Devloping Kodak 7266 as a Negative?

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by graciemansion, Mar 5, 2018.

  1. graciemansion

    graciemansion Member

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    So I recently got my hands on a Minolta 16mm still camera and I bought some Kodak 7266 (Tri-X reversal) to load into it. I've already got the film into the camera so now it's just a matter of shooting and developing it. Kodak's technical documents say you can process this film as a negative, but they don't give any development times. I have hc110 on hand. Does anyone know of the development time for this film and hc110, and also what ISO to rate it as? I don't care if the results are perfect. Thanks in advance!
     
  2. studiocarter

    studiocarter Member

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    graciemansion

    graciemansion Member

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    So to give a bit of an update, I rated the film at ISO 100 and just developed in hc110, dilution h, for 12 minutes. I was surprised. The film came out really well! It doesn't look over or under developed to me. I'm really happy with this camera. The negatives look very sharp.
     
  4. guangong

    guangong Subscriber

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    I’all keep your results in mind. I process 7266 as reversal as movie stock but I also use Minolta 16 cameras, so I could use short ends for processing as negatives. Usually I just slit Delta 100 or 400.
    What Minolta 16 do you have? Among the several that I own, I prefer Minolta 16 II because of manual control of exposure. Compared with original prices (they were rather expensive when new), mint 16s are quite cheap and you can try them all models out to see which you prefer.
     
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    graciemansion

    graciemansion Member

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    It's a Minolta MG-S. It produces larger negative than the older models and has manual controls too. I've been yet to try printing the negatives but I'm pretty impressed with how sharp they look. The only thing I don't like about it is that it's fixed focus. I've also yet to try the metering. I just need to buy a battery.
     
  6. guangong

    guangong Subscriber

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    I also have an MG-S. The manual controls are one the vague side. Only the Minolta 16 (with fewer shutter speeds) and the 16 II (more shutter speed choices) offer real exposure control. Also, they are much smaller. However, on occasion I do use my MG and MG-S but their size begins to approach that of the Olympus XA. I bought my first Minolta 16, in iridescent red, in about 1959-60 but don’t remember what happened to it.
    Have fun!
     
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    graciemansion

    graciemansion Member

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    What do you mean "the vague side?" You can set the aperture and shutter speed- are you saying the controls aren't accurate?
     
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