Beseler 45MCRX Problem...Any Suggestions?

Discussion in 'Darkroom Equipment' started by tomkatf, Dec 29, 2017.

  1. tomkatf

    tomkatf Subscriber

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    Recently purchased a used Beseler 45MCRX and after taking it home and cleaning it up, noticed that the entire central assembly (light housing, negative stage, carriage, etc.) is tilted slightly to the left... see gap where carriage edge is next to the frame in photos. Nothing appears to be bent, so I'm wondering if it's possible that the carriage was set up one tooth higher on the right side??? Is there anything else that could cause this misalignment? Would greatly appreciate any thoughts and solutions! Thanks for your help,
    T beseler1.jpg beseler2.jpg om
     
  2. jacaquarie

    jacaquarie Member

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    Yep!
    Most likely has skipped a tooth on the rack on one side
    Measure from baseboard to cross rails or other easily referenced point on each side. Simple fix, just takes some time. Support carriage ( I made a spacer block from bottom of focus rack to baseboard) then pick a side, I suggest left side, less stuff in way. Remove rack, shift up or down as appropriate then secure in place with removed screws. I found this took a couple tries to engage correct teeth on rack then get rack back in place. Be patient, this can be done!
    Let me know your success.
    Will suggest if you transport enlarger support carriage so this does not happen again.

    An
     
  3. M Carter

    M Carter Member

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    One side has skipped a tooth. I did what the owner's manual says - remove the stop-screw at the bottom right of the frame (the long bolt that hits the up-down switch to keep the carriage from going off the rails). If possible, get a helper.

    Make sure the frame/baseboard is level - shim it if it isn't. Hold the bottom tube of the carriage with both hands, and have someone work the switch so the carriage drops from the tracks - just the bottom tube needs to drop free. Now lift the carriage up so it contacts the teeth left and right, and have someone flip the switch "up". Push the carriage up so it catches and begins to rise. Check it for level - it should be about the same level as the baseboard and frame-top. If not, try again. Might take a few tries, but you'll get it. If you can balance or tape a level to the top carriage tube, it can help you get it lines up before someone hits the "up" switch.

    You can do this yourself, but then you need to lift the carriage with one hand and hit the switch with another... or grow a third arm!
     
    Last edited: Dec 29, 2017
  4. OP
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    tomkatf

    tomkatf Subscriber

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    Thank you both for your quick and detailed fixes, I really appreciate it!! My new darkroom project for the weekend!

    Best,
    Tom
     
  5. jacaquarie

    jacaquarie Member

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    Wow!
    Removing stop pin for switch sounds much easier, try that way.
    I did not have manual and I am a natural at doing anything the hard way.
    Did clean and oil the tracks while I had them out.

    Aj
     
  6. OP
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    tomkatf

    tomkatf Subscriber

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    Well, that couldn't have been much easier! Removed elevation stop and lowered the carriage. At first wouldn't go down far enough to allow the gears to drop off the toothed rack. The focusing rack would hit the baseboard. Removed the baseboard (4 screws) which gave me another inch or so. Lowered the carriage again and felt it disengage off the toothed rack. Pushed up on the left side of the carriage and reengaged the motor upward. Gears immediately meshed and the alignment was perfect! Reattached baseboard and elevation stop. Checked level of negative stage, lens stage and baseboard... All virtually perfect! Thanks again for your comments and solutions, it really turned out much easier than I expected! Tom
     
  7. paul ron

    paul ron Subscriber

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    thats great itsback on track again.

    i just rebuilt mine and gave her a good going over for the first time in 30 years. you do know the 2 bars in the rear can adjust by turning the basemounts?

    i have a serve ce manual ill attach for ya later.
     
  8. OP
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    tomkatf

    tomkatf Subscriber

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    Thank you Sir!!
     
  9. paul ron

    paul ron Subscriber

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    sorry the instruction file is too large to upload here. PM me your email address?

    OH Butkus has it too. Google it?

    If you are mechanically inclined... you can adjust the top and bottom negative stages to the lens stage by using the nylon pads at the rear dovetail slide. There are small screws with a locking nut. brass shims as needed and you can dial it in so nice n clean. its just a PITA to get to them and work the front.
     
    Last edited: Dec 30, 2017
  10. Steve Goldstein

    Steve Goldstein Subscriber

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    I couldn't find it on butkus.org, but I just downloaded a copy from jollinger.com.
     
  11. paul ron

    paul ron Subscriber

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  12. Ronald Moravec

    Ronald Moravec Member

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    nothing like a a good line up to improve your enlarging lens. I just use an Omega ( Peak) in all four corners. Must be long mirror version.

    Step two is glass carrier.

    Step 3 is, well none. You have perfection
     
  13. M Carter

    M Carter Member

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    Couple notes on aligning the MXT - the braces that go to the rear of the baseboard can be adjusted to keep the frame from being twisted - but it's tough to tell if they're off. A plastic angle finder works great to be sure the frame isn't twisted.

    The lens stage doesn't have the greatest alignment, but a besalign-style board makes it a piece of cake. Here's a PDF I made showing how to DIY one.

    For the ultimate in enlarger alignment if you're printing fairly big - the Versalign Parallel is just the shizz. Kind of pricey (my awesome Mrs. got me one on a christmas past). Quick and easy. If you want to make aligning the lens with any sort of laser even easier, get a cheapo screw-on skylight filter that fits the lens thread; tape a scrap of paper to the center of the inner side, vs. fiddling with rubber bands and such.