Exposure bias with color neg and slide films?

Discussion in 'Color: Film, Paper, and Chemistry' started by cooltouch, Feb 1, 2009.

  1. I picked up a tip many years ago, from a source I no longer recall, that if one shot Kodachrome 64 at ISO 80, color saturation was improved. So, I started doing so, and sure enough, my slides did show improved color saturation. I never tried adjusting the exposure with E-6 slide film, though. I'm curious if there are any commonly used adjustments to current popular E-6 emulsions?

    Also, a guy I used to know way back when, who shot weddings, told me that he would always overexpose his print film by a certain amount. I forget how much now. I do recall trying this, and it worked very well. But I almost never shot print film and I've since forgotten the amount of adjustment I dialed in. So, if you use a bias with color neg film, I'd be curious to know what amount you find gives best saturation with which emulsions -- or is it pretty well emulsion independent? Or do you even bother?

    Best,

    Michael
     
  2. Ian Grant

    Ian Grant Subscriber
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    With E6 a third of a stop underexposure is all that I'd use, and with C41 a third of a stop over exposure.

    Ian
     
  3. Aurum

    Aurum Member

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    I'd agree with Ian on the C41 print film, an extra 1/3 stop gives a nice bit of extra punch to the image. I don't use enough slide film to comment on 1/3 under, but it sounds right.
    If in doubt, try bracketing your exposures a third either way to convince yourself
     
  4. Alexander Ghaffari

    Alexander Ghaffari Member

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    I shoot most of my slide film 1/3 stop under and most of my color negative film 2/3 stop over the rated ISO.
     
  5. Chan Tran

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    I shoot mainly color negative films and mostly Kodak. The amount of bias depends on the film type. With ISO100 film I usually do not bias or by +1/3 stop. With ISO200 or the Portra I would bias by +2/3 stop. ISO400, 800 I don't bias as when I shoot these films I need all the speed I can get.
     
  6. OP
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    cooltouch

    cooltouch Member
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    DOH! I guess that would be the obvious way to determine the best EV value, eh? I've got some ISO 400 Fuji Superia loaded in my F2, so I think I'll do some bracketing tomorrow. It may not give the same punch as a slower emulsion (?), but I need to finish up that roll anyway.

    Best,

    Michael
     
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