Critical comparison between polaroid originals and instax film

Discussion in 'Instant Cameras, Backs and Film' started by Ces1um, Nov 10, 2017.

  1. Ces1um

    Ces1um Member
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    I was hoping to start a discussion about the differences, pros and cons of these two film stocks to provide insight into their individual strengths and weaknesses. I'd like to avoid all mention of the now defunct impossible film stock as it no longer is being produced. The format (square, credit card size, traditional polaroid, spectra, wide etc.) would be fair game. Colour tone, clarity, contrast, etc.. would also be great to comment on. I would prefer that commenters actually have personal experience with both film stocks.

    To get things started, I'll mention that I've noticed that Fuji instax film suffers from a flaw that I have not noticed with the new polaroid originals film. Any areas in the photograph that are particularly bright will show up as black in the instax film (photos of the sun, bright candles, flash reflections). Polaroid originals doesn't suffer from this problem.

    I've also noticed that Fuji instax photos seem clearer or more detailed, but only marginally so over the new polaroid original film.

    What have been your experiences?
     
  2. choiliefan

    choiliefan Member
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    I can't comment on the latest films and emulsions but believe one of the current systems may be based on the the old Kodak Colorbust films. I have a few very old Colorburst shots which are still tack sharp with good contrast. Compared to these, my old Polaroid shots are muddy in both detail and color, just as they were when fresh out of the camera.
     
  3. Ed Sawyer

    Ed Sawyer Member

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    May as well compare FP100c too, snce it is still widely available.
     
  4. OP
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    Ces1um

    Ces1um Member
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    have you got any comments about any of these films?
     
  5. David T T

    David T T Subscriber

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    Imma give this a *bump* for those that check for new posts. I'm very interested!
     
  6. Theo Sulphate

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    Although I haven't used Polaroid Originals yet (because I still have Impossible packs) and I don't have Instax, my interest are comments relating to:

    - accuracy of color reproduction
    - rendition of very bright or very dark scenes
    - evidence of fading
     
  7. RattyMouse

    RattyMouse Member

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    My kids have been shooting INSTAX for years and none of the images show any sign of fading at all. Very very impressive. My Impossible film shots faded in under 3 months by comparison!
     
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    Ces1um

    Ces1um Member
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    @Theo Sulphate I too have noticed a lot of fading in my old impossible photos. The Polaroid Originals are still only new out, but I haven't seen any evidence of fading. I do find that even with flash that the film always wants more light though. The colours are certainly more vibrant and the darks are more defined. I still think the instax formulations are superior (with the exception of how they handle very bright areas), but I prefer the size of the original polaroid format.
     
  9. darkosaric

    darkosaric Subscriber
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    The problem with comparison here is also that you have pretty shitty cameras for great instax films, and great cameras for Polaroid original films. So the Polaroid has advantage in camera choice, while instax has advantage in pricing (and advantage is huge - you get 20 photos for the price of 8 Polaroid photos).
    Somebody posted here video how to shot instax films in Polaroid SLR cameras: this, and medium format back for instax are the way to go.
     
  10. OP
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    Ces1um

    Ces1um Member
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    So basically instax wide/square might be the better way to go if you are a DIYer and don't mind modding cameras. If you aren't that kind of person though, Polaroid Originals may be the way to go. At least with polaroid originals they are actively researching how to improve their products. Eventually we may have a truly spectacular polaroid film.
     
  11. darkosaric

    darkosaric Subscriber
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    In any case I support both teams - I have instax mini and wide camera (happy to have B&W instax finally), and I am also pioneer at Impossible/Polaroid, with life time discount :smile:.
     
  12. SilverShutter

    SilverShutter Member
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    Instax really tends to be the winner in terms of quality of film, it behaves mostly as a quite contrasty slide film, tend to prefer under to overexposure, but still, they age quite well and they are much cheaper. The only advantage Polaroid has is nice cameras and I guess the square format.
     
  13. ic-racer

    ic-racer Member

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    It is hard to comment on something that is no longer available. I'm shooting my last box of FP3000 this holiday season. I have never tried instax, but the reason I'm reading this forum is I'm in the process of making a couple Graflok film backs for Instax film. I find it a little hard to believe one can't buy these [Instax Graflok backs]. So, I am interested in how people are using both films in the same camera for the comparison.

    The thing is, I don't have any Graflok FP3000/FP100 backs, so still no way to do any direct comparison of the films for me. All my FP3000/FP100 backs are camera-specific non-Graflok and can't be used with Polaroid film.

    I suspect others must feel the incredible frustration trying to find instant-film backs for their cameras for which film is actually available.

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Dec 12, 2017
  14. wyofilm

    wyofilm Subscriber
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    Same for the Fuji FP100c film.
     
  15. Theo Sulphate

    Theo Sulphate Subscriber
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    It is sad that I discovered this camera only after Fuji discontinued their FP-3000B and FP-100C films:

    http://camera-wiki.org/wiki/Polaroid_600/600_SE

    Rangefinder focusing, great lenses, manual selection of shutter speed and aperture.

    The mighty G00SE!
     
  16. Prof_Pixel

    Prof_Pixel Member
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    I spent 7 years working on the Kodak Instant Film System - which is basically what Fuji Instax Film is. It used a core/shell direct reversal emulsion in which the image latent image electrons go internal into the grain. The developer contains a nucleating agent that goes to the grain surface where there is no internal latent image and makes such grains developable. Thus making a positive image. I suspect the problem you are talking about is caused by a high level of exposure that produces more electrons than can all go internal, leaving some on the surface making the grain developable and causing the black spot you mention. Polaroid chemistry is completely different.
     
    Last edited: Dec 12, 2017
  17. ic-racer

    ic-racer Member

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    Yes that and also the Polaroid 180 was great.
    I'll be starting a new thread, but to convert either of those to Instax, there may be issues with the position of the Instax film plane, depending on how one is going to do the conversion. So...my project is centered around the Horseman VH-R, because its rangefinder system can be set to compensate for nearly any film plane. What that means is the instax conversion can put the film plane wherever is convenient for the mechanics of it. The rangefinder can then be calibrated to the new Instax back by adjustment of the infinity stops.
     
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