Camera straps. What do you use?

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KerrKid

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I always had this thin black camera strap for my Minolta SRT-101. I didn't know any better. I just got a Peak Design Slide sling strap and one of their Cuff wrist straps. I was looking at the Blackrapid Sport X and that looked really nice, too.

I don't know much about these things, but wasn't sure about the benefits of having your camera at your side or in front (like I'm used to) or hanging upside down. Upside down just seems odd to me. So does a camera hanging off my side. I feel like the camera is more likely to hit stuff that way.

There are so many options out there. What do you all have and like?
 

xkaes

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There are a TON of options -- and it takes a while to figure out what works best for you.. AND, you might use one method one day and a different one the next.

Ron Galella --the ORIGINAL paparazzo -- carried his camera high on his chest, close to his chin. Why? He said, to be the best paparazzo, you have to have eye contact with your subject -- not having them looking at a camera lens. Then you can get the best picture -- without looking through the viewfinder. Keep in mind, he did NOT use auto-focusing gear.

Ron died a couple of days ago at 91.
 

madNbad

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The Peak Design Leash works well with smaller cameras. The seatbelt size Slide is designed for big DSLR’s with heavy lenses. I’ve used the Leash with Leica M bodies, as well as Nikon F’s and Nikkormats. As others will correctly point out, there are a whole lot of straps out there and most of them work really well.
 
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KerrKid

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There are a TON of options -- and it takes a while to figure out what works best for you.. AND, you might use one method one day and a different one the next.

Ron Galella --the ORIGINAL paparazzo -- carried his camera high on his chest, close to his chin. Why? He said, to be the best paparazzo, you have to have eye contact with your subject -- not having them looking at a camera lens. Then you can get the best picture -- without looking through the viewfinder. Keep in mind, he did NOT use auto-focusing gear.

Ron died a couple of days ago at 91.

Yes, a ton. Bewildering. I put the sling strap on one of my cameras and wore it around my neck for about 5 minutes before thinking it could use a sheep skin pad on it. I'd really look pathetic with that, but I'd be comfy. Wearing it over the shoulder felt weird and the camera just didn't come to hand well since the sling has to shift a lot that way.

Carrying the camera high - I never thought of that, but it makes a lot of sense. Sounds like Ron had a good run. I looked him up and the pix were great.
 

Paul Howell

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I like the wide 70s vintage straps, too bad my more modern cameras like the Minolta 9 will not work with one.
 
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KerrKid

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The Peak Design Leash works well with smaller cameras. The seatbelt size Slide is designed for big DSLR’s with heavy lenses. I’ve used the Leash with Leica M bodies, as well as Nikon F’s and Nikkormats. As others will correctly point out, there are a whole lot of straps out there and most of them work really well.

I'll be using the Slide with my heavy Minolta SRT-101's. When I was 18, I didn't realize they were heavy, but now they feel like tanks.
 

MattKing

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I like a strap that is comfortable on the shoulder and long enough to wear diagonally across my body. When I am also carrying a camera bag, I like the strap on it to be similarly long, and I’ll usually wear both at the same time, on opposite shoulders, bandolier style.
 

benjiboy

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I use a wrist step because my Canon F1s are heavy. and are like a millstone around my neck especially with a long lens fitted, although I do have a couple of Domke gripper straps that I occasionally use
 
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I never found a neck strap that was comfortable, secure and functional, and I've been photographing with SLRs since the 1970s. My ultimate solution has been to use the Think Tank Digital Holster 20


along with the Digital Holster Harness


and, for drop protection, a wrist strap. The finest wrist strap I ever found was Joby's


but it's apparently been discontinued for a while. I bought up the last five I could find anywhere a bit more than one year ago. Look around for whatever wrist strap seems like it'll work for you.
 
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KerrKid

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I like a strap that is comfortable on the shoulder and long enough to wear diagonally across my body. When I am also carrying a camera bag, I like the strap on it to be similarly long, and I’ll usually wear both at the same time, on opposite shoulders, bandolier style.

The diagonal carry is what I'm not used to. I can see the positives of that position but it just doesn't seem as handy as a camera in front. Of course, the camera bag is another topic altogether. I'd like to know about that, too, since I don't have one.
 

Pieter12

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I use op/tech pro straps on just about every camera and the super-pro for medium format. It is comfortable and you can quickly remove the thicker foam part and clip the loose ends together for something akin to a wrist strap. Usually remove the foam part when the camera is on a tripod.

 

cjbecker

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I use op/tech pro straps on just about every camera and the super-pro for medium format. It is comfortable and you can quickly remove the thicker foam part and clip the loose ends together for something akin to a wrist strap. Usually remove the foam part when the camera is on a tripod.


Same here. My favorite strap.
 

MattKing

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The diagonal carry is what I'm not used to. I can see the positives of that position but it just doesn't seem as handy as a camera in front.

When the length is right, the camera sits at waist height right where my left hand can most comfortably reach and grab it. Then I can easily bring the camera up to my eye, or in the case of a waist level finder camera, to the centre of my chest.
 

abruzzi

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If I'm going to sling a bag over my shoulder (to carry the camera, additional lenses, rolls of film) then I don't want a shoulder strap or neck strap on the camera. In those cases, I use a small wrist strap. That way the camera is carred in the bag, and when I want to shoot, the camera comes out, wrist strap goes on, and i usually carry the camera that way until I need both hands for something else, or I'm pretty sure that I'm not going to take photos for a while.
 
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KerrKid

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I never found a neck strap that was comfortable, secure and functional, and I've been photographing with SLRs since the 1970s. My ultimate solution has been to use the Think Tank Digital Holster 20


along with the Digital Holster Harness


and, for drop protection, a wrist strap. The finest wrist strap I ever found was Joby's


but it's apparently been discontinued for a while. I bought up the last five I could find anywhere a bit more than one year ago. Look around for whatever wrist strap seems like it'll work for you.

I really like that harness and holster! Thanks for the links.
 

lxdude

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I like a strap that is comfortable on the shoulder and long enough to wear diagonally across my body. When I am also carrying a camera bag, I like the strap on it to be similarly long, and I’ll usually wear both at the same time, on opposite shoulders, bandolier style.

Same here. Very secure.
 

awty

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As per other sharp looking photographers. If your going to use an old retro camera, you should look the part. Of course if you are going to use a more modern plastic camera then something less noticeable
 

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250swb

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I often make my own camera straps, nylon webbing, buckles and clips in many widths and colours are available very cheaply on eBay, or a climbing shop would usually stock plenty of cords, webbing, buckles etc. It's ideal if you can't find a strap that's long enough, or just like the idea of something without a loud manufacturer logo.
 

benjiboy

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As I wrote previously, I dislike neck-straps, especially because these days most of my shooting is "street", I tend to have a small bag over my shoulder and carry my camera with an Op-tech neoprene wrist strap attached in my right hand by my side, which is easy to bring the camera up to my eye into the shooting position.
 

guangong

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I wear most of my cameras high on the chest, readily available and less likely to be bumped and damaged. For Hassy and Rollei tlr a little bit lower. For 35mm rf cameras and Minolta 16 I often like to use wrist straps. Olympus XA and Minox, in my posket.
For the most part, I don’t favor wide straps.
How to carry camera with strap? Whatever works for you.
 

Alan9940

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My Leica M's, Nikon F2, and MF folders all have Gordy camera straps attached. For my larger MF cameras--Rolleiflex, Pentax 67--I use a Peak Design slide.
 

darr

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For neck straps, I like ThinkTank's Camera Strap V2.0:
(The one below has Fujifilm embossed, but my others say ThinkTank)
They are lightweight, have a rubberized-type threading that make my cameras stay where I want them to when I walk.
I use them on my Mamiya 6, ALPA SWA, Nikon F3HP.
img_1168-1-e1652626248209.jpg


I like Capturing Couture's designs as well (there are designs without flowers).
I use them on my Canon AE-1 and Minolta CLE.

minolta-cle-40-1-e1652626184823.jpg



Hand straps: I use the Peak Design Cuff on my Fuji X-Pro3, X100V, Hasselblad 907x and ALPA TC.
My other handheld type cameras (Hasselblad, Rolleiflex, Cambo Wide) I prefer not to use a strap.

hasselblad-907x.jpg
 
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John Koehrer

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Unfortunately opinions on things like this are innumerable sorta like shoes or cameras. You're
gonna have to try a few and deal with some experimenting.
I ended up using old Contax straps that are fabric with a slight curve at the neck.
I've used narrow, wide, long and short, brand name and generic, fabric, leather and synthetic
for over forty years.

It may take a while!
 
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