Flash for an RB67???

Discussion in 'Medium Format Cameras and Accessories' started by stradibarrius, Feb 27, 2009.

  1. stradibarrius

    stradibarrius Member

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    What would be a good flash unit to use with my RB67? I have a Nikon SB600 but It does not have an old style sync port.
     
  2. archphoto

    archphoto Member

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    Basicly you can use every flash with your RB. Even your Nikon SB600 ! Just get yourself an adapter that filts on the bottom of your flash and has a PC connection. Get a PC to PC lead aswell and you are ready.
    Ask your local camera store, they will know what I mean.

    Peter
     
  3. fschifano

    fschifano Member

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    ...and the SB600 can be used in "auto" mode. It uses the same sort of sensor as a plain old fashioned Vivitar 285HV.
     
  4. mgb74

    mgb74 Subscriber

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  5. Chan Tran

    Chan Tran Member

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    Unlike the SB-800 and SB-900, the SB-600 doesn't have such an auto mode. Only TTL and Manual.
     
  6. k_jupiter

    k_jupiter Member

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    To be real honest... get a flash unit with the largest guide number you can find. When you are using the rb, you will be a couple of aperture numbers south of what your 35mm equipment uses.

    One of the potato masher types or a huge Vivitar or Sunpak. Get the sync cable, a good bracket for the flash and grip and you are good to go.

    tim in san jose
     
  7. Graham_Martin

    Graham_Martin Member

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    I just purchased a used Metz 45 CL-4, and I really like the way the large handle serves as ready made flash bracket. If you have the rotating back then you needn't worry about the Metz not being able to rotate.
     
  8. David Brown

    David Brown Member

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    I must be missing something. What does this mean? Are you just talking about how much slower the rb lenses are?
     
  9. k_jupiter

    k_jupiter Member

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    Actually, I meant north.

    To get the same depth of field using the rb, you need to be an aperture stop or so slower compared with a 35mm camera and equivalent lens.

    tim in san jose
     
  10. Steve Smith

    Steve Smith Member

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    I use my Vivitar 285 with mine. Sitting on top of the left hand grip.



    Stevbe.
     
  11. k_jupiter

    k_jupiter Member

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    Steve,

    I have both a 285 and Sunpak 444. Nice units but I feel constrained by the power. I use them for rather short photo experiences.

    tim in san jose
     
  12. Steve Smith

    Steve Smith Member

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    I have only used the 285 for fill flash outside (probably around f8).

    It's the same one my father used to use for weddings in the 1980s and 1990's.

    It certainly had enough power for him. In fact he said that at the time he got it, it was the only flash that actually put out the power it's manufacturers guide number said it would. The rest seemed a bit optimistic.

    I agree that if you were using it as a main flash at f11 or slower, it would probably need a bit of help.



    Steve.
     
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    stradibarrius

    stradibarrius Member

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    Hanimex TZ 36

    Is the Hanimex TZ 36 flash unit a good unit? I am not familiar with them. Would it be a good match for my RB67?
     
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  15. Ralph Javins

    Ralph Javins Member

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    Good morning;

    Others have indeed hit the main points: Get something big. A Guide Number of around 200 will probably be where you will feel comfortable in the work you are likely to do. Vivitar, Sunpak, Metz, and even some of the old Honeywell Strobonars would work in that realm. Well, I do agree that the Strobonars did not have any kind of an "Auto" mode, but they did put out some light. If you need really fast recycling times, look into one that can accept a 510 VDC battery pack, in either a normal LeClanche cell type or a rechargeable Nickel-Cadmium type. When indoors, you will be surprised at how nicely you can get a well exposed photograph with a properly adjusted higher power strobe. Bouncing is good for you.
     
  16. mgb74

    mgb74 Subscriber

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    Some of the older "potato masher" style Strobonars did have a simple auto mode, for example the 660. No TTL capability though.

    As to what might be best with the RB, I still gravitate toward the 283 or 285 for shoemount (with less power), and the older Metz units (getting fairly cheap as the flash voltage is way to high for digital SLRs) for handlemount. The Sunpak 611 can often be had very cheap but is (I think) manual only. The Sunpak 544 is another good choice, though perhaps not as rugged as the Metz or Sunpack 6xx series.
     
  17. John Koehrer

    John Koehrer Subscriber

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    283/285 were as powerful as the old Strobonars within fractions of an f stop. Sunpak 544 or 611 may have given an additional stop but I doubt it.
    Metz units I think are more gutsy than 283/5's by a little bit too.
    The Vivitar units had several pretty neat accessories. The VP-1 was a variable resistor that alloowed you to dial down the power. The extension cord for the VP-1 or auto sensor. Bounce card & Fresnel lens set. If you look around you can still find some of the metal accessory shoes that replace the hot shoe with a more durable part.
    They're also relatively inexpensive, pretty durable & compact(283).
     
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    stradibarrius

    stradibarrius Member

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    Is anyone familiar with the Hanimex TZ36? What is the guide number?
     
  19. Q.G.

    Q.G. Inactive

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    36, in meters.
     
  20. John Koehrer

    John Koehrer Subscriber

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    Guide numbers change with the film.
    To get a guide number for an ISO 100 film,
    Set the ISO dial for 100 and manual. Look at the 10 foot mark on the scale and it gives you an f number.
    Multiply the f number by the number of feet and thats your guide number.(f11X10ft=110) In the US.
     
  21. fschifano

    fschifano Member

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    Your numbers are right, but unfortunately the guide numbers given for many flash units are optimistic. It's not uncommon that you'd need to allow an extra stop over the recommended settings. If you want f/11, set the flash for f/16 and the lens to f/11. For negative films, this isn't a problem even if it does over expose a bit. It gives you a bit of a cushion. For transparency films, it might be too much, so be careful there and see. Latitude is slim, so a little bit of error one way or the other is very noticeable.
     
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    stradibarrius

    stradibarrius Member

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    I have been searching on line for info on the Hanimex TZ36. I have found one for sale in very good condition and am wondering if this would be a good match for the RB67. It's on the auction site so I haven't seen it. I have on many occasions bought "white elephants" for very good prices!
     
  23. Q.G.

    Q.G. Inactive

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    It is custom, 'norm', to specify guide numbers for ISO 100.


    The Hanimex may indeed be a white elephant.
    I would look for one of the many (and cheap) Metz 45 series units. The basic 45 CT-1 will do very well for your RB.
    And they are really dirt cheap (the last one i bought, used, set me back (approx.) US$ 15).
     
  24. John Koehrer

    John Koehrer Subscriber

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    custom and norm yes, But they still change with the film.
    If the user wants to know what the GN is with his ISO 800film the GN for ISO100 doesn't help him
     
  25. John Koehrer

    John Koehrer Subscriber

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    custom and norm yes, But they still change with the film.
    If the user wants to know what the GN is with his ISO 800film the GN for ISO100 doesn't help him.
    A GN is after all a GN.
     
  26. Q.G.

    Q.G. Inactive

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    Better think that over once again. :wink:

    That's because the amount of light it effectively throws onto the subject depends on the conditions.
    Flash, as main light, is used most indoors. How much effect flash has depends on things like the proximity and colour/reflectance of walls and ceilings, and the like, to bounce considerable proportions of the light that would otherwise (outdoors) miss the subject completely back onto the subject.
    The Guide Number is stated for indoors.

    Another reason why it is called a Guide, is because it guides you through the calculations you need to do to determine f-stops to set.

    Not because it changes with film sensitivity.
    That is taken care of by stating guide numbers for a single, 'normed' ISO value.