Battery for minolta hi-matic 7s

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What's the best way to go for these? From what I'm reading they will work with a 1.5v cell.

Some say that the zinc air ones are better because they give a close voltage to the original mercury cells, but they don't last long.

Is there a silver oxide equivalent to the v625px?

V625U is the modern equivalent as far as I'm aware.

Just scored a mint example of this camera and can't wait to test it.
It appears to be working, but won't know until I put a film through and test the light meter out, etc.
 

xkaes

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There are several alternatives, but keep in mind that the zinc batteries are not cheap and do not last very long. Also, how a 1.5v battery will mess up the exposure reading varies from camera to camera.

If you have a 1.5v battery that fits, try it and see if it matches the f16 rule. If not, I would recommend a CRIS MR-9 (or similar) 1.5v to 1.35v adapter. Not as cheap as Wein cells, but lasts forever. Check out:

 
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BobD

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Zinc Air 675 batteries can be had for about 50 cents each (6 for ~ $3) on eBay. You'll need a little washer or o-ring to fit the battery chamber. That seems pretty cheap to me.
 
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That adapter seems a good option. I've grabbed a 1.5v cell to try but not sure if the light meter is even working. The pointer is stuck at the top.
Might try cleaning the contacts.
 

MattKing

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Up here Costco has very low prices on 30 packs of hearing aid zinc air batteries.
Some cameras won't work with o-rings, because they require edge contact with the battery. The adapters I've used include ones from Jon Goodman, that solve the contact issue, as well as ones that actually convert the voltage from silver-oxide batteries, which are more convenient and more economical over a long time for heavily used cameras. for a camera that g
 
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Up here Costco has very low prices on 30 packs of hearing aid zinc air batteries.
Some cameras won't work with o-rings, because they require edge contact with the battery. The adapters I've used include ones from Jon Goodman, that solve the contact issue, as well as ones that actually convert the voltage from silver-oxide batteries, which are more convenient and more economical over a long time for heavily used cameras. for a camera that g

Yeah I've seen similar multi packs sold here. They are not that expensive, it's just that their life is short once used.

I'm using a v625u in it at the moment, but think either the needle is jammed or the light meter is dead.

Anyone here farmliar with this camera?
The needle is sitting right up the top with or without any battery installed.
 

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You can check to see if the meter is working correctly on the 7s with a simple test.
Insert the batteries, and set the camera for AUTO exposure with the ISO at 100.
Point at a bright scene, and release the shutter. The shutter should be very quick.
Now cover up the meter cell on the top of the lens (a lens cap is great if you have one), and release the shutter. The shutter should be very LONG.
If that works the metering system is working -- even if the viewfinder display is not.
 

wiltw

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Just get an alkaline button cell and put it into the Himatic...cheap to buy. It is likely to cause the meter to overexpose. You can then also verify basic functionality of the camera...shutter speed operation, aperture close-down control.
  • Verify meter functions, see if setting ISO 250 results in 1/250 f/16 (or equivalent combination)...if not close, alskaline cells is resulting in overexposure; if ISO 250 results in close to 1/250 f/15, alkaline voltage does not affect the meter because it uses Wheatstone Bridge circut design
  • If meter seems to indicate overexposure, you can lie and tell the camera you have ISO 400 film loaded but you really load ISO 100 film, the 'overexposure' for ISO 100 film would be minimal especially if you have color neg loaded.
And if that all works you can then get a Wein air cell for improved exposure accuracy, or find an MR-9 adapter (not with a air hole and using short-lived air cell!) voltage conversion unit which accepts the longer lasting silver oxide button
 
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You can check to see if the meter is working correctly on the 7s with a simple test.
Insert the batteries, and set the camera for AUTO exposure with the ISO at 100.
Point at a bright scene, and release the shutter. The shutter should be very quick.
Now cover up the meter cell on the top of the lens (a lens cap is great if you have one), and release the shutter. The shutter should be very LONG.
If that works the metering system is working -- even if the viewfinder display is not.

I can't hear any difference with the shutter speed while doing that test.
I'm going to pull the bottom cover off and take a look to see if any corrosion is present on the wires as suggested on other threads, but the battery compartment looks clean. There was slight corrosion on the battery but didn't look like leaking. The terminal is in perfect condition.
 

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Best fixed lens rangefinder bar none.

Nearest competitor Auto S2 is much less reliable and overall just not as good, with a few perks such as the finder lines and the (sometimes) build in hood.
Even the supposed upgrade, Hi-Matic 9 is not as good.

The only sane battery option is an MR-9 voltage regulating adapter.
Or actually soldering the components into the camera.
It’s also a fine all manual camera. So a really no need to insist on a battery.

It’s quite easy to glean if the shutter is working ok. Is there a difference between the shutter speeds. And do they look like 1/60th or 1/8th?
 
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Chan Tran

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The PX625a like these


are not expensive and of the right size. The voltage is higher and changes as you use it but for some cameras they work fine. I would try that on your camera first and see how accurate the meter is. Chances are the meter being that old isn't accurate any way even with the right battery.
 

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We must be talking about different cameras. I'm sure you have comparative test results that you will share with us to back up your opinion. I've tested the 7sII against the Canonet QL17 GIII, and the Olympus 35 RD -- considered by many the best of the best.
 
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Best fixed lens rangefinder bar none.

Dear GT,

Which fixed lens rangefinders have you owned/used, which are not as good as the Minolta Hi-Matic 7S, in your view?

I ask because i can think of some cameras that i'd consider better, for example the Kodak Retina IIIc.
 

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Dear GT,

Which fixed lens rangefinders have you owned/used, which are not as good as the Minolta Hi-Matic 7S, in your view?

I ask because i can think of some cameras that i'd consider better, for example the Kodak Retina IIIc.

The Retina is better but it's also more expensive.
 

Chan Tran

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Not necessarily so. Today the market is very weird and the Retina is still under the radar.

I am not talking about today's market. I am talking about the values of these 2 cameras in their days. The Retina wasn't a low end camera but the Hi-matic was. Of course the Hi-Matic is about 15-20 years newer.
 

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We must be talking about different cameras. I'm sure you have comparative test results that you will share with us to back up your opinion. I've tested the 7sII against the Canonet QL17 GIII, and the Olympus 35 RD -- considered by many the best of the best.

Neither the Canon nor the Olympus is known for having the best lens.
They are known for other things.
One of them being small.
Which was kind of the excuse rangefinders had to make for themselves when SLRs won over.
Seriously limiting what it is that actually makes rangefinders worthwhile.

7sII and Konica Auto S3 is (same lens?), like the hyped Tokina made Hexanon 40mm 1.8, the exact tests and stories that allegedly proves the greatness, fades off into nothing when you actually press the issue.

They are alright, but not at all as good as their predecessors.

The 45mm 1.8 is not just a transplanted SLR lens. It takes advantage of the rear element to film plane distance possible and lies right in the optimal spot for a normal lens. No correction needed.
 

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Dear GT,

Which fixed lens rangefinders have you owned/used, which are not as good as the Minolta Hi-Matic 7S, in your view?

I ask because i can think of some cameras that i'd consider better, for example the Kodak Retina IIIc.

The Heligon 2.0 (and 2.8) equipped Retina is superb, and small (and weighty).
But is still a folder, with the small amount of play that implies. And it has a squintier finder.
Close but no cigar.
A 7s in its case is just as portable.

The Automatic III Retina with front cell focus is surprisingly superb too. Surprising as in being only a Tessar with a 2.8 aperture.
 

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Neither the Canon nor the Olympus is known for having the best lens.

I've done actual tests of resolution charts for the Canon, Olympus, and Minolta -- and compared them to the Minolta 45mm SLR lens -- for anyone to see.

All you have provided is -- let me think.........Nothing.
 

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The 45mm 1.8 is not just a transplanted SLR lens. It takes advantage of the rear element to film plane distance possible and lies right in the optimal spot for a normal lens. No correction needed.

Dear G.T.

I understand your point regarding canon and olympus, and it's valid.

However, the lenses on ALL those rangefinders aren't transplanted SLR lenses. They all take advantage of the shorter flange to film distance. Furthermore if you want a more compact lens you do take even more advantage of that.

Moreover, "transplanted SLR lens" doesn't have too much meaning. The Rokkor-PF on the 7s is a 6-element, 5-group double gauss. Just the same as a SLR lens, the only diference is that to use the same design on a SLR, it would probably have to be a 50mm lens not a 45mm lens. But the design, the optical design itself, is identical to a SLR lens.

It's only for wideangle lenses that the design is completely different for SLRs versus rangefinders. Rangefinders don't require retrofocus-type wideangles.

What I would say, however, is that if the manufacturer push "compactness" above everything else, all else being equal (cost, manufacturing precision, state-of-the-art) then optical performance will suffer. And probably the big lens on that Minolta was engineered with optical performance above everything else.
 

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I've done actual tests of resolution charts for the Canon, Olympus, and Minolta -- and compared them to the Minolta 45mm SLR lens -- for anyone to see.

All you have provided is -- let me think.........Nothing.

Ok, there aren't sample images here.

However "resoluton charts" won't tell me the complete story about a lens. A lens should be judged by taking actual pictures and having them printed, or scanned with a very good scanner. There's a lot to be said about the quality of out of focus highlights, vignetting, bokeh balls, how good is the contrast, if there is longitudinal chromatic aberration (ugly), etc.
 

Helge

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Dear G.T.

I understand your point regarding canon and olympus, and it's valid.

However, the lenses on ALL those rangefinders aren't transplanted SLR lenses. They all take advantage of the shorter flange to film distance. Furthermore if you want a more compact lens you do take even more advantage of that.

Moreover, "transplanted SLR lens" doesn't have too much meaning. The Rokkor-PF on the 7s is a 6-element, 5-group double gauss. Just the same as a SLR lens, the only diference is that to use the same design on a SLR, it would probably have to be a 50mm lens not a 45mm lens. But the design, the optical design itself, is identical to a SLR lens.

It's only for wideangle lenses that the design is completely different for SLRs versus rangefinders. Rangefinders don't require retrofocus-type wideangles.

What I would say, however, is that if the manufacturer push "compactness" above everything else, all else being equal (cost, manufacturing precision, state-of-the-art) then optical performance will suffer. And probably the big lens on that Minolta was engineered with optical performance above everything else.

Exactly.
I just meant that it would not be outrageous to think that Minolta would use somewhat the same design as their (excellent) 50mm and 55mm SLR lenses.

Even with a 45mm lens there is some accommodation for the mirror box distance in the optics.
 
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