Cachet/Maco Structura Lux

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David A. Goldfarb

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I picked up some cheap Cachet Structura Lux that was probably old stock to experiment with a bit. It seems like an interesting material (photo linen that can be mounted on a stretcher and handled like any kind of fabric), but fresh stock is pricy, so I figure this is a way to learn how to handle it. I realize that out of date paper can have some base fog, but I was getting off-the-scale levels of base fog and way-too-short exposure times.

Recommended development time is 3 minutes in a high energy developer and the nominal printing speed is on the fast side, but not out of the ordinary.

I was processing in Agfa Neutol WA (1+7) and after the first couple of test strips added 1 oz/quart of Edwal Liquid Orthazite (i.e., the maximum recommended dosage). 3 minutes was just too foggy, so I eventually cut down to 50 seconds, and still had a kind of light gray background and a generally flat look, and exposure was 15 sec. at f:11, even with such a short development time.

Is this normal for this stuff? Do I just have a lousy batch, or is Neutol WA an inappropriate developer? Other developers I have on hand are Dektol, and I can mix up various amidol developers.
 
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David A. Goldfarb

David A. Goldfarb

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Not yet. This was just my first attempt. I looked back at the tech sheet, and I'm thinking I just chose the wrong developer. The instructions say that "low energy" developers will produce muddy results. I don't think of Neutol-WA 1+7 as "low energy," but maybe as a warmtone developer it has some ingredient common to developers that produce muddy results, and that's what's at fault.
 

victor

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david...
my experiance with the old papers (very out of date, namly the agfa protagia) is that nothing really helps, and it doesnt worth the efforts even for proof-like prints, surely not for prints for exhebition or any high quality needs.
if u can, just change it in the shop for a new verssion if u like the paper generally.
i want to start to use it (the maco or the fotospeed) soon instead of liqued emulssion (at those times that i apply the liqueed the way that this maco will look about the same).
 

Ole

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Fogged paper is often great for lith printing. If that's not what you want, a liberal dose of benzotriazol (and to a lesser extent KBr) will suppress fog.
 
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