enormous increase of speed with current Neopan 400

On The Mound

A
On The Mound

  • 0
  • 0
  • 22
Park in Prague

A
Park in Prague

  • 3
  • 1
  • 133
Independence Mill

D
Independence Mill

  • 5
  • 0
  • 142
Independence Mill

D
Independence Mill

  • 1
  • 2
  • 208
Mad Max

A
Mad Max

  • 2
  • 0
  • 157

Recent Classifieds

Forum statistics

Threads
189,668
Messages
2,645,116
Members
97,326
Latest member
stan_1
Recent bookmarks
4

markbarendt

Member
Joined
May 18, 2008
Messages
9,425
Location
Beaverton, OR
Format
Multi Format
Was the Finol you used made from a new batch of raw chems, some new employee on the mixing line?
 

Mick Fagan

Subscriber
Joined
Sep 13, 2005
Messages
4,226
Location
Melbourne Au
Format
Multi Format
The comments below, refer to 135 film, not 120, however I believe that within reason, similar results would be obtained with 120 film.

I have been a big user of Neopan 400; I’ve used around 300 rolls in the last couple of years. I have also used about 30 rolls of Neopan 1600 since the start of this year.

Fuji have a wonderful film in Neopan 400 and I found it works best for me with wonderful results and near grainless prints, when developed in my system using D76 1+1.

One of the features of Neopan 1600, according to Fuji, is that Neopan 1600 is designed to be developed at the same temperature, dilution and time as Neopan 400. Making it possible to develop both films in the same bath. From a photographer’s point of view, this is a great help in simplification and reduction of cost and time.

Basically this is true and I have developed Neopan 400 and Neopan 1600 in the same bath and had fantastic results, doing this.

I myself have found that Neopan 400 works best for me with my system and cameras when I expose it at 320 ASA. Using the same processing system, I have found that Neopan 1600 comes out at very close to 800 ASA.

When it comes to grain, you will notice only a small difference with normal cloudy bright weather, or broken up clouds and dappled sunlight, between the two films. If the light is of a high contrast, then you will notice the difference more in the contrast than in the grain, with Neopan 1600 being reasonably contrasty by comparison.

If you are shooting in low light, then the grain in Neopan 1600 becomes prominent. The same happens with Neopan 400, but the Neopan 1600 film will really have prominent grain, in comparison. We are not talking of golf ball sized grain, just prominent.

I believe that Neopan 1600 is really an 800 ASA film, this I assume from my own usage and from technical papers from Fuji.

I have a tendency to believe that somehow, you really do have Neopan 1600 film wrapped as Neopan 400.

It is not inconceivable; remember that there have been massive reductions in film manufacturing. This along with the possible movement of master rolls having been stored or moved around with new or replaced staff, anything is possible. I do realise that this is a highly unlikely possibility, but it would be possible nonetheless.

PE makes some interesting comments regarding the edge markings being of the incorrect exposure and that they would be noticeable. I agree, but as the difference in reality with the two films only being 1 stop or 1¼ stops at the most, not 2 and possibly a bit stops, then that could explain that.

Some food for thought.

Mick.
 
Photrio.com contains affiliate links to products. We may receive a commission for purchases made through these links.
To read our full affiliate disclosure statement please click Here.

PHOTRIO PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Ilford ADOX Freestyle Photographic Stearman Press Weldon Color Lab Blue Moon Camera & Machine
Top Bottom