as more glorified SLRs do.
    If you have 28 and 50mm you are all set.
     
  3. Mick Fagan

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  4. Ces1um

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    Seems a very reasonable conclusion. Good luck and enjoy!
     
  5. Poisson Du Jour

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    The Olympus OM10 with a manual adaptor was my first 'real' camera after my Dad took grave offence at me buying a Zenit E camera!
    Gramps demanded "that Soviet crap!" be returned to the store, and he and I would find me a proper, real camera. Next day, a gleaming OM10 and Zuiko 28mm lens tucked under my arm, a career photographer was born! Very long story short, I worked may way through the entire OM system, then Nikon and finally Canon (still used). I also had several point-and-shoots: An Olympus XA (still use one — one of many owned over the decades), a Konica Big Mini and an Olympus Miu.

    A cautionary note about the age of these OM cameras. If they have not been used for years there is a very real risk of something not working — anything from shutters to shutter speeds to apertures and meters, and faults are common. Your text suggests you are aware of this possibility and are prepared for it. All good then. I have a friend with an otherwise mint condition OM1n and it fires on a whim, rather than on demand. The Nikon 35AF would be my choice, although many others are out there; just the age that is the big question. I had at one time a simple Ricoh 35AF -- 1983 I think, which I tucked into my back pocket on my weekend gentlemen's coffee rides from Melbourne to Bendigo and back — a leisurely 362km return ride.
     
    Last edited: Jan 27, 2018
  6. MattKing

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    Condition, condition, condition!
    If the OM lenses are in good condition, you need to use them with an OM body. If in good working condition, the OM 10 is a good choice.
    If you want simplicity of use, good technique with a point and shoot will give you excellent results.
    This is with an Olympus Trip 35. I paid $2.14 for it, so that is the title:

    upload_2018-1-27_18-22-58.png
     
  7. OP
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    Jheath0015

    Jheath0015 Member

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    I really looked at the camera this morning and discovered that the 50mm lens has a small scratch. The bigger one is perfectly fine. Are Lens’s hard to repair? Makes me wonder if the camera will need it too. Not that I wouldn’t repair anything that needed it. From the way the body just looks it only needs a good cleaning. How much could this potentially cost me? Just out of curiosity of course. Hopefully not too much though.
     
  8. Theo Sulphate

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    A scratch on the front element will have almost NO effect on the image aside from minor contrast loss. A scratch or chip in the front element glass would have to be large and heinous before it seriously affected image quality. I say don't worry about it.

    Chances are your OM camera needs only new light seals and a "CLA" (clean, lubricate, adjust). I'd never hand it over to a repair tech I didn't know personality or had no previous experience with and say "fix any problems it has", because they'll likely find things to fix that don't need it.

    When was the camera last used? It may need nothing.
     
  9. Chan Tran

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    To the OP! Since you seem to prefer a P&S I would suggest you go to the dark side and get a D***** camera. $20 to $50 would buy you a good used P&S and lower cost making prints.
     
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    Jheath0015

    Jheath0015 Member

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    It’s not that I prefer point and shoot. It’s just that’s all I’ve used. I’ve always wanted and SLR just have been afraid with all the manual controls so this way it gives me something I’ve always wanted without having to pay for it (except the cost of repairs and cleaning).
     
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    Jheath0015

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    Also, I don’t know anyone personally that cleans or repairs Camera’s. Not many around to be honest. Couple in Nashville, clarksville, and one in Paducah close to my parents. Probably gonna go with the latter but only because that’s where I’m from.
     
  12. Theo Sulphate

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    KEH, a good source for buying used cameras, also repairs cameras and would probably do as good a CLA as anyone.

    They're in Atlanta.

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  13. mshchem

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    Get a point and shoot. Then buy a Nikon F5 and a 50 1.4. Once you use a PROFESSIONAL auto focus SLR, well it will change you :heart:. The OM-10 isn't an Olympic Olympus. You need to buy a Paterson tank and some HC-110 and develop and scan yourself. Make contact prints etc.

    If you have an OM-10 odds are that the lenses aren't top of the line Zuiko Olympus brand. If you have 500 bucks to spend you can buy a Nikon or Canon pro 35mm camera. Learn how to develop your own film.
     
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  15. Chan Tran

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    In this case the OM-10 is fine. You can use that it's a bit less convenient when you want to set exposure the way you want because it's aperture priority only and no manual mode but you can trick it to set any settings you want.
    You might want to buy another camera or cameras after a while but that for later.
     
  16. Craig75

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    Load up what you have in the house and just shoot it. Dont worry about a small scratch or servicing gear - just run some film through it and see what you get

    On an SLR there are only 4 controls - aperture, shutter speed, film speed, and focus. Just shoot at film's box speed and now there are only 3 controls. Im sure you can focus so now there are only 2 controls. Just leave the aperture at f8 for the moment and now there is only one control - the shutter. Slower shutter = more light = brighter picture - faster shutter = less light = darker picture and away you go.
     
  17. wyofilm

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    Craig75 is right! Just go use the camera you have the way he said to. You will have fun; ALL of your manual misgivings will go away with the first roll. By the second roll, you will be wondering what all the fuss was about.

    Film is super forgiving to overexposure. So, I would start off with a roll of 400 speed film. This will suit you fine from overcast to sunny.

    To be honest, I would have prints made with the first rolls you shoot. A little spendy, but in the early going you don't have to think about processing or scanning. Have fun!
     
  18. mshchem

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    Absolutely true with negative film. One bit of caution. If you Overexpose up to 4 stops and underexpose up to 2 stops, there's a good chance the prints you get back will be auto corrected to produce an acceptable print. They won't look the same on close inspection especially if you are changing the f-stops. Both former postings are correct color negative film has at least 6 stops of wiggle room. This is why disposable cameras give acceptable prints.

    When you get good at determining the correct exposure, when you lay your negatives on a light box they should have the same relative densities. Don't forget to look at the negatives. An old Kodak photoguide will give you exposures recommended for outdoors. These guides are foolproof.
     
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    Jheath0015

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    Just discovered my wife hasn’t used the camera in roughly 15 years so chances are I will have to get it looked at to some degree. Thank you guys for all your help and advice. I truly appreciate it. I will be taking her out and shooting soon. I’ll post some of my prints so be on the lookout. Any critiquing would be appreciated as well.
     
  20. E. von Hoegh

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    Having the camera checked over is by far the best approach. Trying to learn on equipment that is not 100% functional will be incredibly frustrating, about as productive as pushing rope.
     
  21. OP
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    Jheath0015

    Jheath0015 Member

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    Also have one more question. The camera has the manual adapter already attached. Should I pop it off or set it to one setting before I start shooting? Since I don’t wanna learn too many controls at once. Once I get the hang of things then I can start messing with it. I believe it only changes shutter speed anyways.
     
  22. Theo Sulphate

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    15 years... Yes, it's a CLA candidate. But once that's done, you'll have something you can rely on for many years. You'll know its condition.

    I hope the battery was removed prior to storage.
     
  23. E. von Hoegh

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    Do you have the instructions for the camera? If not, get them and study them, with the camera in front of you, before you put film in the camera. I cannot emphasise this enough - study the instructions.
     
  24. OP
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    Jheath0015

    Jheath0015 Member

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    Yeah she took the batteries out. She’s a smart woman. I have everything that came with it. Not sure about the adaptor instructions though which is why I asked about if I should use a specific shutter speed for now.
     
  25. E. von Hoegh

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    If you select a shutter speed via the adapter, the camera will be in manual mode, you will need to set the exposure. This is, or should be, covered in the instructions. If not covered, get on google and find instructions for the adapter.
     
  26. I've owned a few OM-10s. They're decent enough cameras, although I've never much cared for them -- mostly because they lack shutter speed control. But you can buy a manual shutter speed adapter for the OM-10, which I consider to be a necessity. Reason why is that I feel most strongly that anyone who is at all serious about photography should learn the principles behind it -- foremost being the "trinity" of shutter speed, aperture, and film ISO and how they interact with each other. With the manual shutter speed adapter for an OM-10, this relationship can be explored.

    Also, keep in mind that, since you already own (or at least your sister does) a collection of Oly glass, you can always add to the stable of Oly cameras. A decent OM-1 or OM-2 can be a welcome edition, and either can usually be found for quite a reasonable price at sites like eBay.

    I strongly encourage you to spend some time with SLRs that require you think about exposure, as opposed to P&S cameras that don't. But if you still want a P&S camera, there are so many to choose from, many of which are actually excellent picture takers, so it becomes difficult to suggest a particular model. I can only make recommendations based on my own experiences. I've used and can recommend the Canon AF35ML (aka "Super Sure Shot"), the Canon Sure Shot Classic 120, the Canon QL17 GIII (not really a P&S but more of a true rangefinder with limited auto functions), the clamshell Oly Stylus cameras (there have been many different models and I don't recall which model it was that I had), the Oly XA (again, more of a rangefinder than a P&S), and the Minolta Hi-Matic AF2 (from what I understand, all the Hi-Matics are very useful cameras, however).

    Whichever route you choose, good shooting, and may all your images be keep-worthy.
     
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