Box Brownie no2 help/recommendations

Discussion in 'Lo-Fi Cameras' started by BADGER.BRAD, Jun 11, 2017.

  1. BADGER.BRAD

    BADGER.BRAD Member

    Messages:
    98
    Joined:
    Apr 27, 2017
    Location:
    Dudley in old England
    Shooter:
    35mm
    Hello all,
    I seem to be moving back in time with my camera equipment, in a few more months I will be doing cave paintings !
    I may have lost the plot but am looking for help using the Kodak no2 which I have just purchased.Can anyone recommend which 120mm roll film to use (b&w + colour) and where to get it processed in the UK ? which settings to use in what situation and how best to use the camera generally in the real world.

    Thanks all
     
  2. 75suzuki

    75suzuki Member

    Messages:
    33
    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2017
    Location:
    Tacoma Washington
    Shooter:
    Medium Format
    I don't have any experience with this, but am interested in finding out as well. I also own a similar camera, mine is the Anasco copy of the Kodak 2a. I havent shot anything with it yet and would love to know what films seem to work well for these box cams.
     
  3. GregW

    GregW Member

    Messages:
    324
    Joined:
    Dec 10, 2012
    Location:
    East Coast
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    The shutter is 1/50th a sec or should be and the apertures are f16 f 32 and f 64. For bw FP4 from Ilford to HP5. Portra 160 for color ought to work. Stay about 10-12 ft from your subject at least. If you don't have an exposure meter google "the Sunny 16 rule" it will help with exposure setting. Print out the guide and stick it in your pocket. That will be your exposure meter to consult. BTW the small hole is f45 largest f16 etc. It also might be fun to read the original manual for it. http://www.cameramanuals.org/kodak_pdf/kodak_brownie_2.pdf There are video's on youtube as well on how to load it etc... Enjoy your new camera.
     
    Last edited: Jun 12, 2017
  4. Wayne

    Wayne Subscriber

    Messages:
    2,499
    Joined:
    Jul 8, 2005
    Location:
    USA
    Shooter:
    Large Format
    I use HP5+ in my Brownie 2C. Fun cameras. I had to adapt my spools so its a bit wonky but yours should be fine.

    [​IMG]
     
  5. Two23

    Two23 Subscriber

    Messages:
    450
    Joined:
    Jul 4, 2010
    Location:
    South Dakota
    Shooter:
    4x5 Format
    I went through a box camera craze a couple of years ago, buying and using about two dozen. I have kept a 1904 & 1932 Kodak Brownie No. 2, along with a Kodak Panoram. The shutter seems to be about 1/30 -- 1/40s. The apertures on the strip seem to correspond to f11, f16, f22. I mostly use Ilford FP4 in it and have had very good luck. Metering is Sunny 16. I also have used ISO 400 film plus an orange filter held or taped over the lens, or no filter when shooting in lower light. This has worked well used in conjunction with an incident light meter. I've also shot with it at night, again using an incident light meter with camera on tripod using "B" mode.

    http://www.brownie-camera.com/tech.shtml


    Kent in SD
     
    Last edited: Jun 12, 2017
  6. jnanian

    jnanian Advertiser Advertiser

    Messages:
    22,717
    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2003
    Location:
    paswonquitte
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Groups:
    hi brad
    i use my box cameras with flat light, not excessively bright contrasty light
    and low iso film. i process the b/w myself in caffneol.
     
  7. 75suzuki

    75suzuki Member

    Messages:
    33
    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2017
    Location:
    Tacoma Washington
    Shooter:
    Medium Format
    Thanks for the tips :smile:

    Its tough finding info on these, let alone their proper use with modern film.
     
  8. Cholentpot

    Cholentpot Member

    Messages:
    1,204
    Joined:
    Oct 26, 2015
    Shooter:
    35mm
    I use one, I've run 100 speed Shanghai GP3 developed in D-76 stock in the past. Works best on even light and landscapes. Oddly enough they are a joy to use, they sit well in the hand the viewfinder while tiny does the job. Mine came with two wooden reels.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  9. OP
    OP
    BADGER.BRAD

    BADGER.BRAD Member

    Messages:
    98
    Joined:
    Apr 27, 2017
    Location:
    Dudley in old England
    Shooter:
    35mm
    Nice photos for something so basic,Thanks for the info everyone ,much appreciated. I may try to use a similar design in the future for a pinhole camera. Once I have some film and have had it processed I'll post up the photos on here. next time round I may even process it myself.
     
  10. LAG

    LAG Member

    Messages:
    1,004
    Joined:
    Aug 8, 2016
    Location:
    The moon
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    The shutter will depend more on the state of the mechanism (it should be something closer to 1/30 +/- 1/50) but the apertures are f/16 f22 and f/36
     
  11. Cholentpot

    Cholentpot Member

    Messages:
    1,204
    Joined:
    Oct 26, 2015
    Shooter:
    35mm
    It got the job done for my Great Grandpa, It'll get the job done for me.
     
  12. OP
    OP
    BADGER.BRAD

    BADGER.BRAD Member

    Messages:
    98
    Joined:
    Apr 27, 2017
    Location:
    Dudley in old England
    Shooter:
    35mm
    Does anyone know what ASA/ISO the original film would have been ? I would like to stick to as near as I can what the camera was designed for as a starting point.
     
  13. Verichrome Pan was rated ASA 125 from a roll that expired in January 1978.
     
  14. Two23

    Two23 Subscriber

    Messages:
    450
    Joined:
    Jul 4, 2010
    Location:
    South Dakota
    Shooter:
    4x5 Format
    I believe it was something like ISO 50. The way I figured that out was (1) Sunny 16 means using the f16 aperature and the shutter speed is 1/30s to 1/50s on those cameras (2) I have used Ilford Pan F 50 with good success in the four or five Kodak Brownies I owned (vintage ranged from 1904 to 1932.) Mostly I shoot ISO 100 film in them though. Keep in mind that in the early 1960s there was a change in the way film speed was rated. IIRC, it was basically cut in half.


    Kent in SD
     
  15. jnanian

    jnanian Advertiser Advertiser

    Messages:
    22,717
    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2003
    Location:
    paswonquitte
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Groups:
    also remember the prints would have been contact prints on azo made at a drugstore at some point
    the negatives would have been higher contrast than what people aim for today contrast ...
     
  16. darkroommike

    darkroommike Subscriber

    Messages:
    1,017
    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2007
    Location:
    Iowa
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    I have done contact prints on both Azo and Velox but Kodak (and others) made another paper for photofinishing that was a sort of self-masking DOP, GAF Monodex and Kodak Velox Unicontrast (see Photographic Facts and Formulas, 1975,`Wall, Jordan,`and Carroll, p. 204).
     
  17. pentaxpete

    pentaxpete Subscriber

    Messages:
    377
    Joined:
    Sep 23, 2010
    Location:
    Brentwood, England
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    I did a Video on my Brownie Box -- you can see it here :

     
  18. LAG

    LAG Member

    Messages:
    1,004
    Joined:
    Aug 8, 2016
    Location:
    The moon
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    It's a pity you have sacrified that 1980 film, there're plenty of video examples on the Internet about what you've done (IMHO of course), nevertheless welcome. By the way when I need to use my Kodak Brownie Flash IV I only roll it once (120 to 620), it is not strictly necessary to "re-roll" again.

    All the best!
     
  19. jnanian

    jnanian Advertiser Advertiser

    Messages:
    22,717
    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2003
    Location:
    paswonquitte
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Groups:
    yep ..
    there were lots of different papers to print consumer box cameras. i was just attempting to suggest to the OP that
    the negatives were usually contact printed and by some people's ( current DOP enlargement ) standards cooked/contrasty for the materials
    being used to print them ... not trying to get into an argument about esoteric brands or names of commercial
    and drug store papers used to print on that are currently forgotten about.
    ALSO,
    if the OP wants to make his own gaslight paper / silver chloride / chlorobromide &c papers,
    there are fun and inexpensive ways to do this at present. he just needs to wander to thelightfarm.com or to blurb
    and pick up one of denise ross' books and a few grams of silver nitrate, and some safety goggles ...
    its almost as easy as making a peanut butter and jelly sandwich cut into sailboats ..
    and hours more fun. ( YMMV )

    sorry, i don't have the book you mentioned ..
     
  20. OP
    OP
    BADGER.BRAD

    BADGER.BRAD Member

    Messages:
    98
    Joined:
    Apr 27, 2017
    Location:
    Dudley in old England
    Shooter:
    35mm
    Another nice little video, I found mine on Ebay but went to a local car boot (flea market) the other day and spotted 6 box cameras across 3 stalls I wonder if in 80 to 100 years time they will be sell DSLRs in any kind of working order ?
     
  21. Sewin

    Sewin Subscriber

    Messages:
    379
    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2015
    Location:
    South West Wales
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Hi Brad,

    You are certainly stepping back in time and enjoying it, when's the penny farthing being delivered :smile:
     
  22. OP
    OP
    BADGER.BRAD

    BADGER.BRAD Member

    Messages:
    98
    Joined:
    Apr 27, 2017
    Location:
    Dudley in old England
    Shooter:
    35mm
    I've only got as far back as the 1980's with the bikes up to this point Sewin but I'm working on it !
     
  23. M Carter

    M Carter Member

    Messages:
    1,448
    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2013
    Location:
    Dallas, TX
    Shooter:
    Medium Format
    I've tested some of my old 120 cameras for exposure by checking with internet guesses/data, shooting a couple frames of a gray card and a still life, rewinding the film, and then shooting the rest of the roll in a known camera (RB in my case) with exposures around the "best guess". Some of those simple old shutters can slow down; my Hawkeye took some light oiling of a few shutter components to get the speed up and stop the occasional hang.

    I've also tested shutter speeds with my video camera - I have one that shoots up to 120 fps at 1080p, so I'll shoot a few squeezes of the shutter and count the frames in an editor. That will show you speeds up to the camera's frame rate. My brownie, for instance, is about 1/25th - good to know what it's really doing I suppose.